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  • 1. Anderson, C J
    et al.
    Arritt, R W
    Takle, E S
    Pan, Z T
    Gutowski, W J
    Otieno, F O
    da Silva, R
    Caya, D
    Christensen, J H
    Luthi, D
    Gaertner, M A
    Gallardo, C
    Giorgi, F
    Hong, S Y
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Juang, H M H
    Katzfey, J J
    Lapenta, W M
    Laprise, R
    Larson, J W
    Liston, G E
    McGregor, J L
    Pielke, R A
    Roads, J O
    Taylor, J A
    Hydrological processes in regional climate model simulations of the central United States flood of June-July 19932003In: Journal of Hydrometeorology, ISSN 1525-755X, E-ISSN 1525-7541, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 584-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirteen regional climate model(RCM) simulations of June - July 1993 were compared with each other and observations. Water vapor conservation and precipitation characteristics in each RCM were examined for a 108 x 10degrees subregion of the upper Mississippi River basin, containing the region of maximum 60-day accumulated precipitation in all RCMs and station reports. All RCMs produced positive precipitation minus evapotranspiration ( P - E > 0), though most RCMs produced P - E below the observed range. RCM recycling ratios were within the range estimated from observations. No evidence of common errors of E was found. In contrast, common dry bias of P was found in the simulations. Daily cycles of terms in the water vapor conservation equation were qualitatively similar in most RCMs. Nocturnal maximums of P and C ( convergence) occurred in 9 of 13 RCMs, consistent with observations. Three of the four driest simulations failed to couple P and C overnight, producing afternoon maximum P. Further, dry simulations tended to produce a larger fraction of their 60-day accumulated precipitation from low 3-h totals. In station reports, accumulation from high ( low) 3-h totals had a nocturnal ( early morning) maximum. This time lag occurred, in part, because many mesoscale convective systems had reached peak intensity overnight and had declined in intensity by early morning. None of the RCMs contained such a time lag. It is recommended that short-period experiments be performed to examine the ability of RCMs to simulate mesoscale convective systems prior to generating long-period simulations for hydroclimatology.

  • 2.
    Bärring, Lars
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Christensen, Jens
    Déqué, Michel
    Giorgi, Filippo
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Richard
    Laprise, René
    Rummukainen, Markku
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    von Storch, Hans
    Synthesis of Workshop2005In: Extended abstracts of a WMO/WCRP-sponsored Regional-Scale Climate Modelling Workshop : high-resolution climate modelling : assessment, added value and applications, Lund, Sweden, 29 March-2 April 2004 / [ed] Bärring, Lars; René, Laprise, Department of Physical Geography & Ecosystem Analysis, Lund University, Sweden , 2005, p. 18-25Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3. Caron, Louis-Philippe
    et al.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Analysing present, past and future tropical cyclone activity as inferred from an ensemble of Coupled Global Climate Models2008In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 80-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Caron, Louis-Philippe
    et al.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Understanding and simulating the link between African easterly waves and Atlantic tropical cyclones using a regional climate model: the role of domain size and lateral boundary conditions2012In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 39, no 1-2, p. 113-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a suite of lateral boundary conditions, we investigate the impact of domain size and boundary conditions on the Atlantic tropical cyclone and african easterly Wave activity simulated by a regional climate model. Irrespective of boundary conditions, simulations closest to observed climatology are obtained using a domain covering both the entire tropical Atlantic and northern African region. There is a clear degradation when the high-resolution model domain is diminished to cover only part of the African continent or only the tropical Atlantic. This is found to be the result of biases in the boundary data, which for the smaller domains, have a large impact on TC activity. In this series of simulations, the large-scale Atlantic atmospheric environment appears to be the primary control on simulated TC activity. Weaker wave activity is usually accompanied by a shift in cyclogenesis location, from the MDR to the subtropics. All ERA40-driven integrations manage to capture the observed interannual variability and to reproduce most of the upward trend in tropical cyclone activity observed during that period. When driven by low-resolution global climate model (GCM) integrations, the regional climate model captures interannual variability (albeit with lower correlation coefficients) only if tropical cyclones form in sufficient numbers in the main development region. However, all GCM-driven integrations fail to capture the upward trend in Atlantic tropical cyclone activity. In most integrations, variations in Atlantic tropical cyclone activity appear uncorrelated with variations in African easterly wave activity.

  • 5. Caron, Louis-Philippe
    et al.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Doblas-Reyes, Francisco
    Multi-year prediction skill of Atlantic hurricane activity in CMIP5 decadal hindcasts2014In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 42, no 9-10, p. 2675-2690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a statistical relationship between simulated sea surface temperature and Atlantic hurricane activity, we estimate the skill of a CMIP5 multi-model ensemble at predicting multi-annual level of Atlantic hurricane activity. The series of yearly-initialized hindcasts show positive skill compared to simpler forecasts such as persistence and climatology as well as non-initialized forecasts and return anomaly correlation coefficients of similar to 0.6 and similar to 0.8 for five and nine year forecasts, respectively. Some skill is shown to remain in the later years and making use of those later years to create a lagged-ensemble yields, for individual models, results that approach that obtained by the multi-model ensemble. Some of the skill is shown to come from persisting rather than predicting the climate shift that occur in 1994-1995. After accounting for that shift, the anomaly correlation coefficient for five-year forecasts is estimated to drop to 0.4, but remains statistically significant up to lead years 3-7. Most of the skill is shown to come from the ability of the forecast systems at capturing change in Atlantic sea surface temperature, although the failure of most systems at reproducing the observed slow down in warming over the tropics in recent years leads to an underestimation of hurricane activity in the later period.

  • 6.
    Caron, Louis-Philippe
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Vaillancourt, Paul A.
    Winger, Katja
    On the relationship between cloud-radiation interaction, atmospheric stability and Atlantic tropical cyclones in a variable-resolution climate model2013In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 40, no 5-6, p. 1257-1269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compare two 28-year simulations performed with two versions of the Global Environmental Multiscale model run in variable-resolution mode. The two versions differ only by small differences in their radiation scheme. The most significant modification introduced is a reduction in the ice effective radius, which is observed to increase absorption of upwelling infrared radiation and increase temperature in the upper troposphere. The resulting change in vertical lapse rate is then observed to drive a resolution-dependent response of convection, which in turn modifies the zonal circulation and induces significant changes in simulated Atlantic tropical cyclone activity. The resulting change in vertical lapse rate and its implication in the context of anthropogenic climate change are discussed.

  • 7.
    Caron, Louis-Philippe
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Winger, Katja
    Impact of resolution and downscaling technique in simulating recent Atlantic tropical cylone activity2011In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 37, no 5-6, p. 869-892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the global environmental multiscale (GEM) model, we investigate the impact of increasing model resolution from 2A degrees to 0.3A degrees on Atlantic tropical cyclone activity. There is a clear improvement in the realism of Atlantic storms with increased resolution, in part, linked to a better representation of African easterly waves. The geographical distribution of a Genesis Potential Index, composed of large-scales fields known to impact cyclone formation, coincides closely in the model with areas of high cyclogenesis. The geographical distribution of this index also improves with resolution. We then compare two techniques for achieving local high resolution over the tropical Atlantic: a limited-area model driven at the boundaries by the global 2A degrees GEM simulation and a global variable resolution model (GVAR). The limited-area domain and high-resolution part of the GVAR model coincide geographically, allowing a direct comparison between these two downscaling options. These integrations are further compared with a set of limited-area simulations employing the same domain and resolution, but driven at the boundaries by reanalysis. The limited-area model driven by reanalysis produces the most realistic Atlantic tropical cyclone variability. The GVAR simulation is clearly more accurate than the limited-area version driven by GEM-Global. Degradation in the simulated interannual variability is partly linked to the models failure to accurately reproduce the impact of atmospheric teleconnections from the equatorial Pacific and Sahel on Atlantic cyclogenesis. Through the use of a smaller limited-area grid, driven by GEM-Global 2A degrees, we show that an accurate representation of African Easterly Waves is crucial for simulating Atlantic tropical cyclone variability.

  • 8.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Tjernstrom, Michael
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Omar, Ali H.
    The vertical distribution of thin features over the Arctic analysed from CALIPSO observations2011In: Tellus. Series B, Chemical and physical meteorology, ISSN 0280-6509, E-ISSN 1600-0889, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 77-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clouds play a crucial role in the Arctic climate system. Therefore, it is essential to accurately and reliably quantify and understand cloud properties over the Arctic. It is also important to monitor and attribute changes in Arctic clouds. Here, we exploit the capability of the CALIPSO-CALIOP instrument and provide comprehensive statistics of tropospheric thin clouds, otherwise extremely difficult to monitor from passive satellite sensors. We use 4 yr of data (June 2006-May 2010) over the circumpolar Arctic, here defined as 67-82 degrees N, and characterize probability density functions of cloud base and top heights, geometrical thickness and zonal distribution of such cloud layers, separately for water and ice phases, and discuss seasonal variability of these properties. When computed for the entire study area, probability density functions of cloud base and top heights and geometrical thickness peak at 200-400, 1000-2000 and 400-800 m, respectively, for thin water clouds, while for ice clouds they peak at 6-8, 7-9 and 400-1000 m, respectively. In general, liquid clouds were often identified below 2 km during all seasons, whereas ice clouds were sensed throughout the majority of the upper troposphere and also, but to a smaller extent, below 2 km for all seasons.

  • 9.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Quantifying the clear-sky temperature inversion frequency and strength over the Arctic Ocean during summer and winter seasons from AIRS profiles2010In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 5565-5572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temperature inversions are one of the dominant features of the Arctic atmosphere and play a crucial role in various processes by controlling the transfer of mass and moisture fluxes through the lower troposphere. It is therefore essential that they are accurately quantified, monitored and simulated as realistically as possible over the Arctic regions. In the present study, the characteristics of inversions in terms of frequency and strength are quantified for the entire Arctic Ocean for summer and winter seasons of 2003 to 2008 using the AIRS data for the clear-sky conditions. The probability density functions (PDFs) of the inversion strength are also presented for every summer and winter month. Our analysis shows that although the inversion frequency along the coastal regions of Arctic decreases from June to August, inversions are still seen in almost each profile retrieved over the inner Arctic region. In winter, inversions are ubiquitous and are also present in every profile analysed over the inner Arctic region. When averaged over the entire study area (70 degrees N-90 degrees N), the inversion frequency in summer ranges from 69 to 86% for the ascending passes and 72-86% for the descending passes. For winter, the frequency values are 88-91% for the ascending passes and 89-92% for the descending passes of AIRS/AQUA. The PDFs of inversion strength for the summer months are narrow and right-skewed (or positively skewed), while in winter, they are much broader. In summer months, the mean values of inversion strength for the entire study area range from 2.5 to 3.9 K, while in winter, they range from 7.8 to 8.9 K. The standard deviation of the inversion strength is double in winter compared to summer. The inversions in the summer months of 2007 were very strong compared to other years. The warming in the troposphere of about 1.5-3.0K vertically extending up to 400 hPa was observed in the summer months of 2007.

  • 10.
    Doescher, Ralf
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The development of the coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO2001In: Third study conference on BALTEX / [ed] J. Meywerk, 2001, p. 45-46Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Doescher, Ralf
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willen, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Graham, Phil
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The development of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO2002In: Boreal environment research, ISSN 1239-6095, E-ISSN 1797-2469, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A regional coupled ocean-atmosphere-ice general circulation model for northern Europe is introduced for climate study purposes. The Baltic Sea is interactively coupled. The coupled model is validated in a 5-year hind-cast experiment with a focus on surface quantities and atmosphere-ocean heat fluxes. The coupled sea surface temperature matches observations well. The system is free of drift, does not need flux corrections and is suitable for multi-year climate runs. With flux forcing from the atmospheric model the regional ocean model gives sea surface temperatures statistically equivalent to the uncoupled ocean model forced by observations. Other oceanic surface quantities do not reach this quality in combination with the current atmosphere model. A strong dependence of sea ice extent on details of the atmospheric radiation scheme is found. Our standard scheme leads to an overestimation of ice, most likely due to a negative bias of long-wave radiation. There is indication that a latent heat flux bias in fall contributes to the ice problem. Other atmosphere-ocean heat fluxes are generally realistic in the long term mean.

  • 12. Eyring, Veronika
    et al.
    Righi, Mattia
    Lauer, Axel
    Evaldsson, Martin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wenzel, Sabrina
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Anav, Alessandro
    Andrews, Oliver
    Cionni, Irene
    Davin, Edouard L.
    Deser, Clara
    Ehbrecht, Carsten
    Friedlingstein, Pierre
    Gleckler, Peter
    Gottschaldt, Klaus-Dirk
    Hagemann, Stefan
    Juckes, Martin
    Kindermann, Stephan
    Krasting, John
    Kunert, Dominik
    Levine, Richard
    Loew, Alexander
    Maekelae, Jarmo
    Martin, Gill
    Mason, Erik
    Phillips, Adam S.
    Read, Simon
    Rio, Catherine
    Roehrig, Romain
    Senftleben, Daniel
    Sterl, Andreas
    van Ulft, Lambertus H.
    Walton, Jeremy
    Wang, Shiyu
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Williams, Keith D.
    ESMValTool (v1.0) - a community diagnostic and performance metrics tool for routine evaluation of Earth system models in CMIP2016In: Geoscientific Model Development, ISSN 1991-959X, E-ISSN 1991-9603, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 1747-1802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A community diagnostics and performance metrics tool for the evaluation of Earth system models (ESMs) has been developed that allows for routine comparison of single or multiple models, either against predecessor versions or against observations. The priority of the effort so far has been to target specific scientific themes focusing on selected essential climate variables (ECVs), a range of known systematic biases common to ESMs, such as coupled tropical climate variability, monsoons, Southern Ocean processes, continental dry biases, and soil hydrology-climate interactions, as well as atmospheric CO2 budgets, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, and tropospheric aerosols. The tool is being developed in such a way that additional analyses can easily be added. A set of standard namelists for each scientific topic reproduces specific sets of diagnostics or performance metrics that have demonstrated their importance in ESM evaluation in the peer-reviewed literature. The Earth System Model Evaluation Tool (ESMValTool) is a community effort open to both users and developers encouraging open exchange of diagnostic source code and evaluation results from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) ensemble. This will facilitate and improve ESM evaluation beyond the state-of-the-art and aims at supporting such activities within CMIP and at individual modelling centres. Ultimately, we envisage running the ESMValTool alongside the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) as part of a more routine evaluation of CMIP model simulations while utilizing observations available in standard formats (obs4MIPs) or provided by the user.

  • 13. Guettler, Ivan
    et al.
    Stepanov, Igor
    Brankovic, Cedo
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Impact of Horizontal Resolution on Precipitation in Complex Orography Simulated by the Regional Climate Model RCA3*2015In: Monthly Weather Review, ISSN 0027-0644, E-ISSN 1520-0493, Vol. 143, no 9, p. 3610-3627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydrostatic regional climate model RCA, version 3 (RCA3), of the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute was used to dynamically downscale ERA-40 and the ECMWF operational analysis over a 22-yr period. Downscaling was performed at four horizontal resolutions-50, 25, 12.5, and 6.25 km-over an identical European domain. The model-simulated precipitation is evaluated against high-resolution gridded observational precipitation datasets over Switzerland and southern Norway, regions that are characterized by complex orography and distinct climate regimes. RCA3 generally overestimates precipitation over high mountains: during winter and summer over Switzerland and during summer over central-southern Norway. In the summer, this is linked with a substantial contribution of convective precipitation to the total precipitation errors, especially at the coarser resolutions (50 and 25 km). A general improvement in spatial correlation coefficients between simulated and observed precipitation is observed when the horizontal resolution is increased from 50 to 6 km. The 95th percentile spatial correlation coefficients during winter are much higher for southern Norway than for Switzerland, indicating that RCA3 is more successful at reproducing a relatively simple west-to-east precipitation gradient over southern Norway than a much more complex and variable precipitation distribution over Switzerland. The 6-km simulation is not always superior to the other simulations, possibly indicating that the model dynamical and physical configuration at this resolution may not have been optimal. However, a general improvement in simulated precipitation with increasing resolution supports further use and application of high spatial resolutions in RCA3.

  • 14. Guichard, F
    et al.
    Petch, J C
    Redelsperger, J L
    Bechtold, P
    Chaboureau, J P
    Cheinet, S
    Grabowski, W
    Grenier, H
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kohler, M
    Piriou, J M
    Tailleux, R
    Tomasini, M
    Modelling the diurnal cycle of deep precipitating convection over land with cloud-resolving models and single-column models2004In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, ISSN 0035-9009, E-ISSN 1477-870X, Vol. 130, no 604, p. 3139-3172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An idealized case-study has been designed to investigate the modelling of the diurnal cycle of deep precipitating convection over land. A simulation of this case was performed by seven single-column models (SCMs) and three cloud-resolving models (CRMs). Within this framework, a quick onset of convective rainfall is found in most SCMs, consistent with the results from general-circulation models. In contrast, CRMs do not predict rainfall before noon. A joint analysis of the results provided by both types of model indicates that convection occurs too early in most SCMs, due to crude triggering criteria and quick onsets of convective precipitation. In the CRMs, the first clouds appear before noon, but surface rainfall is delayed by a few hours to several hours. This intermediate stage, missing in all SCMs except for one, is characterized by a gradual moistening of the free troposphere and an increase of cloud-top height. Later on, convective downdraughts efficiently cool and dry the boundary layer (BL) in the CRMs. This feature is also absent in most SCMs, which tend to adjust towards more unstable states, with moister (and often more cloudy) low levels and a drier free atmosphere. This common behaviour of most SCMs with respect to deep moist convective processes occurs even though each SCM simulates a different diurnal cycle of the BL and atmospheric stability. The scatter among the SCMs results from the wide variety of representations of BL turbulence and moist convection in these models. Greater consistency is found among the CRMs, despite some differences in their representation of the daytime BL growth, which are linked to their parametrizations of BL turbulence and/or resolution.

  • 15. Hazeleger, Wilco
    et al.
    Severijns, Camiel
    Semmler, Tido
    Stefanescu, Simona
    Yang, Shuting
    Wang, Xueli
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Dutra, Emanuel
    Baldasano, Jose M.
    Bintanja, Richard
    Bougeault, Philippe
    Caballero, Rodrigo
    Ekman, Annica M. L.
    Christensen, Jens H.
    van den Hurk, Bart
    Jimenez, Pedro
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kållberg, Per
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Koenigk, Torben
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    McGrath, Ray
    Miranda, Pedro
    Van Noije, Twan
    Palmer, Tim
    Parodi, Jose A.
    Schmith, Torben
    Selten, Frank
    Storelvmo, Trude
    Sterl, Andreas
    Tapamo, Honore
    Vancoppenolle, Martin
    Viterbo, Pedro
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    EC-Earth A Seamless Earth-System Prediction Approach in Action2010In: Bulletin of The American Meteorological Society - (BAMS), ISSN 0003-0007, E-ISSN 1520-0477, Vol. 91, no 10, p. 1357-1363Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16. Jacob, Daniela
    et al.
    Petersen, Juliane
    Eggert, Bastian
    Alias, Antoinette
    Christensen, Ole Bossing
    Bouwer, Laurens M.
    Braun, Alain
    Colette, Augustin
    Deque, Michel
    Georgievski, Goran
    Georgopoulou, Elena
    Gobiet, Andreas
    Menut, Laurent
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Haensler, Andreas
    Hempelmann, Nils
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Keuler, Klaus
    Kovats, Sari
    Kroener, Nico
    Kotlarski, Sven
    Kriegsmann, Arne
    Martin, Eric
    van Meijgaard, Erik
    Moseley, Christopher
    Pfeifer, Susanne
    Preuschmann, Swantje
    Radermacher, Christine
    Radtke, Kai
    Rechid, Diana
    Rounsevell, Mark
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Somot, Samuel
    Soussana, Jean-Francois
    Teichmann, Claas
    Valentini, Riccardo
    Vautard, Robert
    Weber, Bjorn
    Yiou, Pascal
    EURO-CORDEX: new high-resolution climate change projections for European impact research2014In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 563-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new high-resolution regional climate change ensemble has been established for Europe within the World Climate Research Program Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (EURO-CORDEX) initiative. The first set of simulations with a horizontal resolution of 12.5 km was completed for the new emission scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 with more simulations expected to follow. The aim of this paper is to present this data set to the different communities active in regional climate modelling, impact assessment and adaptation. The EURO-CORDEX ensemble results have been compared to the SRES A1B simulation results achieved within the ENSEMBLES project. The large-scale patterns of changes in mean temperature and precipitation are similar in all three scenarios, but they differ in regional details, which can partly be related to the higher resolution in EURO-CORDEX. The results strengthen those obtained in ENSEMBLES, but need further investigations. The analysis of impact indices shows that for RCP8.5, there is a substantially larger change projected for temperature-based indices than for RCP4.5. The difference is less pronounced for precipitation-based indices. Two effects of the increased resolution can be regarded as an added value of regional climate simulations. Regional climate model simulations provide higher daily precipitation intensities, which are completely missing in the global climate model simulations, and they provide a significantly different climate change of daily precipitation intensities resulting in a smoother shift from weak to moderate and high intensities.

  • 17. Jeong, Jee-Hoon
    et al.
    Walther, Alexander
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Chen, Deliang
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Diurnal cycle of precipitation amount and frequency in Sweden: observation versus model simulation2011In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 664-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the diurnal cycle of precipitation in Sweden using hourly ground observations for 1996-2008. General characteristics of phase and amplitude for the diurnal cycle of precipitation, both in amount and frequency, were identified. In the warm season (April-September), the 'typical' afternoon (14-16 LST) peaks are dominant over inland Sweden, whereas late night to early morning (04-06 LST) peaks with relatively weak amplitude are discernable in the east coast along the Baltic Sea. The diurnal variation is almost negligible in the cold season (October-March), due to the weak solar radiation at high latitudes. The variations of convective activity forced by solar heating and modulated by geographical characteristics were suggested as primarily factors to invoke the cycles and spatial variation identified. The observed cycle was compared with the cycle simulated by a regional climate model. The model fairly well captures the spatial pattern of the phase of the diurnal cycle. However, the warm season afternoon peak is simulated too early and too uniformly across the stations, associated with too frequent occurrences of convective rainfall events with relatively light intensity. These discrepancies point to the need to improve the convection parametrization and geographic representation of the model.

  • 18. Jiao, Yanjun
    et al.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Comparison Studies of Cloud- and Convection-Related Processes Simulated by the Canadian Regional Climate Model over the Pacific Ocean2008In: Monthly Weather Review, ISSN 0027-0644, E-ISSN 1520-0493, Vol. 136, no 11, p. 4168-4187Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Development of physical parameterizations for high resolution Climate models2005In: Extended abstracts of a WMO/WCRP-sponsored Regional-Scale Climate Modelling Workshop. / [ed] Bärring and Laprise, Department of Physical Geography & Ecosystems Analysis Lund University, Sweden , 2005, p. 37-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Jones, Colin
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willen, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The Rossby Centre Regional Atmospheric Climate Model part 1: Model climatology and performance for the present climate over Europe2004In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 33, no 4-5, p. 199-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rossby Centre Atmospheric Regional Climate Model (RCA2) is described and simulation results, for the present climate over Europe, are evaluated against available observations. Systematic biases in the models mean climate and climate variability are documented and key parameterization weaknesses identified. The quality of near-surface parameters is investigated in some detail, particularly temperature, precipitation, the surface energy budget and cloud cover. The model simulates the recent, observed climate and variability with a high degree of realism. Compensating errors in the components of the surface radiation budget are highlighted and the fundamental causes of these biases are traced to the relevant aspects of the cloud, precipitation and radiation parameterizations. The model has a tendency to precipitate too frequently at small rates, this has a direct impact on the simulation of cloud-radiation interaction and surface temperatures. Great care must be taken in the use of observations to evaluate high resolution RCMs, when they are forced by analyzed boundary conditions. This is particularly true with respect to precipitation and cloudiness, where observational uncertainty is often larger than the RCM bias.

  • 21.
    Jones, Colin
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willen, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The Rossby Centre regional atmospheric climate model part II: Application to the Arctic climate2004In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 33, no 4-5, p. 211-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rossby Centre regional climate model (RCA2) has been integrated over the Arctic Ocean as part of the international ARCMIP project. Results have been compared to observations derived from the SHEBA data set. The standard RCA2 model overpredicts cloud cover and downwelling longwave radiation, during the Arctic winter. This error was improved by introducing a new cloud parameterization, which significantly improves the annual cycle of cloud cover. Compensating biases between clear sky downwelling longwave radiation and longwave radiation emitted from cloud base were identified. Modifications have been introduced to the model radiation scheme that more accurately treat solar radiation interaction with ice crystals. This leads to a more realistic representation of cloud-solar radiation interaction. The clear sky portion of the model radiation code transmits too much solar radiation through the atmosphere, producing a positive bias at the top of the frequent boundary layer clouds. A realistic treatment of the temporally evolving albedo, of both sea-ice and snow, appears crucial for an accurate simulation of the net surface energy budget. Likewise, inclusion of a prognostic snow-surface temperature seems necessary, to accurately simulate near-surface thermodynamic processes in the Arctic.

  • 22.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    USE OF A HIGH-RESOLUTION CLOUD CLIMATE DATA SET FOR VALIDATION OF ROSSBY CENTRE CLIMATE SIMULATIONS2004In: 2004 EUMETSAT METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE CONFERENCE: Ocean and Climate Observations, EUMETSAT , 2004, p. 465-473Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Willen, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Evaluation of regional cloud climate simulations over Scandinavia using a 10-year NOAA advanced very high resolution radiometer cloud climatology2008In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-897X, E-ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 113, no D1, article id D01203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A satellite-derived (NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) cloud climatology over the Scandinavian region covering the period 1991 - 2001 has been used to evaluate the performance of cloud simulations of the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute Rossby Centre regional climate model (RCA3). Several methods of adapting the satellite and model data sets to allow a meaningful comparison were applied. RCA3-simulated total cloud cover was shown to agree within a few percent of the satellite-retrieved cloud amounts on seasonal and annual timescales. However, a substantial imbalance between the respective RCA3 contributions from low-, medium- and high-level clouds was seen. The differences from satellite-derived contributions were +2.4% for high-level clouds, -5.2% for medium-level clouds and +4.0% for low- level clouds. In addition, an overrepresentation of cloud categories with high optical thicknesses was seen for all vertical cloud groups, particularly during the summer season. Some specific features of the geographical distribution of cloudiness were also noticed. Most pronounced were the excess of cloud amounts over the Scandinavian mountain range and a deficit leeward of the mountains. The overall results imply problems with the RCA3-modeled surface radiation budget components by causing reduced incoming solar radiation and increased downwelling longwave radiation.

  • 24.
    Kjellström, Erik
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Bärring, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Gollvik, Stefan
    Meterologi.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    A 140-year simulation of European climate with the new version of the Rossby Centre regional atmospheric climate model (RCA3)2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents the latest version of the Rossby Centre regional atmospheric model, RCA3, with focus on model improvements since the earlier version, RCA2. The main changes in RCA3 relate to the treatment of land surface processes. Apart from the changes in land surface parameterizations several changes in the calculation of radiation, clouds, condensate and precipitation have been made. The new parameterizations hold a more realistic description of the climate system.Simulated present day climate is evaluated compared to observations. The new model version show equally good, or better, correspondence to observational climatologies as RCA2, when forced by perfect boundary conditions. Seasonal mean temperature errors are generally within ±1oC except during winter in north-western Russia where a larger positive bias is identified. Both the diurnal temperature range and the annual temperature range are found to be underestimated in the model. Precipitation biases are generally smaller than in the corresponding reanalysis data used as boundary conditions, showing the benefit of a higher horizontal resolution.The model is used for the regionalization of two transient global climate change projections for the time period 1961- 2100. The radiative forcing of the climate system is based on observed concentrations of greenhouse gases until 1990 and on the IPCC SRES B2 and A2 emissions scenarios for the remaining time period. Long-term averages as well as measures of the variability around these averages are presented for a number of variables including precipitation and near-surface temperature. It is shown that the changes in variability sometimes differ from the changes in averages. For instance, in north-eastern Europe, the mean increase in wintertime temperatures is followed by an even stronger reduction in the number of very cold days in winter. This kind of performance of the climate system implies that methods of inferring data from climate change projections to other periods than those actually simulated have to be used with care, at least when it comes to variables that are expected to change in a non-linear way. Further, these new regional climate change projections address the whole 21st century.

  • 25. Lenderink, G
    et al.
    Siebesma, A P
    Cheinet, S
    Irons, S
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Marquet, P
    Muller, F
    Olmeda, D
    Calvo, J
    Sanchez, E
    Soares, P M M
    The diurnal cycle of shallow cumulus clouds over land: A single-column model intercomparison study2004In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, ISSN 0035-9009, E-ISSN 1477-870X, Vol. 130, no 604, p. 3339-3364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An intercomparison study for single-column models (SCMs) of the diurnal cycle of shallow cumulus convection is reported. The case, based on measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program Southern Great Plains site on 21 June 1997, has been used in a large-eddy simulation intercomparison study before. Results of the SCMs reveal the following general deficiencies: too large values of cloud cover and Cloud liquid water, unrealistic thermodynamic profiles, and high amounts of numerical noise. Results are also strongly dependent on vertical resolution. These results are analysed in terms of the behaviour of the different parametrization schemes involved: the convection scheme, the turbulence scheme, and the cloud scheme. In general the behaviour of the SCMs can be grouped in two different classes: one class with too strong mixing by the turbulence scheme, the other class with too strong activity by the convection scheme. The coupling between (subcloud) turbulence and the convection scheme plays a crucial role. Finally, (in part) motivated by these results several models have been successfully updated with new parametrization schemes and/or their present schemes have been successfully modified.

  • 26.
    Lind, Petter
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Lindstedt, David
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Summer Precipitation over Central Europe in a Suite of High-Resolution Climate Models2016In: Journal of Climate, ISSN 0894-8755, E-ISSN 1520-0442, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 3501-3518Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Lindstedt, David
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Lind, Petter
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    A new regional climate model operating at the meso-gamma scale: performance over Europe2015In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 67, article id 24138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are well-known difficulties to run numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models at resolutions traditionally referred to as 'grey-zone' (similar to 3-8 km) where deep convection is neither completely resolved by the model dynamics nor completely subgrid. In this study, we describe the performance of an operational NWP model, HARMONIE, in a climate setting (HCLIM), run at two different resolutions (6 and 15 km) for a 10-yr period (1998-2007). This model has a convection scheme particularly designed to operate in the 'grey-zone' regime, which increases the realism and accuracy of the time and spatial evolution of convective processes compared to more traditional parametrisations. HCLIM is evaluated against standard observational data sets over Europe as well as high-resolution, regional, observations. Not only is the regional climate very well represented but also higher order climate statistics and smaller scale spatial characteristics of precipitation are in good agreement with observations. The added value when making climate simulations at similar to 5 km resolution compared to more typical regional climate model resolutions is mainly seen for the very rare, high-intensity precipitation events. HCLIM at 6 km resolution reproduces the frequency and intensity of these events better than at 15 km resolution and is in closer agreement with the high-resolution observations.

  • 28. Markovic, Marko
    et al.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Vaillancourt, Paul A.
    Paquin, Dominique
    Winger, Katja
    Paquin-Ricard, Danahe
    An evaluation of the surface radiation budget over North America for a suite of regional climate models against surface station observations2008In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 31, no 7-8, p. 779-794Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Michelson, Daniel
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Collier, C G
    Haase, Gunther
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Heen, M
    'Down-to-Earth' modelling of equivalent surface precipitation using multisource data and radar2005In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, ISSN 0035-9009, E-ISSN 1477-870X, Vol. 131, no 607, p. 1093-1112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The estimation of surface rainfall from reflectivity data derived from weather radar has been much studied over many years. It is now clear that central to this problem is the adjustment of these data for the impacts of vertical variations in the reflectivity. In this paper a new procedure (known as Down-to-Earth, DTE) is proposed and tested for combining radar measurements aloft with information from a numerical weather-prediction (NWP) model and an analysis system. The procedure involves the exploitation of moist cloud physics in an attempt to account for physical processes impacting on precipitation during its descent from the height of radar echo measurements to the surface. The application of DTE leads to increased underestimation in the radar measurements compared to precipitation gauge observations at short and intermediate radar ranges (0-120 km), but is successful at reducing the bias at further ranges. However the application of DTE does not lead to significant decreases in the random error of the surface rain rate estimate. No improvement is made when attempting to account for the precipitation phase measured by radar. It is concluded that further work on radar data quality control, along with improvements to the NWP model, are essential to improve upon results using such a physically based procedure.

  • 30.
    Michelson, Daniel
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Collier, C. G.
    Attempts to parameterize cloud water profiles using a neural network2004In: Atmospheric Science Letters, ISSN 1530-261X, E-ISSN 1530-261X, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 141-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atmospheric state variables from a Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model are combined with analyzed cloud base heights in a neural network, with the objective to model corresponding cloud water profiles. It was found that the neural network was incapable of resolving the inherently non-linear vertical cloud water distributions. Copyright (C) 2004 Royal Meteorological Society

  • 31. Navarro-Ortega, Alicia
    et al.
    Acuna, Vicenc
    Bellin, Alberto
    Burek, Peter
    Cassiani, Giorgio
    Choukr-Allah, Redouane
    Doledec, Sylvain
    Elosegi, Arturo
    Ferrari, Federico
    Ginebreda, Antoni
    Grathwohl, Peter
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Rault, Philippe Ker
    Kok, Kasper
    Koundouri, Phoebe
    Ludwig, Ralf Peter
    Merz, Ralf
    Milacic, Radmila
    Munoz, Isabel
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Paniconi, Claudio
    Paunovic, Momir
    Petrovic, Mira
    Sabater, Laia
    Sabater, Sergi
    Skoulikidis, Nikolaos Th.
    Slob, Adriaan
    Teutsch, Georg
    Voulvoulis, Nikolaos
    Barcelo, Damia
    Managing the effects of multiple stressors on aquatic ecosystems under water scarcity. The GLOBAQUA project2015In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 503, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water scarcity is a serious environmental problem in many European regions, and will likely increase in the near future as a consequence of increased abstraction and climate change. Water scarcity exacerbates the effects of multiple stressors, and thus results in decreased water quality. It impacts river ecosystems, threatens the services they provide, and it will force managers and policy-makers to change their current practices. The EU-FP7 project GLOBAQUA aims at identifying the prevalence, interaction and linkages between stressors, and to assess their effects on the chemical and ecological status of freshwater ecosystems in order to improve water management practice and policies. GLOBAQUA assembles a multidisciplinary team of 21 European plus 2 non-European scientific institutions, as well as water authorities and river basin managers. The project includes experts in hydrology, chemistry, biology, geomorphology, modelling, socio-economics, governance science, knowledge brokerage, and policy advocacy. GLOBAQUA studies six river basins (Ebro, Adige, Sava, Evrotas, Anglian and Souss Massa) affected by water scarcity, and aims to answer the following questions: how does water scarcity interact with other existing stressors in the study river basins? How will these interactions change according to the different scenarios of future global change? Which will be the foreseeable consequences for river ecosystems? How will these in turn affect the services the ecosystems provide? How should management and policies be adapted to minimise the ecological, economic and societal consequences? These questions will be approached by combining data-mining, field- and laboratory-based research, and modelling. Here, we outline the general structure of the project and the activities to be conducted within the fourteen work-packages of GLOBAQUA. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 32.
    Nikulin, Grigory
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Giorgi, Filippo
    Asrar, Ghassem
    Buechner, Matthias
    Cerezo-Mota, Ruth
    Christensen, Ole Bossing
    Deque, Michel
    Fernandez, Jesus
    Haensler, Andreas
    van Meijgaard, Erik
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Sylla, Mouhamadou Bamba
    Sushama, Laxmi
    Precipitation Climatology in an Ensemble of CORDEX-Africa Regional Climate Simulations2012In: Journal of Climate, ISSN 0894-8755, E-ISSN 1520-0442, Vol. 25, no 18, p. 6057-6078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ensemble of regional climate simulations is analyzed to evaluate the ability of 10 regional climate models (RCMs) and their ensemble average to simulate precipitation over Africa. All RCMs use a similar domain and spatial resolution of similar to 50 km and are driven by the ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) (1989-2008). They constitute the first set of simulations in the Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment in Africa (CORDEX-Africa) project. Simulated precipitation is evaluated at a range of time scales, including seasonal means, and annual and diurnal cycles, against a number of detailed observational datasets. All RCMs simulate the seasonal mean and annual cycle quite accurately, although individual models can exhibit significant biases in some subregions and seasons. The multimodel average generally outperforms any individual simulation, showing biases of similar magnitude to differences across a number of observational datasets. Moreover, many of the RCMs significantly improve the precipitation climate compared to that from their boundary condition dataset, that is, ERA-Interim. A common problem in the majority of the RCMs is that precipitation is triggered too early during the diurnal cycle, although a small subset of models does have a reasonable representation of the phase of the diurnal cycle. The systematic bias in the diurnal cycle is not improved when the ensemble mean is considered. Based on this performance analysis, it is assessed that the present set of RCMs can be used to provide useful information on climate projections over Africa.

  • 33.
    Nikulin, Grigory
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Strandberg, Gustav
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Nordic weather extremes as simulated by the Rossby Centre Regional Climate Model: model evaluation and future projections2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Nikulin, Grigory
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Uncertainties in the projected climate changes of wind extremes over the Baltic region2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35. Paquin-Ricard, Danahe
    et al.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Vaillancourt, Paul A.
    Using ARM Observations to Evaluate Cloud and Clear-Sky Radiation Processes as Simulated by the Canadian Regional Climate Model GEM2010In: Monthly Weather Review, ISSN 0027-0644, E-ISSN 1520-0493, Vol. 138, no 3, p. 818-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The total downwelling shortwave (SWID) and longwave (LWD) radiation and its components are assessed for the limited-area version of the Global Environmental Multiscale Model (GEM-LAM) against Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) at two sites: the southern Great Plains (SGP) and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) for the 1998-2005 period. The model and observed SWD and LWD are evaluated as a function of the cloud fraction (CF), that is, for overcast and clear-sky conditions separately, to isolate and analyze different interactions between radiation and 1) atmospheric aerosols and water vapor and 2) cloud liquid water. Through analysis of the mean diurnal cycle and normalized frequency distributions of surface radiation fluxes, the primary radiation error in GEM-LAM is seen to be an excess in SWD in the middle of the day. The SWD bias results from a combination of underestimated CF and clouds, when present, possessing a too-high solar transmissivity, which is particularly the case for optically thin clouds. Concurrent with the SWD bias, a near-surface warm bias develops in GEM-LAM, particularly at the SGP site in the summer. The ultimate cause of this warm bias is difficult to uniquely determine because of the range of complex interactions between the surface, atmospheric, and radiation processes that are involved. Possible feedback loops influencing this warm bias are discussed. The near-surface warm bias is the primary cause of an excess clear-sky LWD. This excess is partially balanced with respect to the all-sky LWD by an underestimated CF, which causes a negative bias in simulated all-sky emissivity. It is shown that there is a strong interaction between all the components influencing the simulated surface radiation fluxes with frequent error compensation, emphasizing the need to evaluate the individual radiation components at high time frequency.

  • 36. Pryor, S. C.
    et al.
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Influence of spatial resolution on regional climate model derived wind climates2012In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-897X, E-ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 117, article id D03117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wind speeds for a nominal height of 10 m and from the lowest model level (similar to 70 m above ground level) from the Rossby Center regional climate model (RCM) (RCA3) run at four resolutions between approximately 50 x 50 km and 6 x 6 km are analyzed to assess the effect of model resolution on wind climates. The influence of model resolution in this topographically simple subdomain of northern Europe is more profound in the wind extremes than in the central tendency. The domain-averaged mean wind speed at 10 m increases by 5% as the resolution increases from 50 to 6.25 km, while the 50 year return period wind speed and wind gust at this height increase by over 10% and 24%, respectively. Larger changes are observed in these wind speed metrics at the lowest model level as model resolution increases (similar to+10% in the mean and similar to+20% in the 50 year return period wind speed). These differences are of similar magnitude to the climate change signal in extreme wind events derived in prior research and may have implications for climate change risk and vulnerability analyses. Output from the lowest model level indicates some evidence for increased variability at synoptic and meso-alpha time scales with increased model resolution, but the effect is nonlinear. Furthermore, analysis of power spectra of grid cell average and tile fraction wind speeds at 10 m does not support the assertion that increased model resolution increases model skill at synoptic and meso-a time scales relative to in situ observations.

  • 37. Qian, Minwei
    et al.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Laprise, Rene
    Caya, Daniel
    The Influences of NAO and the Hudson Bay sea-ice on the climate of eastern Canada2008In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 31, no 2-3, p. 169-182Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Rummukainen, Markku
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Doescher, Ralf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Graham, Phil
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Räisänen, Jouni
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    PRUDENCE-related regional climate modeling at the SMHI/Rossby Centre2002In: PRUDENCE kick-off meeting / [ed] Jens Hesselbjerg Christensen, Danish Climate Centre DMI, Ministry of Transport , 2002, p. 40-41Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Rummukainen, Markku
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Räisänen, Jouni
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Bringfelt, Björn
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Omstedt, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Willen, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    A regional climate model for northern Europe: model description and results from the downscaling of two GCM control simulations2001In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 17, no 5-6, p. 339-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents a regional climate model, the Rossby Centre regional Atmospheric model(RCA1), recently developed from the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM). The changes in the HIRLAM parametrizations, necessary for climate-length integrations, are described. A regional Baltic Sea ocean model and a modeling system for the Nordic inland lake systems have been coupled with RCA1. The coupled system has been used to downscale 10-year time slices from two different general circulation model (GCM) simulations to provide high-resolution regional interpretation of large-scale modeling. A selection of the results from the control runs, i.e. the present-day climate simulations, are presented: large-scale free atmospheric fields, the surface temperature and precipitation results and results for the on-line simulated regional ocean and lake surface climates. The regional model modifies the surface climate description compared to the GCM simulations, but it is also substantially affected by the biases in the GCM simulations. The regional model also improves the representation of the regional ocean and the inland lakes, compared to the GCM results.

  • 40.
    Räisänen, Jouni
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Hansson, U
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Doescher, Ralf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Graham, Phil
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willen, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    European climate in the late twenty-first century: regional simulations with two driving global models and two forcing scenarios2004In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 13-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A basic analysis is presented for a series of regional climate change simulations that were conducted by the Swedish Rossby Centre and contribute to the PRUDENCE (Prediction of Regional scenarios and Uncertainties for Defining EuropeaN Climate change risks and Effects) project. For each of the two driving global models HadAM3H and ECHAM4/OPYC3, a 30-year control run and two 30-year scenario runs (based on the SRES A2 and B2 emission scenarios) were made with the regional model. In this way, four realizations of climate change from 1961-1990 to 2071-2100 were obtained. The simulated changes are larger for the A2 than the B2 scenario (although with few qualitative differences) and in most cases in the ECHAM4/OPYC3-driven (RE) than in the HadAM3H-driven (RH) regional simulations. In all the scenario runs, the warming in northern Europe is largest in winter or late autumn. In central and southern Europe, the warming peaks in summer when it locally reaches 10 degreesC in the RE-A2 simulation and 6-7 degreesC in the RH-A2 and RE-B2 simulations. The four simulations agree on a general increase in precipitation in northern Europe especially in winter and on a general decrease in precipitation in southern and central Europe in summer, but the magnitude and the geographical patterns of the change differ markedly between RH and RE. This reflects very different changes in the atmospheric circulation during the winter half-year, which also lead to quite different simulated changes in windiness. All four simulations show a large increase in the lowest minimum temperatures in northern, central and eastern Europe, most likely due to reduced snow cover. Extreme daily precipitation increases even in most of those areas where the mean annual precipitation decreases.

  • 41.
    Räisänen, Jouni
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Doescher, Ralf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Graham, Phil
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    GCM driven simulations of recent and future climate with the Rossby Centre coupled atmosphere - Baltic Sea regional climate model RCAO2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of six general circulation model (GCM) driven regional climate simulations made at the Rossby Centre, SMHI, during the year 2002 are documented. For both the two driving GCMs HadAM3H andECHAM4/OPYC3, a 30-year (1961-1990) control run and two 30-year (2071-2100) scenario runs have been made. The scenario runs are based on the IPCC SRES A2 and B2 forcing scenarios. These simulations were made at 49 km atmospheric resolution and they are part of the European PRUDENCE project.Many aspects of the simulated control climates compare favourably with observations, but some problems are also evident. For example, the simulated cloudiness and precipitation appear generally too abundant in northern Europe (although biases in precipitation measurements complicate the interpretation), whereas too clear and dry conditions prevail in southern Europe. There is a lot of similarity between the HadAM3Hdriven (RCAO-H) and ECHAM4/OPYC3-driven (RCAO-E) control simulations, although the problems associated with the hydrological cycle and cloudiness are somewhat larger in the latter.The simulated climate changes (2071-2100 minus 1961-1990) depend on both the forcing scenario (the changes are generally larger for A2 than B2) and the driving global model (the largest changes tend to occur in RCAO-E). In all the scenario simulations, the warming in northern Europe is largest in winter or autumn. In central and southern Europe, the warming peaks in summer and reaches in the RCAO-E A2 simulation locally 10°C. The four simulations agree on a general increase in precipitation in northern Europe especiallyin winter and on a general decrease in precipitation in southern and central Europe in summer, but the magnitude and the geographical patterns of the change differ a lot between RCAO-H and RCAO-E. Thisreflects very different changes in the atmospheric circulation during the winter half-year, which also have a large impact on the simulated changes in windiness. A very large increase in the lowest minimumtemperatures occurs in a large part of Europe, most probably due to reduced snow cover. Extreme daily precipitation increases even in most of those areas where the mean annual precipitation decreases.

  • 42.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Gollvik, Stefan
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jansson, Christer
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The Rossby Centre Regional Climate model RCA3: model description and performance2011In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, no 1, p. 4-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Gollvik, Stefan
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The Rossby Centre Regional Climate Model RCA3: Model description and performance2011In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 63A, no 1, p. 4-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Applying the Rossby Centre Regional Climate Model (RCA3.5) over the ENSEMBLES-AMMA region: Sensitivity studies and future scenarios2009In: / [ed] Rockel, B., Bärring, L and Reckermann, M., 2009, p. 217-218Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Sheldon, Johnston, Marston
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Eriksson, P.
    Eliasson, Salomon
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Forbes, R. M.
    Murtagh, D. P.
    The representation of tropical upper tropospheric water in EC Earth V22012In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 39, no 11, p. 2713-2731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tropical upper tropospheric humidity, clouds, and ice water content, as well as outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), are evaluated in the climate model EC Earth with the aid of satellite retrievals. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and Microwave Limb Sounder together provide good coverage of relative humidity. EC Earth's relative humidity is in fair agreement with these observations. CloudSat and CALIPSO data are combined to provide cloud fractions estimates throughout the altitude region considered (500-100 hPa). EC Earth is found to overestimate the degree of cloud cover above 200 hPa and underestimate it below. Precipitating and non-precipitating EC Earth ice definitions are combined to form a complete ice water content. EC Earth's ice water content is below the uncertainty range of CloudSat above 250 hPa, but can be twice as high as CloudSat's estimate in the melting layer. CERES data show that the model underestimates the impact of clouds on OLR, on average with about 9 W m(-2). Regionally, EC Earth's outgoing longwave radiation can be similar to 20 W m(-2) higher than the observation. A comparison to ERA-Interim provides further perspectives on the model's performance. Limitations of the satellite observations are emphasised and their uncertainties are, throughout, considered in the analysis. Evaluating multiple model variables in parallel is a more ambitious approach than is customary.

  • 46. Siebesma, A P
    et al.
    Jakob, C
    Lenderink, G
    Neggers, R A J
    Teixeira, J
    Van Meijgaard, E
    Calvo, J
    Chlond, A
    Grenier, H
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kohler, M
    Kitagawa, H
    Marquet, P
    Lock, A P
    Muller, F
    Olmeda, D
    Severijns, C
    Cloud representation in general-circulation models over the northern Pacific Ocean: A EUROCS intercomparison study2004In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, ISSN 0035-9009, E-ISSN 1477-870X, Vol. 130, no 604, p. 3245-3267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EUROCS (EUROpean Cloud Systems study) project aims to improve the treatment of cloud systems in regional and global climate and weather prediction models. This paper reports an intercomparison study of cloud representation over the Pacific Ocean for nine climate and weather prediction models. The study consists of an analysis of a June/July/August 1998 period along an idealized trajectory over the Pacific Ocean that encompasses both the ascending and descending branch of the Hadley circulation. The three cloud types that are studied by EUROCS, stratocumulus, shallow cumulus and deep-convective cloud systems, do all occur in a persistent and geographically separated way, along this trajectory. The main focus of this study is on processes related to the hydrological cycle within the Hadley circulation. These include the large-scale dynamics (i.e. the strength of the up- and downwelling branches of the Hadley cell), the cloud processes (i.e. cloud cover, cloud amounts and precipitation), and the impact of these processes on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere and at the ocean's surface. In order to make a quantitative assessment, special care has been taken to select reliable observational datasets. The main conclusions are that (1) almost all models strongly underpredicted both cloud cover and cloud amount in the stratocumulus regions while (2) the situation is opposite in the trade-wind region and the tropics where cloud cover and cloud amount are overpredicted by most models. These deficiencies result in an overprediction of the downwelling surface short-wave radiation of typically 60 W m(-2) in the stratocumulus regimes and a similar underprediction of 60 W m(-2) in the trade-wind regions and in the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). Similar biases for the short-wave radiation were found at the top of the atmosphere, while discrepancies in the outgoing long-wave radiation are most pronounced in the ITCZ.

  • 47.
    Strandberg, Gustav
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Bärring, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jansson, Christer
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kupiainen, Marco
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    CORDEX scenarios for Europe from the Rossby Centre regional climate model RCA42015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report documents Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) climate model simulations at 50 km horizontal resolution over Europe with the Rossby Centre regional atmospheric model (RCA4) for i) a ERA-Interim-driven (ERAINT) simulation used to evaluate model performance in the recent past climate, ii) historical simulations of the recent decades with forcing from nine different global climate models (GCMs) and iii) future scenarios RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 forced by the same nine different GCMs. Those simulations represent a subset of all CORDEX simulations produced at the Rossby Centre and a general conclusion drawn at the Rossby Centre is that such large ensembles could not have been produced without the establishment of an efficient production chain as outlined here. The first part of this report documents RCA4 and its performance in a perfect boundary simulation where ERAINT was downscaled. RCA4 is to a large extent replicating the large-scale circulation in ERAINT, but some local biases in mean sea level pressure appear. In general the seasonal cycles of temperature and precipitation are simulated in relatively close agreement to observations. Some biases occur, such as too much precipitation in northern Europe and too little in the south. In winter, there is also too much precipitation in eastern Europe. Temperatures are generally biased low in northern Europe and in the Mediterranean region in winter while overestimated temperatures are seen in southeastern Europe in winter and in the Mediterranean area in summer. RCA4 performs generally well when simulating the recent past climate taking boundary conditions from the GCMs. A large part of the RCA4 simulated climate is attributed to the driving GCMs, but RCA4 creates its own climate inside the model domain and adds details due to higher resolution. All nine downscaled GCMs share problems in their representation of the large-scale circulation in winter. This feature is inherited in RCA4. The biases in large-scale circulation induce some biases in temperature and precipitation in RCA4. The climate change signal in the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 ensembles simulated by RCA4 is very similar to what has been presented previously. Both scenarios RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 project Europe to be warmer in the future. In winter the warming is largest in northern Europe and in summer in southern Europe. The summer maximum daily temperature increases in a way similar to summer temperature, but somewhat more in southern Europe. The winter minimum daily temperature in northern Europe is the temperature that changes the most. Precipitation is projected to increase in all seasons in northern Europe and decrease in southern Europe. The largest amount of rainfall per day (and per seven day period) is projected to increase in almost all of Europe and in all seasons. At the same time the longest period without precipitation is projected to be longer in southern Europe. Small changes in mean wind speed are generally projected. There are, however, regions with significant changes in wind. The ensemble approach is a way to describe the uncertainties in the scenarios, but there are other possible ensembles using other models which would give other results. Still, the ensemble used here is found to be similar enough to these other possible ensembles to be representative of the whole set of GCMs. Dynamical downscaling using RCA4 changes the climate change signal, and the ensemble spread is sometimes reduced, but the ensemble of nine RCA4 simulations, using different GCMs, is considered to be representative of the full ensemble. All scenarios agree on a climate change pattern; the amplitude of the change is determined by the choice of scenario. The relative importance of the chosen scenario increases with time.

  • 48.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Kahnert, Michael
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Andersson, Camilla
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Kokkola, H.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Langner, Joakim
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Integration of prognostic aerosol-cloud interactions in a chemistry transport model coupled offline to a regional climate model2015In: Geoscientific Model Development, ISSN 1991-959X, E-ISSN 1991-9603, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 1885-1898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To reduce uncertainties and hence to obtain a better estimate of aerosol (direct and indirect) radiative forcing, next generation climate models aim for a tighter coupling between chemistry transport models and regional climate models and a better representation of aerosol-cloud interactions. In this study, this coupling is done by first forcing the Rossby Center regional climate model (RCA4) with ERA-Interim lateral boundaries and sea surface temperature (SST) using the standard cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) formulation (hereafter, referred to as the 'stand-alone RCA4 version' or 'CTRL' simulation). In the stand-alone RCA4 version, CDNCs are constants distinguishing only between land and ocean surface. The meteorology from this simulation is then used to drive the chemistry transport model, Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH), which is coupled online with the aerosol dynamics model, Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications (SALSA). CDNC fields obtained from MATCH-SALSA are then fed back into a new RCA4 simulation. In this new simulation (referred to as 'MOD' simulation), all parameters remain the same as in the first run except for the CDNCs provided by MATCH-SALSA. Simulations are carried out with this model setup for the period 2005-2012 over Europe, and the differences in cloud microphysical properties and radiative fluxes as a result of local CDNC changes and possible model responses are analysed. Our study shows substantial improvements in cloud microphysical properties with the input of the MATCH-SALSA derived 3-D CDNCs compared to the stand-alone RCA4 version. This model setup improves the spatial, seasonal and vertical distribution of CDNCs with a higher concentration observed over central Europe during boreal summer (JJA) and over eastern Europe and Russia during winter (DJF). Realistic cloud droplet radii (CD radii) values have been simulated with the maxima reaching 13 mu m, whereas in the stand-alone version the values reached only 5 mu m. A substantial improvement in the distribution of the cloud liquid-water paths (CLWP) was observed when compared to the satellite retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the boreal summer months. The median and standard deviation values from the 'MOD' simulation are closer to observations than those obtained using the stand-alone RCA4 version. These changes resulted in a significant decrease in the total annual mean net fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) by -5 W m(-2) over the domain selected in the study. The TOA net fluxes from the 'MOD' simulation show a better agreement with the retrievals from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument. The aerosol indirect effects are estimated in the 'MOD' simulation in comparison to the pre-industrial aerosol emissions (1900). Our simulations estimated the domain averaged annual mean total radiative forcing of -0.64 W m(-2) with a larger contribution from the first indirect aerosol effect (-0.57 W m(-2)) than from the second indirect aerosol effect (-0.14 W m(-2)).

  • 49. Tjernstrom, M
    et al.
    Zagar, M
    Svensson, G
    Cassano, J J
    Pfeifer, S
    Rinke, A
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Dethloff, K
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Semmler, T
    Shaw, M
    Modelling the arctic boundary layer: An evaluation of six arcmip regional-scale models using data from the Sheba project2005In: Boundary-layer Meteorology, ISSN 0006-8314, E-ISSN 1573-1472, Vol. 117, no 2, p. 337-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A primary climate change signal in the central Arctic is the melting of sea ice. This is dependent on the interplay between the atmosphere and the sea ice, which is critically dependent on the exchange of momentum, heat and moisture at the surface. In assessing the realism of climate change scenarios it is vital to know the quality by which these exchanges are modelled in climate simulations. Six state-of-the-art regional-climate models are run for one year in the western Arctic, on a common domain that encompasses the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment ice-drift track. Surface variables, surface fluxes and the vertical structure of the lower troposphere are evaluated using data from the SHEBA experiment. All the models are driven by the same lateral boundary conditions, sea-ice fraction and sea and sea-ice surface temperatures. Surface pressure, near-surface air temperature, specific humidity and wind speed agree well with observations, with a falling degree of accuracy in that order. Wind speeds have systematic biases in some models, by as much as a few metres per second. The surface radiation fluxes are also surprisingly accurate, given the complexity of the problem. The turbulent momentum flux is acceptable, on average, in most models, but the turbulent heat fluxes are, however, mostly unreliable. Their correlation with observed fluxes is, in principle, insignificant, and they accumulate over a year to values an order of magnitude larger than observed. Typical instantaneous errors are easily of the same order of magnitude as the observed net atmospheric heat flux. In the light of the sensitivity of the atmosphere-ice interaction to errors in these fluxes, the ice-melt in climate change scenarios must be viewed with considerable caution.

  • 50. Tjernström, M.
    et al.
    Zagar, M.
    Svensson, G.
    Dethloff, K.
    Rinke, A.
    Cassano, J.
    Pfeifer, S.
    Semmler, T.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The Arctic boundary-layer in six different RCM compared to SHEBA observations (ARCMIP).2005In: Extended abstracts of a WMO/WCRP-sponsored Regional-Scale Climate Modelling Workshop [Elektronisk resurs] : high-resolution climate modelling : assessment, added value and applications, Lund, Sweden, 29 March-2 April 2004 / [ed] Lars Bärring & René Laprise, Lund: Department of Physical Geography & Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University , 2005, p. 44-45Conference paper (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 59
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