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  • 101.
    Räisänen, Jouni
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Doescher, Ralf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Graham, Phil
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    GCM driven simulations of recent and future climate with the Rossby Centre coupled atmosphere - Baltic Sea regional climate model RCAO2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of six general circulation model (GCM) driven regional climate simulations made at the Rossby Centre, SMHI, during the year 2002 are documented. For both the two driving GCMs HadAM3H andECHAM4/OPYC3, a 30-year (1961-1990) control run and two 30-year (2071-2100) scenario runs have been made. The scenario runs are based on the IPCC SRES A2 and B2 forcing scenarios. These simulations were made at 49 km atmospheric resolution and they are part of the European PRUDENCE project.Many aspects of the simulated control climates compare favourably with observations, but some problems are also evident. For example, the simulated cloudiness and precipitation appear generally too abundant in northern Europe (although biases in precipitation measurements complicate the interpretation), whereas too clear and dry conditions prevail in southern Europe. There is a lot of similarity between the HadAM3Hdriven (RCAO-H) and ECHAM4/OPYC3-driven (RCAO-E) control simulations, although the problems associated with the hydrological cycle and cloudiness are somewhat larger in the latter.The simulated climate changes (2071-2100 minus 1961-1990) depend on both the forcing scenario (the changes are generally larger for A2 than B2) and the driving global model (the largest changes tend to occur in RCAO-E). In all the scenario simulations, the warming in northern Europe is largest in winter or autumn. In central and southern Europe, the warming peaks in summer and reaches in the RCAO-E A2 simulation locally 10°C. The four simulations agree on a general increase in precipitation in northern Europe especiallyin winter and on a general decrease in precipitation in southern and central Europe in summer, but the magnitude and the geographical patterns of the change differ a lot between RCAO-H and RCAO-E. Thisreflects very different changes in the atmospheric circulation during the winter half-year, which also have a large impact on the simulated changes in windiness. A very large increase in the lowest minimumtemperatures occurs in a large part of Europe, most probably due to reduced snow cover. Extreme daily precipitation increases even in most of those areas where the mean annual precipitation decreases.

  • 102.
    Räisänen, Jouni
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Rummukainen, Markku
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Bringfelt, Björn
    SMHI.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The First Rossby Centre Regional Climate Scenario - Dynamical Downscaling of CO2-induced Climate Change in the HadCM2 GCM1999Report (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Sahlberg, Jörgen
    et al.
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Törnevik, Håkan
    SMHI.
    A study of large scale cooling in the Bay of Bothnia1980Report (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Schoeffler, Pierre
    SMHI.
    Dissipation, dispersion and stability of numerical schemes for advection and diffusion1982Report (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Segersson, David
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Numerical Quantification of Driving Rain on Buildings2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rain, which is given a horizontal velocity component by the influence of wind, is termed winddriven or driving rain. Driving rain is one of the main sources to the amount of moisture a building is exposed to, and thereby contributes to the processes deteriorating the building envelope. Examples of damages to the building envelope that the onslaught of driving rain directly or indirectly can contribute to are: cracks caused by the freezing of water absorbed in the facade, mould or rot, corrosion of concrete reinforcements and soiling patterns. Knowledge about the exposure of a building to driving rain is needed in order to minimise the deteriorating processes, and thus contributes to ensure a satisfactory performance of the building design.

    This work is meant as an introduction to the field of numerical quantification of driving rain on buildings. Focus is set on three-dimensional simulation of the wind flow and raindrop trajectories using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). lnterest is also paid to some specific properties of rainfall, such as drop size distributions and drag forces on raindrops. The study includes a detailed description of a method to calculate the driving rain distribution on a building, as well as application of the method to a rectangular facade. A qualitative evaluation of the results indicates that the method can be used to calculate the mean distribution of driving rain on simple geometries with sufficient accuracy.

  • 106.
    Strandberg, Gustav
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Bärring, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Hansson, Ulf
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jansson, Christer
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Kupiainen, Marco
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Ullerstig, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    CORDEX scenarios for Europe from the Rossby Centre regional climate model RCA42015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report documents Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) climate model simulations at 50 km horizontal resolution over Europe with the Rossby Centre regional atmospheric model (RCA4) for i) a ERA-Interim-driven (ERAINT) simulation used to evaluate model performance in the recent past climate, ii) historical simulations of the recent decades with forcing from nine different global climate models (GCMs) and iii) future scenarios RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 forced by the same nine different GCMs. Those simulations represent a subset of all CORDEX simulations produced at the Rossby Centre and a general conclusion drawn at the Rossby Centre is that such large ensembles could not have been produced without the establishment of an efficient production chain as outlined here. The first part of this report documents RCA4 and its performance in a perfect boundary simulation where ERAINT was downscaled. RCA4 is to a large extent replicating the large-scale circulation in ERAINT, but some local biases in mean sea level pressure appear. In general the seasonal cycles of temperature and precipitation are simulated in relatively close agreement to observations. Some biases occur, such as too much precipitation in northern Europe and too little in the south. In winter, there is also too much precipitation in eastern Europe. Temperatures are generally biased low in northern Europe and in the Mediterranean region in winter while overestimated temperatures are seen in southeastern Europe in winter and in the Mediterranean area in summer. RCA4 performs generally well when simulating the recent past climate taking boundary conditions from the GCMs. A large part of the RCA4 simulated climate is attributed to the driving GCMs, but RCA4 creates its own climate inside the model domain and adds details due to higher resolution. All nine downscaled GCMs share problems in their representation of the large-scale circulation in winter. This feature is inherited in RCA4. The biases in large-scale circulation induce some biases in temperature and precipitation in RCA4. The climate change signal in the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 ensembles simulated by RCA4 is very similar to what has been presented previously. Both scenarios RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 project Europe to be warmer in the future. In winter the warming is largest in northern Europe and in summer in southern Europe. The summer maximum daily temperature increases in a way similar to summer temperature, but somewhat more in southern Europe. The winter minimum daily temperature in northern Europe is the temperature that changes the most. Precipitation is projected to increase in all seasons in northern Europe and decrease in southern Europe. The largest amount of rainfall per day (and per seven day period) is projected to increase in almost all of Europe and in all seasons. At the same time the longest period without precipitation is projected to be longer in southern Europe. Small changes in mean wind speed are generally projected. There are, however, regions with significant changes in wind. The ensemble approach is a way to describe the uncertainties in the scenarios, but there are other possible ensembles using other models which would give other results. Still, the ensemble used here is found to be similar enough to these other possible ensembles to be representative of the whole set of GCMs. Dynamical downscaling using RCA4 changes the climate change signal, and the ensemble spread is sometimes reduced, but the ensemble of nine RCA4 simulations, using different GCMs, is considered to be representative of the full ensemble. All scenarios agree on a climate change pattern; the amplitude of the change is determined by the choice of scenario. The relative importance of the chosen scenario increases with time.

  • 107.
    Svensson, Jan
    SMHI.
    Remote sensing of atmospheric temperature profiles by TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder1985Report (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Taesler, Roger
    SMHI, Research Department.
    Köldperioden av olika längd och förekomst1986Report (Other academic)
  • 109.
    Thompson, Thomas
    et al.
    SMHI.
    Udin, Ingemar
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Omstedt, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Sea surface temperatures in waters surrounding Sweden1974Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the sub-projects within the sea ice research programme carried out at SMHI deals with the thermodynamics of the sea and the ice. In these studies the sea surface temperature plays a fundamental r ole. During the latest years considerable efforts have been made in order to obtain more temperature observations, in particular from the open sea. Various vessels have been equipped with new instruments, the collection of observations improved, the sea surface temperature distribution analyzed every second day and all information stored in digital form.

    The instruments are discribed and their specifications given in the report. Various observational methods are compared and examples of sea surface temperature analyses for the period July 1973 - July 1974  illustrating yearly variations, tendency to circulation patterns, coastal effects, up-welling etc. are given.

  • 110. Tjernström, M
    et al.
    Rummukainen, Markku
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Bergström, Sten
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Rodhe, J.
    SMHI.
    Persson, Gunn
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Klimatmodellering och klimatscenarier ur SWECLIMs perspektiv2003Report (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Törnevik, Håkan
    SMHI.
    An aerobiological model for operational forecasts of pollen concentration in the air1982Report (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Udin, Ingemar
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Mattisson, Ingemar
    SMHI.
    Havsis- och snöinformation ur datorbearbetade satellitdata – en modellstudie1979Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer programs have been developed for handling of NOAA VHRR digital data. The programs include geometric corrections, presentation of calibration data, derivation of data, variation of grey scales, different presentation forms etc. A SAAB D23 computer has been used for the computations. Line printer has mostly been used for presentation of data, but also electrostatic plotter and ink jet plotter have been used. The analogue VHRR data was digitized at the Swedish Defense Rese·arch Board. The soft ware has mainly been applied to sea ice and snow studies but also in a less degree to studies of sea surface temperature and examination of data, which was supposed to be the oil spill at platform Bravo ·in the Ekofisk area. Digital processed satellite data are more useful than photographic pictures both for sea ice and snow mapping. Quantification of snow cover and sorne ice parameters is possible, but for many purposes a multispectral data analysis is necessary in order to avoid false information. A short sea ice study with computer processed LANDSAT data has also been carried out. The soft ware used was developed at the Swedish Defense Research Board.

  • 113.
    Undén, Per
    Meterologi.
    The Swedish Limited Area Model: Part A. Formulation1982Report (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Wyser, Klaus
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Rummukainen, Markku
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Strandberg, Gustav
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Nordic regionalisation of a greenhouse-gas stabilisation scenario2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of a CO2 stabilisation on the Swedish climate is investigated with the regional climate model RCA3 driven by boundary conditions obtained from a global coupled climate system model (CCSM3). The global model has been forced with observed greenhouse gas concentrations from pre-industrial conditions until today’s, and with an idealised further increase until the stabilisation level is reached. After stabilisation the model integration continues for another 150+ years in order to follow the delayed response of the climate system over a period of time.Results from the global and regional climate model are compared against observations and ECMWF reanalysis for 1961-1990. For this period, the global model is found to be too cold over Europe and with a zonal flow from the North Atlantic towards Europe that is too strong. The climate of the driving global model controls the climate of the regional model and the same deviations from one are thus inherited by the other. We therefore analyse the relative climate changes differences, or ratios, of climate variables between future's and today's climate.Compared to pre-industrial conditions, the global mean temperature changes by about 1.5oC as a result of the stabilisation at 450 ppmv equivalent CO2. Averaged over Europe, the temperature change is slightly larger, and it is even larger for Sweden and Northern Europe. Annual mean precipitation for Europe is unaffected, but Sweden receives more precipitation under higher CO2 levels. The inter-annual and decadal variability of annual mean temperature and precipitation does not change with any significant degree.The changes in temperature and precipitation are not evenly distributed with the season: the largest warming and increased precipitation in Northern Europe occurs during winter months while the summer climate remains more or less unchanged. The opposite is true for the Mediterranean region where the precipitation decreases mostly during summer. This also implies higher summer temperatures, but changes in winter are smaller. No substantial change in the wind climate over Europe is found.

  • 115.
    Zengmao, Wu
    SMHI.
    Numerical analysis of initialization procedure in a two-dimensional lake breeze model1986Report (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Zengmao, Wu
    SMHI.
    Numerical study of lake-land breeze over Lake Vättern, Sweden1986Report (Other academic)
123 101 - 116 of 116
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