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  • 51. Tourigny, Etienne
    et al.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    An analysis of regional climate model performance over the tropical Americas. Part I: simulating seasonal variability of precipitation associated with ENSO forcing2009In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 323-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies associated with El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) constitute a major source of predictability in the tropics. We evaluate the ability of a regional climate model (the Rossby Centre Atmospheric Model; RCA) to downscale SST and large-scale atmospheric anomalies associated with ENSO. RCA is configured over the tropical east Pacific and tropical Americas and runs for the period 1979-2005, using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) lateral and surface boundary conditions. We study the ability of RCA to represent regional patterns of precipitation, with respect to both the climatology and interannual variability associated with ENSO. The latter is achieved by grouping the simulations into El Nino and La Nina composites and studying the delayed response of precipitation to SST forcing in four regions of Central and South America. In this paper, we concentrate on seasonal mean timescales. We find that RCA accurately simulates the main features of the precipitation climatology over the four regions and also reproduces the majority of the documented regional responses to ENSO forcing. Furthermore, the model captures the variability in precipitation anomalies between different ENSO events. The model exhibits a wet bias over the northern Amazon and slightly overestimates the magnitude of ENSO anomalies over Central America.

  • 52. Tourigny, Etienne
    et al.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    An analysis of regional climate model performance over the tropical Americas. Part II: simulating subseasonal variability of precipitation associated with ENSO forcing2009In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 343-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) constitutes a major source of potential predictability in the tropics. The majority of past seasonal prediction studies have concentrated on precipitation anomalies at the seasonal mean timescale. However, fields such as agriculture and water resource management require higher time frequency forecasts of precipitation variability. Regional climate models (RCMs), with their increased resolution, may offer one means of improving general circulation model forecasts of higher time frequency precipitation variability. Part I of this study evaluated the ability of the Rossby Centre regional atmospheric model (RCA), forced by analysed boundary conditions, to simulate seasonal mean precipitation anomalies over the tropical Americas associated with ENSO variability. In this paper the same integrations are analysed, with the focus now on precipitation anomalies at subseasonal (pentad) timescales. RCA simulates the climatological annual cycle of pentad-mean precipitation intensity quite accurately. The timing of the rainy season (onset, demise and length) is well simulated, with biases generally of less than 2 weeks. Changes in the timing and duration of the rainy season, associated with ENSO forcing, are also well captured. Finally, pentad-mean rainfall intensity distributions are simulated quite accurately, as are shifts in these distributions associated with ENSO forcing.

  • 53. Walther, Alexander
    et al.
    Jeong, Jee-Hoon
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Chen, Deliang
    Evaluation of the warm season diurnal cycle of precipitation over Sweden simulated by the Rossby Centre regional climate model RCA32013In: Atmospheric research, ISSN 0169-8095, E-ISSN 1873-2895, Vol. 119, p. 131-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the diurnal cycle of precipitation over Sweden for the warm season (April to September) both in hourly observational data and in simulations from the Rossby Centre regional climate model (RCA3). A series of parallel long-term simulations of RCA3 with different horizontal resolutions - 50, 25, 12, and 6 km - were analyzed to investigate the sensitivity of the model's horizontal resolution to the simulated diurnal cycle of precipitation. Overall, a clear distinction between an afternoon peak for inland stations and an early morning peak for stations along the Eastern coast is commonly found both in observation and model results. However, the diurnal cycle estimated from the model simulations show too early afternoon peaks with too large amplitude compared to the observation. Increasing horizontal model resolution tends to reduce this bias both in peak timing and amplitude, but this resolution effect seems not to be monotonic; this is clearly seen only when comparing coarser resolution results with the 6 km resolution result. As the resolution increases, the peak timing and amplitude of the diurnal cycle of resolved large-scale precipitation become more similar to the observed cycle of total precipitation while the contribution of subgrid scale convective precipitation to the total precipitation decreases. An increase in resolution also tends to reduce too much precipitation of relatively light intensity over inland compared to the observation, which may also contribute to the more realistic simulation of the afternoon peak in convective precipitation. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 54.
    Willén, Ulrika
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Baltink, Henk Klein
    Quante, Markus
    COMPARISON OF MODEL AND CLOUD RADAR DERIVED CLOUD OVERLAP2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Wyser, Klaus
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Modeled and observed clouds during Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA)2005In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-897X, E-ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 110, no D9, article id D09207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [1] Observed monthly mean cloud cover from the SHEBA site is found to differ by a substantial amount during winter depending on cloud observing instrument. This makes it difficult for climate modelers to evaluate modeled clouds and improve parameterizations. Many instruments and human observers cannot properly detect the thinnest clouds and count them as clear sky instead, resulting in too low cloud cover. To study the impact from the difficulties in the detection of thin clouds, we compute cloud cover in our model with a filter that removes the thinnest clouds. Optical thickness is used as a proxy to identify thin clouds as we are mainly interested in the impact of clouds on radiation. With the results from a regional climate model simulation of the Arctic, we can reproduce the large variability in wintertime cloud cover between instruments when assuming different cloud detection thresholds. During winter a large fraction of all clouds are optically thin, which causes the large sensitivity to filtering by optical thickness. During summer, most clouds are far above the optical thickness threshold and filtering has no effect. A fair comparison between observed and modeled cloud cover should account for thin clouds that may be present in models but absent in the observational data set. Difficulties with the proper identification of clouds and clear sky also has an effect on cloud radiative forcing. The derived clear-sky longwave flux at the surface can vary by some W m(-2) depending on the lower limit for the optical thickness of clouds. This impacts on the "observed'' LW cloud radiative forcing and suggests great care is needed in using satellite-derived cloud radiative forcing for model development.

  • 56.
    Wyser, Klaus
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Du, P.
    Girard, E.
    Willen, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Cassano, J.
    Christensen, J. H.
    Curry, J. A.
    Dethloff, K.
    Haugen, J. -E
    Jacob, D.
    Koltzow, M.
    Laprise, R.
    Lynch, A.
    Pfeifer, S.
    Rinke, A.
    Serreze, M.
    Shaw, M. J.
    Tjernstrom, M.
    Zagar, M.
    An evaluation of Arctic cloud and radiation processes during the SHEBA year: simulation results from eight Arctic regional climate models2008In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 30, no 2-3, p. 203-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eight atmospheric regional climate models (RCMs) were run for the period September 1997 to October 1998 over the western Arctic Ocean. This period was coincident with the observational campaign of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project. The RCMs shared common domains, centred on the SHEBA observation camp, along with a common model horizontal resolution, but differed in their vertical structure and physical parameterizations. All RCMs used the same lateral and surface boundary conditions. Surface downwelling solar and terrestrial radiation, surface albedo, vertically integrated water vapour, liquid water path and cloud cover from each model are evaluated against the SHEBA observation data. Downwelling surface radiation, vertically integrated water vapour and liquid water path are reasonably well simulated at monthly and daily timescales in the model ensemble mean, but with considerable differences among individual models. Simulated surface albedos are relatively accurate in the winter season, but become increasingly inaccurate and variable in the melt season, thereby compromising the net surface radiation budget. Simulated cloud cover is more or less uncorrelated with observed values at the daily timescale. Even for monthly averages, many models do not reproduce the annual cycle correctly. The inter-model spread of simulated cloud-cover is very large, with no model appearing systematically superior. Analysis of the co-variability of terms controlling the surface radiation budget reveal some of the key processes requiring improved treatment in Arctic RCMs. Improvements in the parameterization of cloud amounts and surface albedo are most urgently needed to improve the overall performance of RCMs in the Arctic.

  • 57.
    Wyser, Klaus
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Modelling clouds and radiation in the Arctic2005In: Extended abstracts of a WMO/WCRP-sponsored Regional-Scale Climate Modelling Workshop [Elektronisk resurs] : high-resolution climate modelling : assessment, added value and applications / [ed] Lars Bärring & René Laprise, Lund: Department of Physical Geography & Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University , 2005, p. 128-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Wyser, Klaus
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Modelling clouds and radiation in the ARctic.2004In: 14th International conference on clouds and precipitation, 2004, p. 1442-1445Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59. Zadra, Ayrton
    et al.
    Caya, Daniel
    Coté, Jean
    Dugas, Bernard
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Laprise, René
    Winger, Katja
    Caron, Louis-Philippe
    The next Canadian Regional Climate Model.2008In: Physics in Canada, Vol. 64, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
12 51 - 59 of 59
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