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  • 151.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Clear-sky thermodynamic and radiative anomalies over a sea ice sensitive region of the Arctic2012In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-897X, E-ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 117, article id D19111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monthly clear-sky anomalies of atmospheric temperature and water vapor over the East Siberian and Laptev Sea regions of the Arctic for 2003-2010 are examined here. This region experiences significant interannual variations in sea ice concentration and is also where ice loss was most apparent in the record year 2007. Clear-sky thermodynamic profiles come from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) sensor onboard the Aqua satellite. Associated longwave (LW) and shortwave (SW) radiation-flux anomalies are estimated through radiative transfer modeling. Anomalies of temperature (+/- 10 K) and water vapor (+/- 1 g kg(-1)) often positively covary, resulting in distinct signatures in the clear-sky downwelling LW (LWD) anomalies, occasionally larger than +/- 10 W m(-2) around the 2003-2010 climatology. Estimates of mean greenhouse anomalies indicate a shift from negative to positive anomalies midway through the 8-year record. Sensitivity tests suggest that temperature anomalies are the strongest contributor to both LWD and greenhouse anomalies, relative to water-vapor anomalies; monthly averaging of column precipitable water yields relatively small anomalies (order 1 mm) that produce a linear response in greenhouse anomalies. Finally the clear-sky contribution to 2007 monthly ice thickness is estimated. Anomalous clear-sky radiation retards the total 2007 ice thickness by 0.3 m (15-30% of ice-thickness climatology), and anomalous LW radiation is most important for preconditioning the ice during the months prior to, and after, the summer melt season. A highly sensitive interaction between cloud fraction, surface albedo and LWD anomalies is found, and we develop a metric for determining clear-sky anomalous ice melt potential.

  • 152.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Shupe, Matthew D.
    Tjernstrom, Michael
    On the Relationship between Thermodynamic Structure and Cloud Top, and Its Climate Significance in the Arctic2012In: Journal of Climate, ISSN 0894-8755, E-ISSN 1520-0442, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 2374-2393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cloud and thermodynamic characteristics from three Arctic observation sites are investigated to understand the collocation between low-level clouds and temperature inversions. A regime where cloud top was 100-200 m above the inversion base [cloud inside inversion (CII)] was frequently observed at central Arctic Ocean sites, while observations from Barrow, Alaska, indicate that cloud tops were more frequently constrained to inversion base height [cloud capped by inversion (CCI)]. Cloud base and top heights were lower, and temperature inversions were also stronger and deeper, during CII cases. Both cloud regimes were often decoupled from the surface except for CCI over Barrow. In-cloud lapse rates differ and suggest increased cloud-mixing potential for CII cases. Specific humidity inversions were collocated with temperature inversions for more than 60% of the CCI and more than 85% of the CII regimes. Horizontal advection of heat and moisture is hypothesized as an important process controlling thermodynamic structure and efficiency of cloud-generated motions. The portion of CII clouds above the inversion contains cloud radar signatures consistent with cloud droplets. The authors test the longwave radiative impact of cloud liquid above the inversion through hypothetical liquid water distributions. Optically thin CII clouds alter the effective cloud emission temperature and can lead to an increase in surface flux on the order of 1.5 W m(-2) relative to the same cloud but whose top does not extend above the inversion base. The top of atmosphere impact is even larger, increasing outgoing longwave radiation up to 10 W m(-2). These results suggest a potentially significant longwave radiative forcing via simple liquid redistributions for a distinctly dominant cloud regime over sea ice.

  • 153.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Tjernstrom, Michael
    Clouds, warm air, and a climate cooling signal over the summer Arctic2017In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 1095-1103Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Sheldon, Johnston, Marston
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Eliasson, S.
    Eriksson, P.
    Forbes, R. M.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Zelinka, M. D.
    Diagnosing the average spatio-temporal impact of convective systems - Part 1: A methodology for evaluating climate models2013In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 13, no 23, p. 12043-12058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An earlier method to determine the mean response of upper-tropospheric water to localised deep convective systems (DC systems) is improved and applied to the EC-Earth climate model. Following Zelinka and Hartmann (2009), several fields related to moist processes and radiation from various satellites are composited with respect to the local maxima in rain rate to determine their spatio-temporal evolution with deep convection in the central Pacific Ocean. Major improvements to the earlier study are the isolation of DC systems in time so as to prevent multiple sampling of the same event, and a revised definition of the mean background state that allows for better characterisation of the DC-system-induced anomalies. The observed DC systems in this study propagate westward at similar to 4 ms(-1). Both the upper-tropospheric relative humidity and the outgoing longwave radiation are substantially perturbed over a broad horizontal extent and for periods > 30 h. The cloud fraction anomaly is fairly constant with height but small maximum can be seen around 200 hPa. The cloud ice water content anomaly is mostly confined to pressures greater than 150 hPa and reaches its maximum around 450 hPa, a few hours after the peak convection. Consistent with the large increase in upper-tropospheric cloud ice water content, albedo increases dramatically and persists about 30 h after peak convection. Applying the compositing technique to EC-Earth allows an assessment of the model representation of DC systems. The model captures the large-scale responses, most notably for outgoing longwave radiation, but there are a number of important differences. DC systems appear to propagate east-ward in the model, suggesting a strong link to Kelvin waves instead of equatorial Rossby waves. The diurnal cycle in the model is more pronounced and appears to trigger new convection further to the west each time. Finally, the modelled ice water content anomaly peaks at pressures greater than 500 hPa and in the upper troposphere between 250 hPa and 500 hPa, there is less ice than the observations and it does not persist as long after peak convection. The modelled upper-tropospheric cloud fraction anomaly, however, is of a comparable magnitude and exhibits a similar longevity as the observations.

  • 155.
    Sheldon, Johnston, Marston
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Eliasson, Salomon
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Eriksson, P.
    Forbes, R. M.
    Gettelman, A.
    Raisanen, P.
    Zelinka, M. D.
    Diagnosing the average spatio-temporal impact of convective systems - Part 2: A model intercomparison using satellite data2014In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 14, no 16, p. 8701-8721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The representation of the effect of tropical deep convective (DC) systems on upper-tropospheric moist processes and outgoing longwave radiation is evaluated in the EC-Earth3, ECHAM6, and CAM5 (Community Atmosphere Model) climate models using satellite-retrieved data. A composite technique is applied to thousands of deep convective systems that are identified using local rain rate maxima in order to focus on the temporal evolution of the deep convective processes in the model and satellite-retrieved data. The models tend to over-predict the occurrence of rain rates that are less than approximate to 3 mm h(-1) compared to Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA). While the diurnal distribution of oceanic rain rate maxima in the models is similar to the satellite-retrieved data, the land-based maxima are out of phase. Despite having a larger climatological mean uppertropospheric relative humidity, models closely capture the satellite-derived moistening of the upper troposphere following the peak rain rate in the deep convective systems. Simulated cloud fractions near the tropopause are larger than in the satellite data, but the ice water contents are smaller compared with the satellite-retrieved ice data. The models capture the evolution of ocean-based deep convective systems fairly well, but the land-based systems show significant discrepancies. Over land, the diurnal cycle of rain is too intense, with deep convective systems occurring at the same position on subsequent days, while the satellite-retrieved data vary more in timing and geographical location. Finally, simulated outgoing longwave radiation anomalies associated with deep convection are in reasonable agreement with the satellite data, as well as with each other. Given the fact that there are strong disagreements with, for example, cloud ice water content, and cloud fraction, between the models, this study supports the hypothesis that such agreement with satellite-retrieved data is achieved in the three models due to different representations of deep convection processes and compensating errors.

  • 156.
    Sheldon, Johnston, Marston
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Eriksson, P.
    Eliasson, Salomon
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Forbes, R. M.
    Murtagh, D. P.
    The representation of tropical upper tropospheric water in EC Earth V22012In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 39, no 11, p. 2713-2731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tropical upper tropospheric humidity, clouds, and ice water content, as well as outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), are evaluated in the climate model EC Earth with the aid of satellite retrievals. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and Microwave Limb Sounder together provide good coverage of relative humidity. EC Earth's relative humidity is in fair agreement with these observations. CloudSat and CALIPSO data are combined to provide cloud fractions estimates throughout the altitude region considered (500-100 hPa). EC Earth is found to overestimate the degree of cloud cover above 200 hPa and underestimate it below. Precipitating and non-precipitating EC Earth ice definitions are combined to form a complete ice water content. EC Earth's ice water content is below the uncertainty range of CloudSat above 250 hPa, but can be twice as high as CloudSat's estimate in the melting layer. CERES data show that the model underestimates the impact of clouds on OLR, on average with about 9 W m(-2). Regionally, EC Earth's outgoing longwave radiation can be similar to 20 W m(-2) higher than the observation. A comparison to ERA-Interim provides further perspectives on the model's performance. Limitations of the satellite observations are emphasised and their uncertainties are, throughout, considered in the analysis. Evaluating multiple model variables in parallel is a more ambitious approach than is customary.

  • 157. Shupe, M. D.
    et al.
    Persson, P. O. G.
    Brooks, I. M.
    Tjernstrom, M.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Mauritsen, T.
    Sjogren, S.
    Leck, C.
    Cloud and boundary layer interactions over the Arctic sea ice in late summer2013In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 13, no 18, p. 9379-9399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations from the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS), in the central Arctic sea-ice pack in late summer 2008, provide a detailed view of cloud-atmosphere-surface interactions and vertical mixing processes over the sea-ice environment. Measurements from a suite of ground-based remote sensors, near-surface meteorological and aerosol instruments, and profiles from radiosondes and a helicopter are combined to characterize a week-long period dominated by low-level, mixed-phase, stratocumulus clouds. Detailed case studies and statistical analyses are used to develop a conceptual model for the cloud and atmosphere structure and their interactions in this environment. Clouds were persistent during the period of study, having qualities that suggest they were sustained through a combination of advective influences and in-cloud processes, with little contribution from the surface. Radiative cooling near cloud top produced buoyancy-driven, turbulent eddies that contributed to cloud formation and created a cloud-driven mixed layer. The depth of this mixed layer was related to the amount of turbulence and condensed cloud water. Coupling of this cloud-driven mixed layer to the surface boundary layer was primarily determined by proximity. For 75% of the period of study, the primary stratocumulus cloud-driven mixed layer was decoupled from the surface and typically at a warmer potential temperature. Since the near-surface temperature was constrained by the ocean-ice mixture, warm temperatures aloft suggest that these air masses had not significantly interacted with the sea-ice surface. Instead, back-trajectory analyses suggest that these warm air masses advected into the central Arctic Basin from lower latitudes. Moisture and aerosol particles likely accompanied these air masses, providing necessary support for cloud formation. On the occasions when cloud-surface coupling did occur, back trajectories indicated that these air masses advected at low levels, while mixing processes kept the mixed layer in equilibrium with the near-surface environment. Rather than contributing buoyancy forcing for the mixed-layer dynamics, the surface instead simply appeared to respond to the mixed-layer processes aloft. Clouds in these cases often contained slightly higher condensed water amounts, potentially due to additional moisture sources from below.

  • 158. Soci, Cornel
    et al.
    Bazile, Eric
    Besson, Francois
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    High-resolution precipitation re-analysis system for climatological purposes2016In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 68, article id 29879Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 159. Sporre, Moa K.
    et al.
    O'Connor, Ewan J.
    Håkansson, Nina
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Thoss, Anke
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Swietlicki, Erik
    Petaja, Tuukka
    Comparison of MODIS and VIIRS cloud properties with ARM ground-based observations over Finland2016In: Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, ISSN 1867-1381, E-ISSN 1867-8548, Vol. 9, no 7, p. 3193-3203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 160. Stengel, M.
    et al.
    Mieruch, S.
    Jerg, M.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Scheirer, Ronald
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Maddux, B.
    Meirink, J. F.
    Poulsen, C.
    Siddans, R.
    Walther, A.
    Hollmann, R.
    The Clouds Climate Change Initiative: Assessment of state-of-the-art cloud property retrieval schemes applied to AVHRR heritage measurements2015In: Remote Sensing of Environment, ISSN 0034-4257, E-ISSN 1879-0704, Vol. 162, p. 363-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cloud property retrievals from 3 decades of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) measurements provide a unique opportunity for a long-term analysis of clouds. In this study, the accuracy of AVHRR-derived cloud properties cloud mask, cloud-top height, cloud phase and cloud liquid water path is assessed using three state-of-the-art retrieval schemes. In addition, the same retrieval schemes are applied to the AVHRR heritage channels of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to create AVHRR-like retrievals with higher spatial resolution and based on presumably more accurate spectral calibration. The cloud property retrievals were collocated and inter-compared with observations from CloudSat, CALIPSO and AMSR-E The resulting comparison exhibited good agreement in general. The schemes provide correct cloud detection in 82 to 90% of all cloudy cases. With correct identification of clear-sky in 61 to 85% of all clear areas, the schemes are slightly biased towards cloudy conditions. The evaluation of the cloud phase classification shows correct identification of liquid clouds in 61 to 97% and a correct identification of ice clouds in 68 to 95%, demonstrating a large variability among the schemes. Cloud-top height (CTH) retrievals were of relatively similar quality with standard deviations ranging from 2.1 km to 2.7 km. Significant negative biases in these retrievals are found in particular for cirrus clouds. The biases decrease if optical depth thresholds are applied to determine the reference CTH measure. Cloud liquid water path (LWP) is also retrieved well with relative low standard deviations (20 to 28 g/m(2)), negative bias and high correlations. Cloud ice water path (IWP) retrievals of AVHRR and MODIS exhibit a relative high uncertainty with standard deviations between 800 and 1400 g/m2, which in relative terms exceed 100% when normalized with the mean IWP. However, the global histogram distributions of IWP were similar to the reference dataset MODIS retrievals are for most comparisons of slightly better quality than AVHRR-based retrievals. Additionally, the choice of different near-infrared channels, 3.7 mu M as opposed to 1.6 mu m, can have a significant impact on the retrieval quality, most pronounced for IWP, with better accuracy for the 1.6 mu m channel setup. This study presents a novel assessment of the quality of cloud properties derived from AVHRR channels, which quantifies the accuracy of the considered retrievals based on common approaches and validation data. Furthermore, it assesses the capabilities of AVHRR-like spectral information for retrieving cloud properties in the light of generating climate data records of cloud properties from three decades of AVHRR measurements. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 161. Stengel, Martin
    et al.
    Schlundt, Cornelia
    Stapelberg, Stefan
    Sus, Oliver
    Eliasson, Salomon
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Meirink, Jan Fokke
    Comparing ERA-Interim clouds with satellite observations using a simplified satellite simulator2018In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 18, no 23, p. 17601-17614Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 162. Stengel, Martin
    et al.
    Stapelberg, Stefan
    Sus, Oliver
    Schlundt, Cornelia
    Poulsen, Caroline
    Thomas, Gareth
    Christensen, Matthew
    Henken, Cintia Carbajal
    Preusker, Rene
    Fischer, Juergen
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    McGarragh, Gregory R.
    Proud, Simon
    Povey, Adam C.
    Grainger, Roy G.
    Meirink, Jan Fokke
    Feofilov, Artem
    Bennartz, Ralf
    Bojanowski, Jedrzej S.
    Hollmann, Rainer
    Cloud property datasets retrieved from AVHRR, MODIS, AATSR and MERIS in the framework of the Cloud_cci project2017In: Earth System Science Data, ISSN 1866-3508, E-ISSN 1866-3516, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 881-904Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 163. Sun, Bomin
    et al.
    Free, Melissa
    Yoo, Hye Lim
    Foster, Michael J.
    Heidinger, Andrew
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Variability and Trends in U.S. Cloud Cover: ISCCP, PATMOS-x, and CLARA-A1 Compared to Homogeneity-Adjusted Weather Observations2015In: Journal of Climate, ISSN 0894-8755, E-ISSN 1520-0442, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 4373-4389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variability and trends in total cloud cover for 1982-2009 across the contiguous United States from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres-Extended (PATMOS-x), and EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring Clouds, Albedo and Radiation from AVHRR Data Edition 1 (CLARA-A1) satellite datasets are assessed using homogeneity-adjusted weather station data. The station data, considered as "ground truth" in the evaluation, are generally well correlated with the ISCCP and PATMOS-x data and with the physically related variables diurnal temperature range, precipitation, and surface solar radiation. Among the satellite products, overall, the PATMOS-x data have the highest interannual correlations with the weather station cloud data and those other physically related variables. The CLARA-A1 daytime dataset generally shows the lowest correlations, even after trends are removed. For the U.S. mean, the station dataset shows a negative but not statistically significant trend of -0.40% decade(-1), and satellite products show larger downward trends ranging from -0.55% to -5.00% decade(-1) for 1984-2007. PATMOS-x 1330 local time trends for U.S. mean cloud cover are closest to those in the station data, followed by the PATMOS-x diurnally corrected dataset and ISCCP, with CLARA-A1 having a large negative trend contrasting strongly with the station data. These results tend to validate the usefulness of weather station cloud data for monitoring changes in cloud cover, and they show that the long-term stability of satellite cloud datasets can be assessed by comparison to homogeneity-adjusted station data and other physically related variables.

  • 164.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Sensitivity of free tropospheric carbon monoxide to atmospheric weather states and their persistency: an observational assessment over the Nordic countries2014In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 14, no 21, p. 11545-11555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among various factors that influence the long-range transport of pollutants in the free troposphere (FT), the prevailing atmospheric weather states probably play the most important role in governing characteristics and efficacy of such transport. The weather states, such as a particular wind pattern, cyclonic or anticyclonic conditions, and their degree of persistency determine the spatio-temporal distribution and the final fate of the pollutants. This is especially true in the case of Nordic countries, where baroclinic disturbances and associated weather fronts primarily regulate local meteorology, in contrast to the lower latitudes where a convective paradigm plays a similarly important role. Furthermore, the long-range transport of pollutants in the FT has significant contribution to the total column burden over the Nordic countries. However, there is insufficient knowledge on the large-scale co-variability of pollutants in the FT and atmospheric weather states based solely on observational data over this region. The present study attempts to quantify and understand this statistical co-variability while providing relevant meteorological background. To that end, we select eight weather states that predominantly occur over the Nordic countries and three periods of their persistency (3 days, 5 days, and 7 days), thus providing in total 24 cases to investigate sensitivity of free tropospheric carbon monoxide, an ideal tracer for studying pollutant transport, to these selected weather states. The eight states include four dominant wind directions (namely, NW, NE, SE and SW), cyclonic and anticyclonic conditions, and the enhanced positive and negative phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). For our sensitivity analysis, we use recently released Version 6 retrievals of CO at 500 hPa from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard Aqua satellite covering the 11-year period from September 2002 through August 2013 and winds from the ECMWF's ERA-Interim project to classify weather states for the same 11-year period. We show that, among the various weather states studied here, southeasterly winds lead to highest observed CO anomalies (up to +8%) over the Nordic countries while transporting pollution from the central and eastern parts of Europe. The second (up to +4%) and third highest (up to +2.5%) CO anomalies are observed when winds are northwesterly (facilitating inter-continental transport from polluted North American regions) and during the enhanced positive phase of the NAO respectively. Higher than normal CO anomalies are observed during anticyclonic conditions (up to +1%) compared to cyclonic conditions. The cleanest conditions are observed when winds are northeasterly and during the enhanced negative phases of the NAO, when relatively clean Arctic air masses are transported over the Nordic regions in the both cases. In the case of nearly all weather states, the CO anomalies consistently continue to increase or decrease as the degree of persistency of a weather state is increased. The results of this sensitivity study further provide an observational basis for the process-oriented evaluation of chemistry transport models, especially with regard to the representation of large-scale coupling of chemistry and local weather states and its role in the long-range transport of pollutants in such models.

  • 165.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Kahnert, Michael
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Exploiting the favourable alignment of CALIPSO's descending orbital tracks over Sweden to study aerosol characteristics2013In: Tellus. Series B, Chemical and physical meteorology, ISSN 0280-6509, E-ISSN 1600-0889, Vol. 65, article id 21155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the key knowledge gaps when estimating aerosol forcing and their role in air quality is our limited understanding of their vertical distribution. As an active lidar in space, the CALIOP-CALIPSO is helping to close this gap. The descending orbital track of CALIPSO follows elongated semi-major axis of Sweden, slicing its atmosphere every 2-3 d, thus providing a unique opportunity to characterise aerosols and their verticality in all seasons irrespective of solar conditions. This favourable orbital configuration of CALIPSO over Sweden is exploited in the present study. Using five years of night-time aerosol observations (2006-2011), we investigated the vertical distribution of aerosols. The role of temperature inversions and winds in governing this distribution is additionally investigated using collocated AIRS-Aqua and ERA-Interim Reanalysis data. It is found that the majority of aerosols (up to 70%) are located within 1 km above the surface in the lowermost troposphere, irrespective of the season. In summer, convection and stronger mixing lift aerosols to slightly higher levels, but their noticeable presence in the upper free troposphere is observed in the winter half of the year, when the boundary layer is decoupled due to strong temperature inversions separating local sources from the transport component. When southerly winds prevail, two or more aerosol layers are most frequent over southern Sweden and the polluted air masses have higher AOD values. The depolarisation ratio and integrated attenuated backscatter of these aerosol layers are also higher. About 30-50% of all aerosol layers are located below the level where temperature inversions peak. On the other hand, relatively cleaner conditions are observed when the winds have a northerly component.

  • 166.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Kahnert, Michael
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Andersson, Camilla
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Kokkola, H.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Langner, Joakim
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Integration of prognostic aerosol-cloud interactions in a chemistry transport model coupled offline to a regional climate model2015In: Geoscientific Model Development, ISSN 1991-959X, E-ISSN 1991-9603, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 1885-1898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To reduce uncertainties and hence to obtain a better estimate of aerosol (direct and indirect) radiative forcing, next generation climate models aim for a tighter coupling between chemistry transport models and regional climate models and a better representation of aerosol-cloud interactions. In this study, this coupling is done by first forcing the Rossby Center regional climate model (RCA4) with ERA-Interim lateral boundaries and sea surface temperature (SST) using the standard cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) formulation (hereafter, referred to as the 'stand-alone RCA4 version' or 'CTRL' simulation). In the stand-alone RCA4 version, CDNCs are constants distinguishing only between land and ocean surface. The meteorology from this simulation is then used to drive the chemistry transport model, Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH), which is coupled online with the aerosol dynamics model, Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications (SALSA). CDNC fields obtained from MATCH-SALSA are then fed back into a new RCA4 simulation. In this new simulation (referred to as 'MOD' simulation), all parameters remain the same as in the first run except for the CDNCs provided by MATCH-SALSA. Simulations are carried out with this model setup for the period 2005-2012 over Europe, and the differences in cloud microphysical properties and radiative fluxes as a result of local CDNC changes and possible model responses are analysed. Our study shows substantial improvements in cloud microphysical properties with the input of the MATCH-SALSA derived 3-D CDNCs compared to the stand-alone RCA4 version. This model setup improves the spatial, seasonal and vertical distribution of CDNCs with a higher concentration observed over central Europe during boreal summer (JJA) and over eastern Europe and Russia during winter (DJF). Realistic cloud droplet radii (CD radii) values have been simulated with the maxima reaching 13 mu m, whereas in the stand-alone version the values reached only 5 mu m. A substantial improvement in the distribution of the cloud liquid-water paths (CLWP) was observed when compared to the satellite retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the boreal summer months. The median and standard deviation values from the 'MOD' simulation are closer to observations than those obtained using the stand-alone RCA4 version. These changes resulted in a significant decrease in the total annual mean net fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) by -5 W m(-2) over the domain selected in the study. The TOA net fluxes from the 'MOD' simulation show a better agreement with the retrievals from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument. The aerosol indirect effects are estimated in the 'MOD' simulation in comparison to the pre-industrial aerosol emissions (1900). Our simulations estimated the domain averaged annual mean total radiative forcing of -0.64 W m(-2) with a larger contribution from the first indirect aerosol effect (-0.57 W m(-2)) than from the second indirect aerosol effect (-0.14 W m(-2)).

  • 167.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Suntharalingam, P.
    Pozzoli, L.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Kloster, S.
    Rast, S.
    Feichter, J.
    Lenton, T. M.
    Rate of non-linearity in DMS aerosol-cloud-climate interactions2011In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 11, no 21, p. 11175-11183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The degree of non-linearity in DMS-cloud-climate interactions is assessed using the ECHAM5-HAMMOZ model by taking into account end-to-end aerosol chemistry-cloud microphysics link. The evaluation is made over the Southern oceans in austral summer, a region of minimal anthropogenic influence. In this study, we compare the DMS-derived changes in the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties between a baseline simulation with the ocean DMS emissions from a prescribed climatology, and a scenario where the DMS emissions are doubled. Our results show that doubling the DMS emissions in the current climate results in a non-linear response in atmospheric DMS burden and subsequently, in SO2 and H2SO4 burdens due to inadequate OH oxidation. The aerosol optical depth increases by only similar to 20% in the 30 degrees S-75 degrees S belt in the SH summer months. This increases the vertically integrated cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) by 25 %. Since the vertically integrated liquid water vapor is constant in our model simulations, an increase in CDNC leads to a reduction in cloud droplet radius of 3.4 % over the Southern oceans in summer. The equivalent increase in cloud liquid water path is 10.7 %. The above changes in cloud microphysical properties result in a change in global annual mean radiative forcing at the TOA of -1.4 W m(-2). The results suggest that the DMS-cloud microphysics link is highly non-linear. This has implications for future studies investigating the DMS-cloud climate feedbacks in a warming world and for studies evaluating geoengineering options to counteract warming by modulating low level marine clouds.

  • 168.
    Thomas, Manu Anna
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Suntharalingam, P.
    Pozzoli, L.
    Rast, S.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Kloster, S.
    Feichter, J.
    Lenton, T. M.
    Quantification of DMS aerosol-cloud-climate interactions using the ECHAM5-HAMMOZ model in a current climate scenario2010In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 10, no 15, p. 7425-7438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contribution of ocean dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emissions to changes in cloud microphysical properties is quantified seasonally and globally for present day climate conditions using an aerosol-chemistry-climate general circulation model, ECHAM5-HAMMOZ, coupled to a cloud microphysics scheme. We evaluate DMS aerosol-cloud-climate linkages over the southern oceans where anthropogenic influence is minimal. The changes in the number of activated particles, cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), cloud droplet effective radius, cloud cover and the radiative forcing are examined by analyzing two simulations: a baseline simulation with ocean DMS emissions derived from a prescribed climatology and one in which the ocean DMS emissions are switched off. Our simulations show that the model realistically simulates the seasonality in the number of activated particles and CDNC, peaking during Southern Hemisphere (SH) summer coincident with increased phyto-plankton blooms and gradually declining with a minimum in SH winter. In comparison to a simulation with no DMS, the CDNC level over the southern oceans is 128% larger in the baseline simulation averaged over the austral summer months. Our results also show an increased number of smaller sized cloud droplets during this period. We estimate a maximum decrease of up to 15-18% in the droplet radius and a mean increase in cloud cover by around 2.5% over the southern oceans during SH summer in the simulation with ocean DMS compared to when the DMS emissions are switched off. The global annual mean top of the atmosphere DMS aerosol all sky radiative forcing is -2.03 W/m(2), whereas, over the southern oceans during SH summer, the mean DMS aerosol radiative forcing reaches -9.32 W/m(2).

  • 169.
    Thomas, Manu
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Typical meteorological conditions associated with extreme nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution events over Scandinavia2017In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 17, no 19, p. 12071-12080Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 170.
    Thomas, Manu
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Koenigk, Torben
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Roberts, Malcolm
    Roberts, Christopher
    Lohmann, Katja
    A statistical and process-oriented evaluation of cloud radiative effects in high-resolution global models2019In: Geoscientific Model Development, ISSN 1991-959X, E-ISSN 1991-9603, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 1679-1702Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Thomas, Manu
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    L'Ecuyer, Tristan
    Wang, Shiyu
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Koenigk, Torben
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Snowfall distribution and its response to the Arctic Oscillation: an evaluation of HighResMIP models in the Arctic using CPR/CloudSat observations2019In: Geoscientific Model Development, ISSN 1991-959X, E-ISSN 1991-9603, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 3759-3772Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 172.
    Thomas, Manu
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Tjernstrom, Michael
    Ekman, Annica M. L.
    The Relation Between Aerosol Vertical Distribution and Temperature Inversions in the Arctic in Winter and Spring2019In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 2836-2845Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 173. Tjernstrom, M.
    et al.
    Birch, C. E.
    Brooks, I. M.
    Shupe, M. D.
    Persson, P. O. G.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Mauritsen, T.
    Leck, C.
    Paatero, J.
    Szczodrak, M.
    Wheeler, C. R.
    Meteorological conditions in the central Arctic summer during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS)2012In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 12, no 15, p. 6863-6889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the rapidly changing climate in the Arctic is limited by a lack of understanding of underlying strong feedback mechanisms that are specific to the Arctic. Progress in this field can only be obtained by process-level observations; this is the motivation for intensive ice-breaker-based campaigns such as the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS), described here. However, detailed field observations also have to be put in the context of the larger-scale meteorology, and short field campaigns have to be analysed within the context of the underlying climate state and temporal anomalies from this. To aid in the analysis of other parameters or processes observed during this campaign, this paper provides an overview of the synoptic-scale meteorology and its climatic anomaly during the ASCOS field deployment. It also provides a statistical analysis of key features during the campaign, such as key meteorological variables, the vertical structure of the lower troposphere and clouds, and energy fluxes at the surface. In order to assess the representativity of the ASCOS results, we also compare these features to similar observations obtained during three earlier summer experiments in the Arctic Ocean: the AOE-96, SHEBA and AOE-2001 expeditions. We find that these expeditions share many key features of the summertime lower troposphere. Taking ASCOS and the previous expeditions together, a common picture emerges with a large amount of low-level cloud in a well-mixed shallow boundary layer, capped by a weak to moderately strong inversion where moisture, and sometimes also cloud top, penetrate into the lower parts of the inversion. Much of the boundary-layer mixing is due to cloud-top cooling and subsequent buoyant overturning of the cloud. The cloud layer may, or may not, be connected with surface processes depending on the depths of the cloud and surface-based boundary layers and on the relative strengths of surface-shear and cloud-generated turbulence. The latter also implies a connection between the cloud layer and the free troposphere through entrainment at cloud top.

  • 174. Tjernstrom, M.
    et al.
    Leck, C.
    Birch, C. E.
    Bottenheim, J. W.
    Brooks, B. J.
    Brooks, I. M.
    Backlin, L.
    Chang, Y. -W
    de Leeuw, G.
    Di Liberto, L.
    de la Rosa, S.
    Granath, E.
    Graus, M.
    Hansel, A.
    Heintzenberg, J.
    Held, A.
    Hind, A.
    Johnston, P.
    Knulst, J.
    Martin, M.
    Matrai, P. A.
    Mauritsen, T.
    Mueller, M.
    Norris, S. J.
    Orellana, M. V.
    Orsini, D. A.
    Paatero, J.
    Persson, P. O. G.
    Gao, Q.
    Rauschenberg, C.
    Ristovski, Z.
    Sedlar, Joseph
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Shupe, M. D.
    Sierau, B.
    Sirevaag, A.
    Sjogren, S.
    Stetzer, O.
    Swietlicki, E.
    Szczodrak, M.
    Vaattovaara, P.
    Wahlberg, N.
    Westberg, M.
    Wheeler, C. R.
    The Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS): overview and experimental design2014In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 2823-2869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The climate in the Arctic is changing faster than anywhere else on earth. Poorly understood feedback processes relating to Arctic clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions contribute to a poor understanding of the present changes in the Arctic climate system, and also to a large spread in projections of future climate in the Arctic. The problem is exacerbated by the paucity of research-quality observations in the central Arctic. Improved formulations in climate models require such observations, which can only come from measurements in situ in this difficult-to-reach region with logistically demanding environmental conditions. The Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) was the most extensive central Arctic Ocean expedition with an atmospheric focus during the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. ASCOS focused on the study of the formation and life cycle of low-level Arctic clouds. ASCOS departed from Longyearbyen on Svalbard on 2 August and returned on 9 September 2008. In transit into and out of the pack ice, four short research stations were undertaken in the Fram Strait: two in open water and two in the marginal ice zone. After traversing the pack ice northward, an ice camp was set up on 12 August at 87 degrees 21' N, 01 degrees 29' W and remained in operation through 1 September, drifting with the ice. During this time, extensive measurements were taken of atmospheric gas and particle chemistry and physics, mesoscale and boundary-layer meteorology, marine biology and chemistry, and upper ocean physics. ASCOS provides a unique interdisciplinary data set for development and testing of new hypotheses on cloud processes, their interactions with the sea ice and ocean and associated physical, chemical, and biological processes and interactions. For example, the first-ever quantitative observation of bubbles in Arctic leads, combined with the unique discovery of marine organic material, polymer gels with an origin in the ocean, inside cloud droplets suggests the possibility of primary marine organically derived cloud condensation nuclei in Arctic stratocumulus clouds. Direct observations of surface fluxes of aerosols could, however, not explain observed variability in aerosol concentrations, and the balance between local and remote aerosols sources remains open. Lack of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was at times a controlling factor in low-level cloud formation, and hence for the impact of clouds on the surface energy budget. ASCOS provided detailed measurements of the surface energy balance from late summer melt into the initial autumn freeze-up, and documented the effects of clouds and storms on the surface energy balance during this transition. In addition to such process-level studies, the unique, independent ASCOS data set can and is being used for validation of satellite retrievals, operational models, and reanalysis data sets.

  • 175.
    Trolez, Matthieu
    et al.
    SMHI.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Johnston, Sheldon
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Albert, Peter
    SMHI.
    The impact of varying NWP background information on CM-SAF cloud products: Visiting Scientist Report Climate Monitoring SAF (CM-SAF)2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of using ancillary data from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models in the derivation of cloud parameters from satellite data in the Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility (CM-SAF) project. In particular, the sensitivity to the NWP-analysed surface temperature parameter was studied.A one-year dataset of satellite images over the Scandinavian region from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the polar orbiting NOAA satellites was studied. Cloud products were generated by use of the Polar Platform System (PPS) cloud software and the sensitivity to perturbations of the NWP-analysed surface temperature was investigated. In addition, a study on the importance of the chosen NWP model was also included. Results based on three different NWP models (ECMWF, HIRLAM and GME) were analysed.It was concluded that the NWP model influence on the results appears to be small. An interchange of NWP model analysis input data to the PPS cloud processing method did only lead to marginal changes of the resulting CM-SAF cloud products. Thus, the current CM-SAF cloud algorithmsproduce robust results that are not heavily dependent on NWP model background information. Nevertheless, the study demonstrated a natural high sensitivity to the NWP-analysed surface skin temperature. This parameter is crucial for the a priori determination of the thresholds used for the infrared cloud tests of the PPS method. It was shown that a perturbation of the surface skin temperature of one K generally resulted in a change of cloud cover of about 0.5-1 % in absolute cloud amount units. However, if perturbations were in the range 5-10 K the change in cloud cover increased to values between 1 to 2 % per degree, especially for positive perturbations. Important here is that a positive surface temperature perturbation always leads to an increase in the resulting cloud amounts and vice versa.

  • 176.
    Trolez, Matthieu
    et al.
    SMHI.
    Tetzlaff, Anke
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    CM-SAF Validating the Cloud Top Height product using LIDAR data2005Report (Other academic)
  • 177. Woick, H
    et al.
    Dewitte, S
    Feijt, A
    Gratzki, A
    Hechler, P
    Hollmann, R
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Laine, V
    Lowe, P
    Nitsche, H
    Werscheck, M
    Wollenweber, G
    The satellite application facility on climate monitoring2002In: EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE, OCEAN AND SURFACE STUDIES, 2002, no 11, p. 2405-2410Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring is a joint project of the National Meteorological Services and other institutes from Belgium, Finland, Germany, Sweden and The Netherlands. The objective of the project is to set up a system to provide atmospheric and oceanographic data sets from (primarily) operational geostationary and polar orbiting meteorological satellites for climate monitoring, research and applications at regional European scale, for some products on a global scale. Initial operational SAF products are related to clouds, radiation budget, ocean status and water vapour content in the atmosphere. SAF operations are foreseen to start in 2004. (C) 2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 178. Wu, Dong L.
    et al.
    Baum, Bryan A.
    Choi, Yong-Sang
    Foster, Michael J.
    Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Heidinger, Andrew
    Poulslsen, Caroline
    Pavolonis, Michael
    Riedi, Jerome
    Roebeling, Robert
    Sherwood, Steven
    Thoss, Anke
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Watts, Philip
    TOWARD GLOBAL HARMONIZATION OF DERIVED CLOUD PRODUCTS2017In: Bulletin of The American Meteorological Society - (BAMS), ISSN 0003-0007, E-ISSN 1520-0477, Vol. 98, no 2, p. ES49-ES52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 179. Yom-Tov, Elad
    et al.
    Yom-Tov, Yoram
    Yom-Tov, Shlomith
    Andersen, Mogens
    Rosenfeld, Daniel
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Geffen, Eli
    The complex effects of geography, ambient temperature, and North Atlantic Oscillation on the body size of Arctic hares in Greenland2017In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 120, no 4, p. 909-918Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 180. Zhang, Jianzhong
    et al.
    Kuenzer, Claudia
    Tetzlaff, Anke
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Oertel, Dieter
    Zhukov, Boris
    Wagner, Wolfgang
    Thermal characteristics of coal fires 2: Results of measurements on simulated coal fires2007In: Journal of Applied Geophysics, ISSN 0926-9851, E-ISSN 1879-1859, Vol. 63, no 3-4, p. 135-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present thermal characteristics of coal fires as measured during simulated fires under an experimental setting in Germany in July 2002. It is thus a continuation of the previously published paper "Thermal surface characteristics of coal fire 1: Results of in-situ measurement", in which we presented temperature measurements of real subsurface coal fires in China [Zhang, J., Kuenzer, C., accepted for publication. Thermal Surface Characteristics of Coal Fires 1: Results of in-situ measurements. Accepted for publication at Journal of Applied Geophysics.]. The focus is on simulated coal fires, which are less complex in nature than fires under natural conditions. In the present study we simulated all the influences usually occurring under natural conditions in a controllable manner (uniform background material of known thermal properties, known ventilation pathways, homogeneous coal substrate), creating two artificial outdoor coal fires under simplified settings. One surface coal fire and one subsurface coal fire were observed over the course of 2 days. The set up of the fires allowed for measurements not always feasible under "real" in-situ conditions: thus compared to the in-situ investigations presented in paper one we could retrieve numerous temperature measurements inside of the fires. Single temperature measurements, diurnal profiles and airborne thermal surveying present the typical temperature patterns of a small surface-and a subsurface fire under undisturbed conditions (easily accessible terrain, 24 hour measurements period, homogeneous materials). We found that the outside air temperature does not influence the fire's surface temperature (up to 900 degrees C), while fire centre temperatures of up to 1200 degrees C strongly correlate with surface temperatures of the fire. The fires could heat their surrounding up to a distance of 4.5 m. However, thermal anomalies on the background surface only persist as long as the fire is burning and disappear very fast if the heat source is removed. Furthermore, heat outside of the fires is transported mainly by convection and not by radiation. In spatial thermal line scanner data the diurnal thermal patterns of the coal fire are clearly represented. Our experiments during that data collection also visualize the thermal anomaly differences between covered (underground) and uncovered (surface) coal fires. The latter could not be observed in-situ in a real coal fire area. Subsurface coal fires express a much weaker signal than open surface fires and contrast only by few degrees against the background. In airborne thermal imaging scanner data the fires are also well represented. Here we could show that the mid-infrared domain (3.8 mu m) is more suitable to pick up very hot anomalies, compared to the common thermal (8.8 mu m) domain. Our results help to understand coal fires and their thermal patterns as well as the limitations occurring during their analysis. We believe that the results presented here can practicably help for the planning of coal fire thermal mapping campaigns - including remote sensing methods and the thermal data can be included into numerical coal fire modelling as initial or boundary conditions. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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