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  • 301. Dee, D. P.
    et al.
    Uppala, S. M.
    Simmons, A. J.
    Berrisford, P.
    Poli, P.
    Kobayashi, S.
    Andrae, U.
    Balmaseda, M. A.
    Balsamo, G.
    Bauer, P.
    Bechtold, P.
    Beljaars, A. C. M.
    van de Berg, L.
    Bidlot, J.
    Bormann, N.
    Delsol, C.
    Dragani, R.
    Fuentes, M.
    Geer, A. J.
    Haimberger, L.
    Healy, S. B.
    Hersbach, H.
    Holm, E. V.
    Isaksen, L.
    Kållberg, Per
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Koehler, M.
    Matricardi, M.
    McNally, A. P.
    Monge-Sanz, B. M.
    Morcrette, J. -J
    Park, B. -K
    Peubey, C.
    de Rosnay, P.
    Tavolato, C.
    Thepaut, J. -N
    Vitart, F.
    The ERA-Interim reanalysis: configuration and performance of the data assimilation system2011In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, ISSN 0035-9009, E-ISSN 1477-870X, Vol. 137, no 656, p. 553-597Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ERA-Interim is the latest global atmospheric reanalysis produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The ERA-Interim project was conducted in part to prepare for a new atmospheric reanalysis to replace ERA-40, which will extend back to the early part of the twentieth century. This article describes the forecast model, data assimilation method, and input datasets used to produce ERA-Interim, and discusses the performance of the system. Special emphasis is placed on various difficulties encountered in the production of ERA-40, including the representation of the hydrological cycle, the quality of the stratospheric circulation, and the consistency in time of the reanalysed fields. We provide evidence for substantial improvements in each of these aspects. We also identify areas where further work is needed and describe opportunities and objectives for future reanalysis projects at ECMWF. Copyright (C) 2011 Royal Meteorological Society

  • 302. Denby, B. R.
    et al.
    Sundvor, I.
    Johansson, C.
    Pirjola, L.
    Ketzel, M.
    Norman, M.
    Kupiainen, K.
    Gustafsson, M.
    Blomqvist, G.
    Kauhaniemi, M.
    Omstedt, Gunnar
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    A coupled road dust and surface moisture model to predict non-exhaust road traffic induced particle emissions (NORTRIP). Part 2: Surface moisture and salt impact modelling2013In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 81, p. 485-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-exhaust traffic induced emissions are a major source of airborne particulate matter in most European countries. This is particularly important in Nordic and Alpine countries where winter time road traction maintenance occurs, e.g. salting and sanding, and where studded tyres are used. Though the total mass generated by wear sources is a key factor in non-exhaust emissions, these emissions are also strongly controlled by surface moisture conditions. In this paper, Part 2, the road surface moisture submodel of a coupled road dust and surface moisture model (NORTRIP) is described. We present a description of the road surface moisture part of the model and apply the coupled model to seven sites in Stockholm, Oslo, Helsinki and Copenhagen over 18 separate periods, ranging from 3.5 to 24 months. At two sites surface moisture measurements are available and the moisture sub-model is compared directly to these observations. The model predicts the frequency of wet roads well at both sites, with an average fractional bias of -2.6%. The model is found to correctly predict the hourly surface state, wet or dry, 85% of the time. From the 18 periods modelled using the coupled model an average absolute fractional bias of 15% for PM10 concentrations was found. Similarly the model predicts the 90'th daily mean percentiles of PMio with an average absolute bias of 19% and an average correlation (R-2) of 0.49. When surface moisture is not included in the modelling then this average correlation is reduced to 0.16, demonstrating the importance of the surface moisture conditions. Tests have been carried out to assess the sensitivity of the model to model parameters and input data. The model provides a useful tool for air quality management and for improving our understanding of non-exhaust traffic emissions. (C) 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 303. Denby, B. R.
    et al.
    Sundvor, I.
    Johansson, C.
    Pirjola, L.
    Ketzel, M.
    Norman, M.
    Kupiainen, K.
    Gustafsson, M.
    Blomqvist, G.
    Omstedt, Gunnar
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    A coupled road dust and surface moisture model to predict non-exhaust road traffic induced particle emissions (NORTRIP). Part 1: Road dust loading and suspension modelling2013In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 77, p. 283-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-exhaust traffic induced emissions are a major source of particle mass in most European countries. This is particularly important in Nordic and Alpine countries where winter time road traction maintenance occurs, e.g. salting and sanding, and where studded tyres are used. In this paper, Part 1, the road dust sub-model of a coupled road dust and surface moisture model (NORTRIP) is described. The model provides a generalised process based formulation of the non-exhaust emissions, with emphasis on the contribution of road wear, suspension, surface dust loading and the effect of road surface moisture (retention of wear particles and suspended emissions). The model is intended for use as a tool for air quality managers to help study the impact of mitigation measures and policies. We present a description of the road dust sub-model and apply the model to two sites in Stockholm and Copenhagen where seven years of data with surface moisture measurements are available. For the site in Stockholm, where studded tyres are in use, the model predicts the PM10 concentrations very well with correlations (R-2) in the range of R-2 = 0.76-0.91 for daily mean PM10. The model also reproduces well the impact of a reduction in studded tyres at this site. For the site in Copenhagen the correlation is lower, in the range 0.44-0.51. The addition of salt is described in the model and at both sites this leads to improved correlations due to additional salt emissions. For future use of the model a number of model parameters, e.g. wear factors and suspension rates, still need to be refined. The effect of sanding on PM10 emissions is also presented but more information will be required before this can be confidently applied for management applications. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 304. Deng, Junjie
    et al.
    Harff, Jan
    Schimanke, Semjon
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    A method for assessing the coastline recession due to the sea level rise by assuming stationary wind-wave climate2015In: OCEANOLOGICAL AND HYDROBIOLOGICAL STUDIES, ISSN 1730-413X, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 362-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The method introduced in this study for future projection of coastline changes hits the vital need of communicating the potential climate change impact on the coast in the 21th century. A quantitative method called the Dynamic Equilibrium Shore Model (DESM) has been developed to hindcast historical sediment mass budgets and to reconstruct a paleo Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The forward mode of the DESM model relies on paleo-scenarios reconstructed by the DESM model assuming stationary wind-wave climate. A linear relationship between the sea level, coastline changes and sediment budget is formulated and proven by the least square regression method. In addition to its forward prediction of coastline changes, this linear relationship can also estimate the sediment budget by using the information on the coastline and relative sea level changes. Wind climate change is examined based on regional climate model data. Our projections for the end of the 21st century suggest that the wind and wave climates in the southern Baltic Sea may not change compared to present conditions and that the investigated coastline along the Pomeranian Bay may retreat from 10 to 100 m depending on the location and on the sea level rise which was assumed to be in the range of 0.12 to 0.24 m.

  • 305. Deque, M
    et al.
    Jones, R G
    Wild, M
    Giorgi, F
    Christensen, J H
    Hassell, D C
    Vidale, P L
    Rockel, B
    Jacob, D
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    de Castro, M
    Kucharski, F
    van den Hurk, B
    Global high resolution versus Limited Area Model climate change projections over Europe: quantifying confidence level from PRUDENCE results2005In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 653-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four high resolution atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) have been integrated with the standard forcings of the PRUDENCE experiment: IPCC-SRES A2 radiative forcing and Hadley Centre sea surface temperature and sea-ice extent. The response over Europe, calculated as the difference between the 2071-2100 and the 1961-1990 means is compared with the same diagnostic obtained with nine Regional Climate Models (RCM) all driven by the Hadley Centre atmospheric GCM. The seasonal mean response for 2m temperature and precipitation is investigated. For temperature, GCMs and RCMs behave similarly, except that GCMs exhibit a larger spread. However, during summer, the spread of the RCMs-in particular in terms of precipitation-is larger than that of the GCMs. This indicates that the European summer climate is strongly controlled by parameterized physics and/or high-resolution processes. The temperature response is larger than the systematic error. The situation is different for precipitation. The model bias is twice as large as the climate response. The confidence in PRUDENCE results comes from the fact that the models have a similar response to the IPCC-SRES A2 forcing, whereas their systematic errors are more spread. In addition, GCM precipitation response is slightly but significantly different from that of the RCMs.

  • 306. Deque, M.
    et al.
    Rowell, D. P.
    Luethi, D.
    Giorgi, F.
    Christensen, J. H.
    Rockel, B.
    Jacob, D.
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    de Castro, M.
    van den Hurk, B.
    An intercomparison of regional climate simulations for Europe: assessing uncertainties in model projections2007In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 81, p. 53-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten regional climate models (RCM) have been integrated with the standard forcings of the PRUDENCE experiment: IPCC-SRES A2 radiative forcing and Hadley Centre boundary conditions. The response over Europe, calculated as the difference between the 2071 2100and the 1961-1990 means can be viewed as an expected value about which various uncertainties exist. Uncertainties are measured here by variance in eight sub-European boxes. Four sources of uncertainty can be evaluated with the material provided by the PRUDENCE project. Sampling uncertainty is due to the fact that the model climate is estimated as an average over a finite number of years (30). Model uncertainty is due to the fact that the models use different techniques to discretize the equations and to represent sub-grid effects. Radiative uncertainty is due to the fact that IPCC-SRES A2 is merely one hypothesis. Some RCMs have been run with another scenario of greenhouse gas concentration (IPCC-SRES B2). Boundary uncertainty is due to the fact that the regional models have been run under the constraint of the same global model. Some RCMs have been run with other boundary forcings. The contribution of the different sources varies according to the field, the region and the season, but the role of boundary forcing is generally greater than the role of the RCM, in particular for temperature. Maps of minimum expected 2m temperature and precipitation responses for the IPCC-A2 scenario show that, despite the above mentioned uncertainties, the signal from the PRUDENCE ensemble is significant.

  • 307.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Fueglistaler, S.
    A climatological perspective of deep convection penetrating the TTL during the Indian summer monsoon from the AVHRR and MODIS instruments2010In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 4573-4582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of very deep convection on the water budget and thermal structure of the tropical tropopause layer is still not well quantified, not least because of limitations imposed by the available observation techniques. Here, we present detailed analysis of the climatology of the cloud top brightness temperatures as indicators of deep convection during the Indian summer monsoon, and the variations therein due to active and break periods. We make use of the recently newly processed data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) at a nominal spatial resolution of 4 km. Using temperature thresholds from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the AVHRR brightness temperatures are converted to climatological mean (2003-2008) maps of cloud amounts at 200, 150 and 100 hPa. Further, we relate the brightness temperatures to the level of zero radiative heating, which may allow a coarse identification of convective detrainment that will subsequently ascend into the stratosphere. The AVHRR data for the period 1982-2006 are used to document the differences in deep convection between active and break conditions of the monsoon. The analysis of AVHRR data is complemented with cloud top pressure and optical depth statistics (for the period 2003-2008) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard Aqua satellite. Generally, the two sensors provide a very similar description of deep convective clouds. Our analysis shows that most of the deep convection occurs over the Bay of Bengal and central northeast India. Very deep convection over the Tibetan plateau is comparatively weak, and may play only a secondary role in troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. The deep convection over the Indian monsoon region is most frequent in July/August, but the very highest convection (coldest tops, penetrating well into the TTL) occurs in May/June. Large variability in convection reaching the TTL is due to monsoon break/active periods. During the monsoon break period, deep convection reaching the TTL is almost entirely absent in the western part of the study area (i.e. 60 E-75 E), while the distribution over the Bay of Bengal and the Tibetan Plateau is less affected. Although the active conditions occur less frequently than the break conditions, they may have a larger bearing on the composition of the TTL within the monsoonal anticyclone, and tracer transport into the stratosphere because of deep convection occurring over anthropogenically more polluted regions.

  • 308.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Grassl, H.
    A daytime climatological distribution of high opaque ice cloud classes over the Indian summer monsoon region observed from 25-year AVHRR data2009In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 9, no 12, p. 4185-4196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A daytime climatological spatio-temporal distribution of high opaque ice cloud (HOIC) classes over the Indian subcontinent (0-40 degrees N, 60 degrees E-100 degrees E) is presented using 25-year data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRRs) for the summer monsoon months. The HOICs are important for regional radiative balance, precipitation and troposphere-stratosphere exchange. In this study, HOICs are sub-divided into three classes based on their cloud top brightness temperatures (BT). Class I represents very deep convection (BT < 220 K). Class II represents deep convection (220 K <=BT < 233 K) and Class III background convection (233 K <=BT < 253 K). Apart from presenting finest spatial resolution (0.1x0.1 degrees) and long-term climatology of such cloud classes from AVHRRs to date, this study for the first time illustrates on (1) how these three cloud classes are climatologically distributed during monsoon months, and (2) how their distribution changes during active and break monsoon conditions. It is also investigated that how many deep convective clouds reach the tropopause layer during individual monsoon months. It is seen that Class I and Class II clouds dominate the Indian subcontinent during monsoon. The movement of monsoon over continent is very well reflected in these cloud classes. During monsoon breaks strong suppression of convective activity is observed over the Arabian Sea and the western coast of India. On the other hand, the presence of such convective activity is crucial for active monsoon conditions and all-India rainfall. It is found that a significant fraction of HOICs (3-5%) reach the tropopause layer over the Bay of Bengal during June and over the north and northeast India during July and August. Many cases are observed when clouds penetrate the tropopause layer and reach the lower stratosphere. Such cases mostly occur during June compared to the other months.

  • 309.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Grassl, H.
    Comparison of low brightness temperatures derived from the AVHRR thermal channels with in situ measurements in Antarctica2009In: International Journal of Remote Sensing, ISSN 0143-1161, E-ISSN 1366-5901, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 525-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites' Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRRs) represent the longest record (more than 25 years) of continuously available satellite-based thermal measurements, and have well-chosen spatial and spectral resolutions. As a consequence, these data are used extensively to develop cloud climatologies. However, for such applications, accurate calibration and intercalibration of both solar and thermal channels of the AVHRRs is necessary so as to homogenize the data obtained from the different AVHRR sensors. AVHRR thermal channels 4 and 5 are routinely used in threshold-based hierarchical decision-tree cloud detection and classification algorithms, and therefore an evaluation of the stability of these channels at low temperatures is important. In this letter, the AVHRR channel 4 and 5 brightness temperatures (BTs) are compared at five stations in Antarctica. The data for the period of June, July and August (the coldest months of every year and with minimal atmospheric influence) from 1982 to 2006 were used for the evaluations. The calibration and intercalibration of the thermal channels are found to be very robust. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) range from 2.2 to 3.4K and the correlation coefficients from 0.84 to 0.95. No apparent artefacts or artificial jumps in the BTs are visible in the data series after changes of sensors. The BTs from the thermal channels of the AVHRRs can be used for preparing cloud climatologies, as their intercalibration is found to be consistent across different afternoon satellites.

  • 310.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Quaas, J.
    Grassl, H.
    Correcting orbital drift signal in the time series of AVHRR derived convective cloud fraction using rotated empirical orthogonal function2012In: ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES, ISSN 1867-1381, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 267-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments onboard the series of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites offer the longest available meteorological data records from space. These satellites have drifted in orbit resulting in shifts in the local time sampling during the life span of the sensors onboard. Depending upon the amplitude of the diurnal cycle of the geophysical parameters derived, orbital drift may cause spurious trends in their time series. We investigate tropical deep convective clouds, which show pronounced diurnal cycle amplitude, to estimate an upper bound of the impact of orbital drift on their time series. We carry out a rotated empirical orthogonal function analysis (REOF) and show that the REOFs are useful in delineating orbital drift signal and, more importantly, in subtracting this signal in the time series of convective cloud amount. These results will help facilitate the derivation of homogenized data series of cloud amount from NOAA satellite sensors and ultimately analyzing trends from them. However, we suggest detailed comparison of various methods and rigorous testing thereof applying final orbital drift corrections.

  • 311.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Norin, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    The large-scale spatio-temporal variability of precipitation over Sweden observed from the weather radar network2014In: ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES, ISSN 1867-1381, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 1605-1617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using measurements from the national network of 12 weather radar stations for the 11-year period 2000-2010, we investigate the large-scale spatio-temporal variability of precipitation over Sweden. These statistics provide useful information to evaluate regional climate models as well as for hydrology and energy applications. A strict quality control is applied to filter out noise and artifacts from the radar data. We focus on investigating four distinct aspects: the diurnal cycle of precipitation and its seasonality, the dominant timescale (diurnal versus seasonal) of variability, precipitation response to different wind directions, and the correlation of precipitation events with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the Arctic Oscillation (AO). When classified based on their intensity, moderate-to high-intensity events (precipitation >0.34 mm/3 h) peak distinctly during late afternoon over the majority of radar stations in summer and during late night or early morning in winter. Precipitation variability is highest over the southwestern parts of Sweden. It is shown that the high-intensity events (precipitation >1.7 mm/3 h) are positively correlated with NAO and AO (esp. over northern Sweden), while the low intensity events are negatively correlated (esp. over southeastern parts). It is further observed that southeasterly winds often lead to intense precipitation events over central and northern Sweden, while southwesterly winds contribute most to the total accumulated precipitation for all radar stations. Apart from its operational applications, the present study demonstrates the potential of the weather radar data set for studying climatic features of precipitation over Sweden.

  • 312.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Kahn, Brian H.
    Tjernstrom, Michael
    Fetzer, Eric J.
    Tian, Baijun
    Teixeira, Joao
    Pagano, Thomas S.
    A DECADE OF SPACEBORNE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ARCTIC ATMOSPHERE Novel. Insights from NASA's AIRS Instrument2016In: BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY, ISSN 0003-0007, Vol. 97, no 11, p. 2163-2176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 313.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Koenigk, Torben
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Fetzer, E. J.
    The thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere observed by AIRS: comparisons during the record minimum sea ice extents of 2007 and 20122013In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 13, no 15, p. 7441-7450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The record sea ice minimum (SIM) extents observed during the summers of 2007 and 2012 in the Arctic are stark evidence of accelerated sea ice loss during the last decade. Improving our understanding of the Arctic atmosphere and accurate quantification of its characteristics becomes ever more crucial, not least to improve predictions of such extreme events in the future. In this context, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides crucial insights due to its ability to provide 3-D information on atmospheric thermodynamics. Here, we facilitate comparisons in the evolution of the thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere during these two SIM events using a decade-long AIRS observational record (2003-2012). It is shown that the meteorological conditions during 2012 were not extreme, but three factors of preconditioning from winter through early summer played an important role in accelerating sea ice melt. First, the marginal sea ice zones along the central Eurasian and North Atlantic sectors remained warm throughout winter and early spring in 2012 preventing thicker ice build-up. Second, the circulation pattern favoured efficient sea ice transport out of the Arctic in the Atlantic sector during late spring and early summer in 2012 compared to 2007. Third, additional warming over the Canadian archipelago and southeast Beaufort Sea from May onward further contributed to accelerated sea ice melt. All these factors may have lead the already thin and declining sea ice cover to pass below the previous sea ice extent minimum of 2007. In sharp contrast to 2007, negative surface temperature anomalies and increased cloudiness were observed over the East Siberian and Chukchi seas in the summer of 2012. The results suggest that satellite-based monitoring of atmospheric preconditioning could be a critical source of information in predicting extreme sea ice melting events in the Arctic.

  • 314.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Tjernstrom, M.
    Characteristics of water-vapour inversions observed over the Arctic by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and radiosondes2011In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 11, no 18, p. 9813-9823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An accurate characterization of the vertical structure of the Arctic atmosphere is useful in climate change and attribution studies as well as for the climate modelling community to improve projections of future climate over this highly sensitive region. Here, we investigate one of the dominant features of the vertical structure of the Arctic atmosphere, i.e. water-vapour inversions, using eight years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder data (2002-2010) and radiosounding profiles released from the two Arctic locations (North Slope of Alaska at Barrow and during SHEBA). We quantify the characteristics of clear-sky water vapour inversions in terms of their frequency of occurrence, strength and height covering the entire Arctic for the first time. We found that the frequency of occurrence of water-vapour inversions is highest during winter and lowest during summer. The inversion strength is, however, higher during summer. The observed peaks in the median inversion-layer heights are higher during the winter half of the year, at around 850 hPa over most of the Arctic Ocean, Siberia and the Canadian Archipelago, while being around 925 hPa during most of the summer half of the year over the Arctic Ocean. The radiosounding profiles agree with the frequency, location and strength of water-vapour inversions in the Pacific sector of the Arctic. In addition, the radiosoundings indicate that multiple inversions are the norm with relatively few cases without inversions. The amount of precipitable water within the water-vapour inversion structures is estimated and we find a distinct, two-mode contribution to the total column precipitable water. These results suggest that water-vapour inversions are a significant source to the column thermodynamics, especially during the colder winter and spring seasons. We argue that these inversions are a robust metric to test the reproducibility of thermodynamics within climate models. An accurate statistical representation of water-vapour inversions in models would mean that the large-scale coupling of moisture transport, precipitation, temperature and water-vapour vertical structure and radiation are essentially captured well in such models.

  • 315.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    A global survey of aerosol-liquid water cloud overlap based on four years of CALIPSO-CALIOP data2011In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 1143-1154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulating the radiative impacts of aerosols located above liquid water clouds presents a significant challenge. In particular, absorbing aerosols, such as smoke, may have significant impact in such situations and even change the sign of net radiative forcing. It is not possible to reliably obtain information on such overlap events from existing passive satellite sensors. However, the CALIOP instrument onboard NASA's CALIPSO satellite allows us to examine these events with unprecedented accuracy. Using four years of collocated CALIPSO 5 km Aerosol and Cloud Layer Version 3 Products (June 2006 May 2010), we quantify, for the first time, the characteristics of overlapping aerosol and water cloud layers globally. We investigate seasonal variability in these characteristics over six latitude bands to understand the hemispheric differences when all aerosol types are included in the analysis (the AAO case). We also investigate frequency of smoke aerosol-cloud overlap (the SAO case). Globally, the frequency is highest during the JJA months in the AAO case, while for the SAO case, it is highest in the SON months. The seasonal mean overlap frequency can regionally exceed 20% in the AAO case and 10% in the SAO case. In about 5-10% cases the vertical distance between aerosol and cloud layers is less than 100 m, while about in 45-60% cases it less than a kilometer in the annual means for different latitudinal bands. In about 70-80% cases, aerosol layers are less than a kilometer thick, while in about 18-22% cases they are 1-2 km thick. The frequency of aerosol layers 2-3 km thick is about 4-5% in the tropical belts during overlap events. Over the regions where high aerosol loadings are present, the overlap frequency can be up to 50% higher when quality criteria on aerosol/cloud feature detection are relaxed. Over the polar regions, more than 50% of the overlapping aerosol layers have optical thickness less than 0.02, but the contribution from the relatively optically thicker aerosol layers increases towards the equatorial regions in both hemispheres. The results suggest that the frequency of occurrence of overlap events is far from being negligible globally.

  • 316.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    An investigation of statistical link between inversion strength and carbon monoxide over Scandinavia in winter using AIRS data2012In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 56, p. 109-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temperature inversions influence the local air quality at smaller scales and the pollution transport at larger spatio-temporal scales and are one of the most commonly observed meteorological phenomena over Scandinavia (54 degrees N-70 degrees N, 0-30 degrees E) during winter. Here, apart from presenting key statistics on temperature inversions, a large-scale co-variation of inversion strength and carbon monoxide (CO), an ideal pollution tracer, is further quantified at six vertical levels in the free troposphere during three distinct meteorological regimes that are identified based on inversion strength. Collocated temperature and CO profiles from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are used for this purpose. Higher values of CO (up to 15%) are observed over Scandinavia during weakly stable regimes at all vertical levels studied, whereas lower CO values (up to 10%) are observed when inversions become stronger and elevated. The observed systematic co-variation between CO and inversion strength in three meteorological regimes is most likely explained by the efficacy of long-range transport to influence tropospheric composition over Scandinavia. We argue that this large-scale co-variation of temperature inversions and CO would be a robust metric to test coupling of large-scale meteorology and chemistry in transport models. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 317.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Sensitivity of Cloud Liquid Water Content Estimates to the Temperature-Dependent Thermodynamic Phase: A Global Study Using CloudSat Data2012In: Journal of Climate, ISSN 0894-8755, E-ISSN 1520-0442, Vol. 25, no 20, p. 7297-7307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this study is to underline the sensitivity of cloud liquid water content (LWC) estimates purely to 1) the shape of computationally simplified temperature-dependent thermodynamic phase and 2) the range of subzero temperatures covered to partition total cloud condensate into liquid and ice fractions. Linear, quadratic, or sigmoid-shaped functions for subfreezing temperatures (down to -20 degrees or -40 degrees C) are often used in climate models and reanalysis datasets for partitioning total condensate. The global vertical profiles of clouds obtained from CloudSat for the 4-yr period June 2006-May 2010 are used for sensitivity analysis and the quantitative estimates of sensitivities based on these realistic cloud profiles are provided. It is found that three cloud regimes in particular-convective clouds in the tropics, low-level clouds in the northern high latitudes, and middle-level clouds over the midlatitudes and Southern Ocean-are most sensitive to assumptions on thermodynamic phase. In these clouds, the LWC estimates based purely on quadratic or sigmoid-shaped functions with a temperature range down to -20 degrees C can differ by up to 20%-40% over the tropics (in seasonal means). 10%-30% over the midlatitudes, and up to 50% over high latitudes compared to a linear assumption. When the temperature range is extended down to -40 degrees C. LWC estimates in the sigmoid case can be much higher than the above values over high-latitude regions compared to the commonly used case with quadratic dependency down to -20 C. This sensitivity study emphasizes the need to critically investigate radiative impacts of cloud thermodynamic phase assumptions in simplified climate models and reanalysis datasets.

  • 318.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Tjernstrom, M.
    Caian, Mihaela
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Kahn, B. H.
    Fetzer, E. J.
    Influence of the Arctic Oscillation on the vertical distribution of clouds as observed by the A-Train constellation of satellites2012In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 12, no 21, p. 10535-10544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), the dominant mode of natural variability over the northerly high latitudes, on the spatial (horizontal and vertical) distribution of clouds in the Arctic. To that end, we use a suite of sensors on-board NASA's A-Train satellites that provide accurate observations of the distribution of clouds along with information on atmospheric thermodynamics. Data from three independent sensors are used (AQUA-AIRS, CALIOP-CALIPSO and CPR-CloudSat) covering two time periods (winter half years, November through March, of 2002-2011 and 2006-2011, respectively) along with data from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. We show that the zonal vertical distribution of cloud fraction anomalies averaged over 67-82 degrees N to a first approximation follows a dipole structure (referred to as "Greenland cloud dipole anomaly", GCDA), such that during the positive phase of the AO, positive and negative cloud anomalies are observed eastwards and westward of Greenland respectively, while the opposite is true for the negative phase of AO. By investigating the concurrent meteorological conditions (temperature, humidity and winds), we show that differences in the meridional energy and moisture transport during the positive and negative phases of the AO and the associated thermodynamics are responsible for the conditions that are conducive for the formation of this dipole structure. All three satellite sensors broadly observe this large-scale GCDA despite differences in their sensitivities, spatio-temporal and vertical resolutions, and the available lengths of data records, indicating the robustness of the results. The present study also provides a compelling case to carry out process-based evaluation of global and regional climate models.

  • 319.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Tjernstrom, Michael
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Omar, Ali H.
    The vertical distribution of thin features over the Arctic analysed from CALIPSO observations2011In: Tellus. Series B, Chemical and physical meteorology, ISSN 0280-6509, E-ISSN 1600-0889, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 77-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clouds play a crucial role in the Arctic climate system. Therefore, it is essential to accurately and reliably quantify and understand cloud properties over the Arctic. It is also important to monitor and attribute changes in Arctic clouds. Here, we exploit the capability of the CALIPSO-CALIOP instrument and provide comprehensive statistics of tropospheric thin clouds, otherwise extremely difficult to monitor from passive satellite sensors. We use 4 yr of data (June 2006-May 2010) over the circumpolar Arctic, here defined as 67-82 degrees N, and characterize probability density functions of cloud base and top heights, geometrical thickness and zonal distribution of such cloud layers, separately for water and ice phases, and discuss seasonal variability of these properties. When computed for the entire study area, probability density functions of cloud base and top heights and geometrical thickness peak at 200-400, 1000-2000 and 400-800 m, respectively, for thin water clouds, while for ice clouds they peak at 6-8, 7-9 and 400-1000 m, respectively. In general, liquid clouds were often identified below 2 km during all seasons, whereas ice clouds were sensed throughout the majority of the upper troposphere and also, but to a smaller extent, below 2 km for all seasons.

  • 320.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Tjernstrom, Michael
    Omar, Ali H.
    The vertical distribution of thin features over the Arctic analysed from CALIPSO observations2011In: Tellus. Series B, Chemical and physical meteorology, ISSN 0280-6509, E-ISSN 1600-0889, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 86-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Influx of aerosols from the mid-latitudes has a wide range of impacts on the Arctic atmosphere. In this study, the capability of the CALIPSO-CALIOP instrument to provide accurate observations of aerosol layers is exploited to characterize their vertical distribution, probability density functions (PDFs) of aerosol layer thickness, base and top heights, and optical depths over the Arctic for the 4-yr period from June 2006 to May 2010. It is shown that the bulk of aerosols, from about 65% in winter to 45% in summer, are confined below the lowermost kilometer of the troposphere. In the middle troposphere (3-5 km), spring and autumn seasons show slightly higher aerosol amounts compared to other two seasons. The relative vertical distribution of aerosols shows that clean continental aerosol is the largest contributor in all seasons except in summer, when layers of polluted continental aerosols are almost as large. In winter and spring, polluted continental aerosols are the second largest contributor to the total number of observed aerosol layers, whereas clean marine aerosol is the second largest contributor in summer and autumn. The PDFs of the geometrical thickness of the observed aerosol layers peak about 400-700 m. Polluted continental and smoke aerosols, which are associated with the intrusions from mid-latitudes, have much broader distributions of optical and geometrical thicknesses, suggesting that they appear more often optically thicker and higher up in the troposphere.

  • 321.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Quantifying the clear-sky temperature inversion frequency and strength over the Arctic Ocean during summer and winter seasons from AIRS profiles2010In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 5565-5572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temperature inversions are one of the dominant features of the Arctic atmosphere and play a crucial role in various processes by controlling the transfer of mass and moisture fluxes through the lower troposphere. It is therefore essential that they are accurately quantified, monitored and simulated as realistically as possible over the Arctic regions. In the present study, the characteristics of inversions in terms of frequency and strength are quantified for the entire Arctic Ocean for summer and winter seasons of 2003 to 2008 using the AIRS data for the clear-sky conditions. The probability density functions (PDFs) of the inversion strength are also presented for every summer and winter month. Our analysis shows that although the inversion frequency along the coastal regions of Arctic decreases from June to August, inversions are still seen in almost each profile retrieved over the inner Arctic region. In winter, inversions are ubiquitous and are also present in every profile analysed over the inner Arctic region. When averaged over the entire study area (70 degrees N-90 degrees N), the inversion frequency in summer ranges from 69 to 86% for the ascending passes and 72-86% for the descending passes. For winter, the frequency values are 88-91% for the ascending passes and 89-92% for the descending passes of AIRS/AQUA. The PDFs of inversion strength for the summer months are narrow and right-skewed (or positively skewed), while in winter, they are much broader. In summer months, the mean values of inversion strength for the entire study area range from 2.5 to 3.9 K, while in winter, they range from 7.8 to 8.9 K. The standard deviation of the inversion strength is double in winter compared to summer. The inversions in the summer months of 2007 were very strong compared to other years. The warming in the troposphere of about 1.5-3.0K vertically extending up to 400 hPa was observed in the summer months of 2007.

  • 322. Dias, Daniela
    et al.
    Amorim, Jorge Humberto
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Sa, Elisa
    Borrego, Carlos
    Fontes, Tania
    Fernandes, Paulo
    Pereira, Sergio Ramos
    Bandeira, Jorge
    Coelho, Margarida C.
    Tchepel, Oxana
    Assessing the importance of transportation activity data for urban emission inventories2018In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 62, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 323.
    Dieterich, Christian
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Schimanke, Semjon
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Wang, Shiyu
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Väli, Germo
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Liu, Ye
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Hordoir, Robinson
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Höglund, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Evaluation of the SMHI coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean model RCA4-NEMO2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractThe regional, coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean model RCA4-NEMO developed at the SMHI is evaluated on the basis of an ERA40 hindcast. While the development of the regional climate model is continuing a first assessment is presented here to allow for an orientation about the status guo. RCA4-NEMO in its present form consists of two model components. The regional atmosphere model RCA4 covers the whole of Europe and is interactvely coupled to a North Sea and Baltic Sea ice-ocean model based on NEMO. RCA4-NEMO is currently being used to downscale CMIP5 scenarios for the North Sea and Baltic Sea region for this century. As a part of the validation of RCA4-NEMO we present an analysis and discussion of the hindcast period 1970-1999. The model realization is compared to observational records. Near surface temperatures and heat fluxes compare reasonably well with records of in-situ measurments and satellite derived estimates. For salinities and freshwater fluxes the agreement with observations in not satisfactory yet. The momentum fluxes transferred from the atmosphere to the ice-ocean model are identified as on of the sensitive processes in the coupling of both model components. Except for the freshwater exchange between atmosphere and ocean the climatological near surface properties and corresponding fluxes compare well with climatological estimates for the period 1970-1999.

  • 324.
    Dieterich, Christian
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Wang, Shiyu
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Schimanke, Semjon
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Groger, Matthias
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Klein, Birgit
    Hordoir, Robinson
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Liu, Ye
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Axell, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Höglund, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Surface Heat Budget over the North Sea in Climate Change Simulations2019In: Atmosphere, ISSN 2073-4433, E-ISSN 2073-4433, Vol. 10, no 5, article id 272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 325. Dietze, H.
    et al.
    Löptien, Ulrike
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Revisiting "nutrient trapping" in global coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation models2013In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 265-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze an extensive set of global coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation models. The focus is on the equatorial Pacific. In all simulations, which are consistent with observed standing stocks of relevant biogeochemical species at the surface, we find spuriously enhanced (reduced) macronutrient (oxygen) concentrations in the deep eastern equatorial Pacific. This modeling problem, apparently endemic to global coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation models, was coined " nutrient trapping" by Najjar et al. (1992). In contrast to Aumont et al. (1999), we argue that " nutrient trapping" is still a persistent problem, even in eddy-permitting models and, further, that the scale of the problem retards model projections of nitrogen cycling. In line with previous work, our results indicate that a deficient circulation is at the core of the problem rather than an admittedly poor quantitative understanding of biogeochemical cycles. More specifically, we present indications that " nutrient trapping" in models is a result of a spuriously damped Equatorial Intermediate (zonal) Current System and Equatorial Deep Jets-phenomenon which await a comprehensive understanding and have, to date, not been successfully simulated.

  • 326.
    Doescher, Ralf
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Beckmann, A
    Effects of a bottom boundary layer parameterization in a coarse-resolution model of the North Atlantic Ocean2000In: Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, ISSN 0739-0572, E-ISSN 1520-0426, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 698-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bottom boundary layer model approach of Beckmann and Doscher has been adopted for application in a coarse-resolution model of the North Atlantic Ocean. Both components of the approach (advective and conditional diffusive) are found to affect the deep water stratification and circulation. A significant deepening of the downward spreading North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) is the major effect. This is associated with an enhanced spatial coverage of the NADW cell in the meridional circulation.

  • 327.
    Doescher, Ralf
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The development of the coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO2001In: Third study conference on BALTEX / [ed] J. Meywerk, 2001, p. 45-46Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 328.
    Doescher, Ralf
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Koenigk, Torben
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Arctic rapid sea ice loss events in regional coupled climate scenario experiments2013In: Ocean Science, ISSN 1812-0784, E-ISSN 1812-0792, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 217-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid sea ice loss events (RILEs) in a mini-ensemble of regional Arctic coupled climate model scenario experiments are analyzed. Mechanisms of sudden ice loss are strongly related to atmospheric circulation conditions and preconditioning by sea ice thinning during the seasons and years before the event. Clustering of events in time suggests a strong control by large-scale atmospheric circulation. Anomalous atmospheric circulation is providing warm air anomalies of up to 5 K and is forcing ice flow, affecting winter ice growth. Even without a seasonal preconditioning during winter, ice drop events can be initiated by anomalous inflow of warm air during summer. It is shown that RILEs can be generated based on atmospheric circulation changes as a major driving force without major competing mechanisms, other than occasional longwave effects during spring and summer. Other anomalous seasonal radiative forcing or short-lived forcers (e.g., soot) play minor roles or no role at all in our model. RILEs initiated by ocean forcing do not occur in the model, although cannot be ruled out due to model limitations. Mechanisms found are qualitatively in line with observations of the 2007 RILE.

  • 329.
    Doescher, Ralf
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Simulated sea surface temperature and heat fluxes in different climates of the Baltic Sea2004In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 33, no 4-5, p. 242-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical state of the Baltic Sea in possible future climates is approached by numerical model experiments with a regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model driven by different global simulations. Scenarios and recent climate simulations are compared to estimate changes. The sea surface is clearly warmer by 2.9degreesC in the ensemble mean. The horizontal pattern of average annual mean warming can largely be explained in terms of ice-cover reduction. The transfer of heat from the atmosphere to the Baltic Sea shows a changed seasonal cycle: a reduced heat loss in fall, increased heat uptake in spring, and reduced heat uptake in summer. The interannual variability of surface temperature is generally increased. This is associated with a smoothed frequency distribution in northern basins. The overall heat budget shows increased solar radiation to the sea surface, which is balanced by changes of the other heat flux components.

  • 330.
    Doescher, Ralf
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Simulated Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice in Different Climates of the Baltic2004In: Fourth Study Conference on BALTEX: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Hans-Jörg Isemer, Risø National Laboratory Technical University of Denmark GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH , 2004, Vol. 4, p. 162-163Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 331.
    Doescher, Ralf
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Vihma, T.
    Maksimovich, E.
    Recent advances in understanding the Arctic climate system state and change from a sea ice perspective: a review2014In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 14, no 24, p. 13571-13600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sea ice is the central component and most sensitive indicator of the Arctic climate system. Both the depletion and areal decline of the Arctic sea ice cover, observed since the 1970s, have accelerated since the millennium. While the relationship of global warming to sea ice reduction is evident and underpinned statistically, it is the connecting mechanisms that are explored in detail in this review. Sea ice erodes both from the top and the bottom. Atmospheric, oceanic and sea ice processes interact in non-linear ways on various scales. Feedback mechanisms lead to an Arctic amplification of the global warming system: the amplification is both supported by the ice depletion and, at the same time, accelerates ice reduction. Knowledge of the mechanisms of sea ice decline grew during the 1990s and deepened when the acceleration became clear in the early 2000s. Record minimum summer sea ice extents in 2002, 2005, 2007 and 2012 provide additional information on the mechanisms. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the sea ice decline. Processes are revisited from atmospheric, oceanic and sea ice perspectives. There is strong evidence that decisive atmospheric changes are the major driver of sea ice change. Feedbacks due to reduced ice concentration, surface albedo, and ice thickness allow for additional local atmospheric and oceanic influences and self-supporting feedbacks. Large-scale ocean influences on Arctic Ocean hydrology and circulation are highly evident. Northward heat fluxes in the ocean are clearly impacting the ice margins, especially in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic. There is little indication of a direct and decisive influence of the warming ocean on the overall sea ice cover, due to an isolating layer of cold and fresh water underneath the sea ice.

  • 332.
    Doescher, Ralf
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willen, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Graham, Phil
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The development of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model RCAO2002In: Boreal environment research, ISSN 1239-6095, E-ISSN 1797-2469, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A regional coupled ocean-atmosphere-ice general circulation model for northern Europe is introduced for climate study purposes. The Baltic Sea is interactively coupled. The coupled model is validated in a 5-year hind-cast experiment with a focus on surface quantities and atmosphere-ocean heat fluxes. The coupled sea surface temperature matches observations well. The system is free of drift, does not need flux corrections and is suitable for multi-year climate runs. With flux forcing from the atmospheric model the regional ocean model gives sea surface temperatures statistically equivalent to the uncoupled ocean model forced by observations. Other oceanic surface quantities do not reach this quality in combination with the current atmosphere model. A strong dependence of sea ice extent on details of the atmospheric radiation scheme is found. Our standard scheme leads to an overestimation of ice, most likely due to a negative bias of long-wave radiation. There is indication that a latent heat flux bias in fall contributes to the ice problem. Other atmosphere-ocean heat fluxes are generally realistic in the long term mean.

  • 333.
    Doescher, Ralf
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Qian, Minwei
    Redler, Ren
    Quantifying Arctic contributions to climate predictability in a regional coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere model2010In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 34, no 7-8, p. 1157-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relative importance of regional processes inside the Arctic climate system and the large scale atmospheric circulation for Arctic interannual climate variability has been estimated with the help of a regional Arctic coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere model. The study focuses on sea ice and surface climate during the 1980s and 1990s. Simulations agree reasonably well with observations. Correlations between the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index and the summer Arctic sea ice thickness and summer sea ice extent are found. Spread of sea ice extent within an ensemble of model runs can be associated with a surface pressure gradient between the Nordic Seas and the Kara Sea. Trends in the sea ice thickness field are widely significant and can formally be attributed to large scale forcing outside the Arctic model domain. Concerning predictability, results indicate that the variability generated by the external forcing is more important in most regions than the internally generated variability. However, both are in the same order of magnitude. Local areas such as the Northern Greenland coast together with Fram Straits and parts of the Greenland Sea show a strong importance of internally generated variability, which is associated with wind direction variability due to interaction with atmospheric dynamics on the Greenland ice sheet. High predictability of sea ice extent is supported by north-easterly winds from the Arctic Ocean to Scandinavia.

  • 334. Dokter, Adriaan M.
    et al.
    Desmet, Peter
    Spaaks, Jurriaan H.
    van Hoey, Stijn
    Veen, Lourens
    Verlinden,, Liesbeth
    Nilsson, Cecilia
    Haase, Günther
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Leijnse, Hidde
    Farnsworth,, Andrew
    Bouten, Willem
    Shamoun-Baranes, Judy
    bioRad: biological analysis and visualization of weather radar data2018In: Ecography, ISSN 0906-7590, E-ISSN 1600-0587, no 42, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 335. Dokter, Adriaan M.
    et al.
    Desmet, Peter
    Spaaks, Jurriaan H.
    van Hoey, Stijn
    Veen, Lourens
    Verlinden, Liesbeth
    Nilsson, Cecilia
    Haase, Günther
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Leijnse, Hidde
    Farnsworth, Andrew
    Bouten, Willem
    Shamoun-Baranes, Judy
    bioRad: biological analysis and visualization of weather radar data2019In: Ecography, ISSN 0906-7590, E-ISSN 1600-0587, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 852-860Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 336.
    Donnelly, Chantal
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Andersson, Jafet
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Arheimer, Berit
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Using flow signatures and catchment similarities to evaluate the E-HYPE multi-basin model across Europe2016In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 255-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open data make it possible to set up multi-basin models for large domains across environmental, climate and administrative boundaries. This study presents new methods for evaluating a number of aspects of multi-basin model performance, while exploring the performance of the E-HYPE_v2.1 model for several evaluation criteria in 181 independent river gauges across the European continent. Embedded model assumptions on dominant flow generating mechanisms are analysed by correlating physiographical characteristics to the flow regime. The results indicate that the model captures the spatial variability of flow and is therefore suitable for predictions in ungauged basins. The model shows good performance of long-term means and seasonality, while short-term daily variability is less well represented, especially for Mediterranean and mountainous areas. Major identified shortcomings refer to the resolution of precipitation patterns, aquifer exchanges, water extractions and regulation. This will guide the work with the next model version for which improvements in input data, processes and calibration have been identified to potentially contribute most to improved model performance. [GRAPHICS]

  • 337.
    Donnelly, Chantal
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Greuell, Wouter
    Andersson, Jafet
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Gerten, Dieter
    Pisacane, Giovanna
    Roudier, Philippe
    Ludwig, Fulco
    Impacts of climate change on European hydrology at 1.5, 2 and 3 degrees mean global warming above preindustrial level2017In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 143, no 1-2, p. 13-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 338.
    Donnelly, Chantal
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Greuell, Wouter
    Andersson, Jafet
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Gerten, Dieter
    Pisacane, Giovanna
    Roudier, Philippe
    Ludwig, Fulco
    Impacts of climate change on European hydrology at 1.5, 2 and 3 degrees mean global warming above preindustrial level (vol 143, pg 13, 2017)2017In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 143, no 3-4, p. 535-535Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Donnelly, Chantal
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Larson, M.
    Hanson, H.
    A numerical model of coastal overwash2009In: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Maritime Engineering, ISSN 1741-7597, E-ISSN 1751-7737, Vol. 162, no 3, p. 105-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overwash, the flow of water and sediment over the crest of a beach, contributes to flooding and the deposition of sand landward of the beach crest. Washover, the sand deposited by overwash, contributes to the sediment budget and migration of barrier islands. The ability to predict the occurrence, location, and thickness of overwash deposits is important for coastal residents, coastal town planners, environmental planners, and engineers alike. In this study, a numerical model that simulates the sediment transport and one-dimensional barrier profile change caused by overwash was developed. The magnitude of overwash and the morphology of washovers are dependent on the overwash regime. New formulae are developed to estimate the sediment transport rate over the beach crest for both run-up overwash, using ballistics theory, and inundation overwash, treating flow over the crest as weir flow. Two-dimensional flow is described on the back barrier by considering the continuity of a block of water at steady state, taking into account lateral spreading, friction, and infiltration. The model is tested against 26 different beach profile sets from several different locations, and several different storms, exhibiting a variety of initial morphologies. The model is capable of reproducing varying overwash morphology responses including dune crest erosion, dune destruction, barrier rollback, the thinning of a washover deposit on the backbarrier, and overwash over a multiple dune system.

  • 340.
    Donnelly, Chantal
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Rosberg, Jörgen
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Isberg, Kristina
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    A validation of river routing networks for catchment modelling from small to large scales2013In: HYDROLOGY RESEARCH, ISSN 1998-9563, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 917-925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Underpinning all hydrological simulations is an estimate of the catchment area upstream of a point of interest. Locally, the delineation of a catchment and estimation of its area is usually done using fine scale maps and local knowledge, but for large-scale hydrological modelling, particularly continental and global scale modelling, this level of detailed data analysis is not practical. For large-scale hydrological modelling, remotely sensed and hydrologically conditioned river routing networks, such as HYDROlk and HydroSHEDS, are often used. This study evaluates the accuracy of the accumulated upstream area in each gridpoint given by the networks. This is useful for evaluating the ability of these data sets to delineate catchments of varying scale for use in hydrological models. It is shown that the higher resolution HydroSHEDS data set gives better results than the HYDROlk data set and that accuracy decreases with decreasing basin scale. In ungauged basins, or where other local catchment area data are not available, the validation made in this study can be used to indicate the likelihood of correctly delineating catchments of different scales using these river routing networks.

  • 341.
    Donnelly, Chantal
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Yang, Wei
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Dahne, Joel
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    River discharge to the Baltic Sea in a future climate2014In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 122, no 1-2, p. 157-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports on new projections of discharge to the Baltic Sea given possible realisations of future climate and uncertainties regarding these projections. A high-resolution, pan-Baltic application of the Hydrological Predictions for the Environment (HYPE) model was used to make transient simulations of discharge to the Baltic Sea for a mini-ensemble of climate projections representing two high emissions scenarios. The biases in precipitation and temperature adherent to climate models were adjusted using a Distribution Based Scaling (DBS) approach. As well as the climate projection uncertainty, this study considers uncertainties in the bias-correction and hydrological modelling. While the results indicate that the cumulative discharge to the Baltic Sea for 2071 to 2100, as compared to 1971 to 2000, is likely to increase, the uncertainties quantified from the hydrological model and the bias-correction method show that even with a state-of-the-art methodology, the combined uncertainties from the climate model, bias-correction and impact model make it difficult to draw conclusions about the magnitude of change. It is therefore urged that as well as climate model and scenario uncertainty, the uncertainties in the bias-correction methodology and the impact model are also taken into account when conducting climate change impact studies.

  • 342. Doos, K
    et al.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Doescher, Ralf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The Baltic haline conveyor belt or the overturning circulation and mixing in the Baltic2004In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 33, no 4-5, p. 261-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of the water-mass circulation of the Baltic has been undertaken by making use of a three dimensional Baltic Sea model simulation. The saline water from the North Atlantic is traced through the Danish Sounds into the Baltic where it upwells and mixes with the fresh water inflow from the rivers forming a Baltic haline conveyor belt. The mixing of the saline water from the Great Belt and Oresund with the fresh water is investigated making use of overturning stream functions and Lagrangian trajectories. The overturning stream function was calculated as a function of four different vertical coordinates (depth, salinity, temperature and density) in order to understand the path of the water and where it upwells and mixes. Evidence of a fictive depth overturning cell similar to the Deacon Cell in the Southern Ocean was found in the Baltic proper corresponding to the gyre circulation around Gotland, which vanishes when the overturning stream function is projected on density layers. A Lagrangian trajectory study was performed to obtain a better view of the circulation and mixing of the saline and fresh waters. The residence time of the water masses in the Baltic is calculated to be 26-29 years and the Lagrangian dispersion reaches basin saturation after 5 years.

  • 343. Dosio, Alessandro
    et al.
    Mentaschi, Lorenzo
    Fischer, Erich M.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Extreme heat waves under 1.5 degrees C and 2 degrees C global warming2018In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 13, no 5, article id 054006Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 344. Dufton, David
    et al.
    Haase, Günther
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Johnson, Daniel
    Vulpiani, Gianfranco
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    MONITORING THE ONGOING UPGRADE OF THE SWEDISH WEATHER RADAR NETWORK2018In: 10th European Conference on Radar in Meteorology and Hydrology (ERAD 2018) : 1-6 July 2018, Ede-Wageningen, The Netherlands / [ed] Vos, Lotte de; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko, 2018, p. 249-250, article id 6.16Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 345.
    Dybbroe, Adam
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Thoss, Anke
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    NWCSAF AVHRR cloud detection and analysis using dynamic thresholds and radiative transfer modeling. Part I: Algorithm description2005In: Journal of applied meteorology (1988), ISSN 0894-8763, E-ISSN 1520-0450, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 39-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New methods and software for cloud detection and classification at high and midlatitudes using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data are developed for use in a wide range of meteorological, climatological, land surface, and oceanic applications within the Satellite Application Facilities (SAFs) of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), including the SAF for Nowcasting and Very Short Range Forecasting Applications (NWCSAF) project. The cloud mask employs smoothly varying (dynamic) thresholds that separate fully cloudy or cloud-contaminated fields of view from cloud-free conditions. Thresholds are adapted to the actual state of the atmosphere and surface and the sun-satellite viewing geometry using cloud-free radiative transfer model simulations. Both the cloud masking and the cloud-type classification are done using sequences of grouped threshold tests that employ both spectral and textural features. The cloud-type classification divides the cloudy pixels into 10 different categories: 5 opaque cloud types, 4 semitransparent clouds, and 1 subpixel cloud category. The threshold method is fuzzy in the sense that the distances in feature space to the thresholds are stored and are used to determine whether to stop or to continue testing. They are also used as a quality indicator of the final output. The atmospheric state should preferably be taken from a short-range NWP model, but the algorithms can also run with climatological fields as input.

  • 346.
    Dybbroe, Adam
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Thoss, Anke
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    NWCSAF AVHRR cloud detection and analysis using dynamic thresholds and radiative transfer modeling. Part II: Tuning and validation2005In: Journal of applied meteorology (1988), ISSN 0894-8763, E-ISSN 1520-0450, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 55-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Algorithms for cloud detection (cloud mask) and classification (cloud type) at high and midlatitudes using data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board the current NOAA satellites and future polar Meteorological and Operational Weather Satellites (METOP) of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites have been extensively validated over northern Europe and the adjacent seas. The algorithms have been described in detail in Part I and are based on a multispectral grouped threshold approach, making use of cloud-free radiative transfer model simulations. The thresholds applied in the algorithms have been validated and tuned using a database interactively built up over more than 1 yr of data from NOAA-12, -14, and -15 by experienced nephanalysts. The database contains almost 4000 rectangular (in the image data)-sized targets (typically with sides around 10 pixels), with satellite data collocated in time and space with atmospheric data from a short-range NWP forecast model, land cover characterization, elevation data, and a label identifying the given cloud or surface type as interpreted by the nephanalyst. For independent and objective validation, a large dataset of nearly 3 yr of collocated surface synoptic observation (Synop) reports, AVHRR data, and NWP model output over northern and central Europe have been collected. Furthermore, weather radar data were used to check the consistency of the cloud type. The cloud mask performs best over daytime sea and worst at twilight and night over land. As compared with Synop, the cloud cover is overestimated during night (except for completely overcast situations) and is underestimated at twilight. The algorithms have been compared with the more empirically based Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) Cloud Analysis Model Using Digital AVHRR Data (SCANDIA), operationally run at SMHI since 1989, and results show that performance has improved significantly.

  • 347. Eckhardt, S.
    et al.
    Quennehen, B.
    Olivie, D. J. L.
    Berntsen, T. K.
    Cherian, R.
    Christensen, J. H.
    Collins, W.
    Crepinsek, S.
    Daskalakis, N.
    Flanner, M.
    Herber, A.
    Heyes, C.
    Hodnebrog, O.
    Huang, L.
    Kanakidou, M.
    Klimont, Z.
    Langner, Joakim
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Law, K. S.
    Lund, M. T.
    Mahmood, R.
    Massling, A.
    Myriokefalitakis, S.
    Nielsen, I. E.
    Nojgaard, J. K.
    Quaas, J.
    Quinn, P. K.
    Raut, J. -C
    Rumbold, S. T.
    Schulz, M.
    Sharma, S.
    Skeie, R. B.
    Skov, H.
    Uttal, T.
    von Salzen, K.
    Stohl, A.
    Current model capabilities for simulating black carbon and sulfate concentrations in the Arctic atmosphere: a multi-model evaluation using a comprehensive measurement data set2015In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 15, no 16, p. 9413-9433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concentrations of sulfate, black carbon (BC) and other aerosols in the Arctic are characterized by high values in late winter and spring (so-called Arctic Haze) and low values in summer. Models have long been struggling to capture this seasonality and especially the high concentrations associated with Arctic Haze. In this study, we evaluate sulfate and BC concentrations from eleven different models driven with the same emission inventory against a comprehensive pan-Arctic measurement data set over a time period of 2 years (2008-2009). The set of models consisted of one Lagrangian particle dispersion model, four chemistry transport models (CTMs), one atmospheric chemistry-weather forecast model and five chemistry climate models (CCMs), of which two were nudged to meteorological analyses and three were running freely. The measurement data set consisted of surface measurements of equivalent BC (eBC) from five stations (Alert, Barrow, Pallas, Tiksi and Zeppelin), elemental carbon (EC) from Station Nord and Alert and aircraft measurements of refractory BC (rBC) from six different campaigns. We find that the models generally captured the measured eBC or rBC and sulfate concentrations quite well, compared to previous comparisons. However, the aerosol seasonality at the surface is still too weak in most models. Concentrations of eBC and sulfate averaged over three surface sites are underestimated in winter/spring in all but one model (model means for January-March underestimated by 59 and 37% for BC and sulfate, respectively), whereas concentrations in summer are overestimated in the model mean (by 88 and 44% for July-September), but with overestimates as well as underestimates present in individual models. The most pronounced eBC underestimates, not included in the above multi-site average, are found for the station Tiksi in Siberia where the measured annual mean eBC concentration is 3 times higher than the average annual mean for all other stations. This suggests an underestimate of BC sources in Russia in the emission inventory used. Based on the campaign data, biomass burning was identified as another cause of the modeling problems. For sulfate, very large differences were found in the model ensemble, with an apparent anti-correlation between modeled surface concentrations and total atmospheric columns. There is a strong correlation between observed sulfate and eBC concentrations with consistent sulfate/eBC slopes found for all Arctic stations, indicating that the sources contributing to sulfate and BC are similar throughout the Arctic and that the aerosols are internally mixed and undergo similar removal. However, only three models reproduced this finding, whereas sulfate and BC are weakly correlated in the other models. Overall, no class of models (e.g., CTMs, CCMs) performed better than the others and differences are independent of model resolution.

  • 348.
    Edman, Moa
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Eilola, Kari
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Wåhlstrom, Irene
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Arneborg, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Nutrient Retention in the Swedish Coastal Zone2018In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 5, article id UNSP 415Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 349. Eero, Margit
    et al.
    Andersson, Helén
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    MacKenzie, Brian R.
    Has eutrophication promoted forage fish production in the Baltic Sea?2016In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 649-660Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 350. Eggert, B.
    et al.
    Berg, Peter
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Haerter, J. O.
    Jacob, D.
    Moseley, C.
    Temporal and spatial scaling impacts on extreme precipitation2015In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 5957-5971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Convective and stratiform precipitation events have fundamentally different physical causes. Using a radar composite over Germany, this study separates these precipitation types and compares extremes at different spatial and temporal scales, ranging from 1 to 50 km and 5 min to 6 h, respectively. Four main objectives are addressed. First, we investigate extreme precipitation intensities for convective and stratiform precipitation events at different spatial and temporal resolutions to identify type-dependent space and time reduction factors and to analyze regional and seasonal differences over Germany. We find strong differences between the types, with up to 30% higher reduction factors for convective compared to stratiform extremes, exceeding all other observed seasonal and regional differences within one type. Second, we investigate how the differences in reduction factors affect the contribution of each type to extreme events as a whole, again dependent on the scale and the threshold chosen. A clear shift occurs towards more convective extremes at higher resolution or higher percentiles. For horizontal resolutions of current climate model simulations, i.e., similar to 10 km, the temporal resolution of the data as well as the chosen threshold have profound influence on which type of extreme will be statistically dominant. Third, we compare the ratio of area to duration reduction factor for convective and stratiform events and find that convective events have lower effective advection velocities than stratiform events and are therefore more strongly affected by spatial than by temporal aggregation. Finally, we discuss the entire precipitation distribution regarding data aggregation and identify matching pairs of temporal and spatial resolutions where similar distributions are observed. The information is useful for planning observational networks or storing model data at different temporal and spatial scales.

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