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  • 1. Andersen, Jesper H.
    et al.
    Axe, Philip
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Backer, Hermanni
    Carstensen, Jacob
    Claussen, Ulrich
    Fleming-Lehtinen, Vivi
    Jarvinen, Marko
    Kaartokallio, Hermanni
    Knuuttila, Seppo
    Korpinen, Samuli
    Kubiliute, Aiste
    Laamanen, Maria
    Lysiak-Pastuszak, Elzbieta
    Martin, Georg
    Murray, Ciaran
    Mohlenberg, Flemming
    Nausch, Guenther
    Norkko, Alf
    Villnas, Anna
    Getting the measure of eutrophication in the Baltic Sea: towards improved assessment principles and methods2011In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 137-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eutrophication status of the entire Baltic Sea is classified using a multi-metric indicator-based assessment tool. A total of 189 areas are assessed using indicators where information on reference conditions (RefCon), and acceptable deviation (AcDev) from reference condition could be combined with national monitoring data from the period 2001-2006. Most areas (176) are classified as 'affected by eutrophication' and only two open water areas and 11 coastal areas are classified as 'unaffected by eutrophication'. The classification is made by application of the recently developed HELCOM Eutrophication Assessment Tool (HEAT), which is described in this paper. The use of harmonized assessment principles and the HEAT tool allows for direct comparisons between different parts of the Baltic Sea despite variations in monitoring activities. The impaired status of 176 areas is directly related to nutrient enrichment and elevated loads from upstream catchments. Baltic Sea States have implemented nutrient management strategies since years which have reduced nutrient inputs. However, eutrophication is still a major problem for large parts of the Baltic Sea. The 2007 Baltic Sea Action Plan is projected to further reduce nutrient inputs aiming for a Baltic Sea unaffected by eutrophication by 2021.

  • 2. Conley, Daniel J.
    et al.
    Bjorck, Svante
    Bonsdorff, Erik
    Carstensen, Jacob
    Destouni, Georgia
    Gustafsson, Bo G.
    Hietanen, Susanna
    Kortekaas, Marloes
    Kuosa, Harri
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Mueller-Karulis, Baerbel
    Nordberg, Kjell
    Norkko, Alf
    Nuernberg, Gertrud
    Pitkanen, Heikki
    Rabalais, Nancy N.
    Rosenberg, Rutger
    Savchuk, Oleg P.
    Slomp, Caroline P.
    Voss, Maren
    Wulff, Fredrik
    Zillen, Lovisa
    Hypoxia-Related Processes in the Baltic Sea2009In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 3412-3420Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoxia, a growing worldwide problem, has been intermittently present in the modern Baltic Sea since its formation ca. 8000 cal. yr BP. However, both the spatial extent and intensity of hypoxia have increased with anthropogenic eutrophication due to nutrient inputs. Physical processes, which control stratification and the renewal of oxygen in bottom waters, are important constraints on the formation and maintenance of hypoxia. Climate controlled inflows of saline water from the North Sea through the Danish Straits is a critical controlling factor governing the spatial extent and duration of hypoxia. Hypoxia regulates the biogeochemical cycles of both phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in the water column and sediments. Significant amounts of P are currently released from sediments, an order of magnitude larger than anthropogenic inputs. The Baltic Sea is unique for coastal marine ecosystems experiencing N losses in hypoxic waters below the halocline. Although benthic communities in the Baltic Sea are naturally constrained by salinity gradients, hypoxia has resulted in habitat loss over vast areas and the elimination of benthic fauna, and has severely disrupted benthic food webs. Nutrient load reductions are needed to reduce the extent, severity, and effects of hypoxia.

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