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  • 1. Campana, P. E.
    et al.
    Zhang, J.
    Yao, T.
    Andersson, Sandra
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Melton, F.
    Yan, J.
    Managing agricultural drought in Sweden using a novel spatially-explicit model from the perspective of water-food-energy nexus2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 197, p. 1382-1393Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Carlund, Thomas
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Josefsson, Weine
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Comparison and uncertainty of aerosol optical depth estimates derived from spectral and broadband measurements2003In: Journal of applied meteorology (1988), ISSN 0894-8763, E-ISSN 1520-0450, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 1598-1610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An experimental comparison of spectral aerosol optical depth tau(a,lambda) derived from measurements by two spectral radiometers [a LI-COR, Inc., LI-1800 spectroradiometer and a Centre Suisse d'Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) SPM2000 sun photometer] and a broadband field pyrheliometer has been made. The study was limited to three wavelengths ( 368, 500, and 778 nm), using operational calibration and optical depth calculation procedures. For measurements taken on 32 days spread over 1 yr, the rms difference in tau(a,lambda) derived from the two spectral radiometers was less than 0.01 at 500 and 778 nm. For wavelengths shorter than 500 nm and longer than 950 nm, the performance of the LI-1800 in its current configuration did not permit accurate determinations of tau(a,lambda). Estimates of spectral aerosol optical depth from broadband pyrheliometer measurements using two models of the Angstromngstrom turbidity coefficient were examined. For the broadband method that was closest to the sun photometer results, the mean (rms) differences in tau(a,lambda) were 0.014 (0.028), 0.014 (0.019), and 0.013 ( 0.014) at 368, 500, and 778 nm. The mean differences are just above the average uncertainties of the sun photometer tau(a,lambda) values (0.012, 0.011, and 0.011) for the same wavelengths, as determined through a detailed uncertainty analysis. The amount of atmospheric water vapor is a necessary input to the broadband methods. If upper-air sounding data are not available, water vapor from a meteorological forecast model yields significantly better turbidity results than does using estimates from surface measurements of air temperature and relative humidity.

  • 3.
    Dahlgren, Per
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Kållberg, Per
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Gollvik, Stefan
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    A high-resolution regional reanalysis for Europe. Part 1: Three-dimensional reanalysis with the regional HIgh-Resolution Limited-Area Model (HIRLAM)2016In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, ISSN 0035-9009, E-ISSN 1477-870X, Vol. 142, no 698, p. 2119-2131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Dersch, Juergen
    et al.
    Schroedter-Homscheidt, Marion
    Gairaa, Kacem
    Hanrieder, Natalie
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Lindskog, Magnus
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Mueller, Stefan C.
    Santigosa, Lourdes Ramirez
    Sirch, Tobias
    Wilbert, Stefan
    Impact of DNI nowcasting on annual revenues of CSP plants for a time of delivery based feed in tariff2019In: Meteorologische Zeitschrift, ISSN 0941-2948, E-ISSN 1610-1227, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 235-253Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Haase, Gunther
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Dealiasing of Doppler radar velocities using a torus mapping2004In: Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, ISSN 0739-0572, E-ISSN 1520-0426, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1566-1573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel dealiasing algorithm for Doppler radar velocity data has been developed at the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). Unlike most other methods, it does not need independent wind information from other instruments (e.g., nearby radiosonde or wind profiler) or numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. The innovation of the new technique is that it maps the measurements onto the surface of a torus. Dealiased volume radar data can be used in variational assimilation schemes for NWP models through the generation of so-called superobservations. Their use is expected to improve with the introduction of the proposed dealiasing method.

  • 6. Heygster, Georg
    et al.
    Melsheimer, Christian
    Mathew, Nizy
    Toudal, Leif
    Saldo, Roberto
    Andersen, Soren
    Tonboe, Rasmus
    Schyberg, Harald
    Tveter, Frank Thomas
    Thyness, Vibeke
    Gustafsson, Nils
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Dahlgren, Per
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Integrated Observation and Modeling of the Arctic Sea Ice and Atmosphere2009In: Bulletin of The American Meteorological Society - (BAMS), ISSN 0003-0007, E-ISSN 1520-0477, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 293-297Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Josefsson, Weine
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Effect of clouds on UV irradiance: As estimated from cloud amount, cloud type, precipitation, global radiation and sunshine duration2000In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-897X, E-ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 105, no D4, p. 4927-4935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten years of measurements of UV irradiance, monitored by the Robertson-Berger (RB) meter in Norrkoping, 58.58 degrees N, 16.15 degrees E, Sweden, have been combined with concurrent synoptic cloud observations, measurements of sunshine duration, and global radiation to establish the relative influence of clouds on UV irradiance. It is shown that the cloud effect for UV wavelengths is less than for the whole solar spectrum (global radiation). Relations retrieved for global radiation may be used by correcting for the differences. High-level clouds are more transparent than low- and medium-level clouds. As expected, it was found that precipitating clouds in general are more opaque than nonprecipitating clouds. If there is any solar elevation dependency in the effect of clouds, it is small. Using only total cloud amount as parameter to model, the cloud effect on UV irradiance will give a substantial uncertainty, which can be decreased considerably using cloud type and/or information on precipitation conditions. It has also been shown that sunshine duration can be used in a similar way as cloud covet.

  • 8. Koehler, Birgit
    et al.
    Barsotti, Francesco
    Minella, Marco
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Minero, Claudio
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Vione, Davide
    Simulation of photoreactive transients and of photochemical transformation of organic pollutants in sunlit boreal lakes across 14 degrees of latitude: A photochemical mapping of Sweden2018In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 129, p. 94-104Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Koehler, Birgit
    et al.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    Machida, Nanako
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters2014In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 696-711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from inland waters are substantial on a global scale. Yet the fundamental question remains open which proportion of these CO2 emissions is induced by sunlight via photochemical mineralization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), rather than by microbial respiration during DOC decomposition. Also, it is unknown on larger spatial and temporal scales how photochemical mineralization compares to other C fluxes in the inland water C cycle. We combined field and laboratory data with atmospheric radiative transfer modeling to parameterize a photochemical rate model for each day of the year 2009, for 1086 lakes situated between latitudes from 55 degrees N to 69 degrees N in Sweden. The sunlight-induced production of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) averaged 3.8 +/- 0.04 g C m(-2) yr(-1), which is a flux comparable in size to the organic carbon burial in the lake sediments. Countrywide, 151 +/- 1 kt C yr(-1) was produced by photochemical mineralization, corresponding to about 12% of total annual mean CO2 emissions from Swedish lakes. With a median depth of 3.2m, the lakes were generally deep enough that incoming, photochemically active photons were absorbed in the water column. This resulted in a linear positive relationship between DIC photoproduction and the incoming photon flux, which corresponds to the absorbed photons. Therefore, the slope of the regression line represents the wavelength-and depth-integrated apparent quantum yield of DIC photoproduction. We used this relationship to obtain a first estimate of DIC photoproduction in lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Global DIC photoproduction amounted to 13 and 35 Mt C yr(-1) under overcast and clear sky, respectively. Consequently, these directly sunlight-induced CO2 emissions contribute up to about one tenth to the global CO2 emissions from lakes and reservoirs, corroborating that microbial respiration contributes a substantially larger share than formerly thought, and generate annual C fluxes similar in magnitude to the C burial in natural lake sediments worldwide.

  • 10.
    Landelius, Tomas
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Andersson, Sandra
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Abrahamsson, Roger
    MODELLING AND FORECASTING PV PRODUCTION IN THE ABSENCE OF BEHIND-THE-METER MEASUREMENTS2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Landelius, Tomas
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Andersson, Sandra
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Abrahamsson, Roger
    Modelling and forecasting PV production in the absence of behind-the-meter measurements2019In: Progress in Photovoltaics, ISSN 1062-7995, E-ISSN 1099-159X, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 990-998Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Landelius, Tomas
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Andersson, Sandra
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Abrahamsson, Roger
    System imbalance from solar energy trading2018In: 8th Solar International Workshop on Integration of Solar into Power Systems, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Landelius, Tomas
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Andersson, Sandra
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Carlund, Thomas
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Josefsson, Weine
    SMHI, Core Services. SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Karteringen av solstrålningen i Sverige2018In: Polarfront, no 168, p. 31-40Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Landelius, Tomas
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Dahlgren, Per
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Gollvik, Stefan
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Jansson, A.
    Olsson, Esbjörn
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    A high-resolution regional reanalysis for Europe. Part 2: 2D analysis of surface temperature, precipitation and wind2016In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, ISSN 0035-9009, E-ISSN 1477-870X, Vol. 142, no 698, p. 2132-2142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Landelius, Tomas
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Josefsson, Weine
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Methods for cosine correction of broadband UV data and their effect on the relation between UV irradiance and cloudiness2000In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-897X, E-ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 105, no D4, p. 4795-4802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Irradiance measurements on a horizontal surface often deviate from theory where the irradiance is supposed to be proportional to the cosine of the angle of incidence. This discrepancy is known as the cosine error. In this paper, three different methods for cosine error correction are investigated. The simplest method is based on the assumption of an isotropic sky radiance distribution, regardless of sky conditions, and the irradiance is treated as a single component. In the second method the irradiance is divided into one direct solar and one diffuse sky component, where the latter is assumed to have an isotropic distribution. Finally, a third method also divides the irradiance into two components but under the assumption of an anisotropic sky radiance distribution. Irradiances under general sky conditions are found by interpolation between clear and overcast cases on the basis of sunshine duration or cloud cover. The three methods are applied to data from a Robertson-Berger sunburning meter located in Norrkoping, Sweden. Both methods, where the irradiance is divided into two components, produce acceptable and similar results, while the isotropic one-component method does not.

  • 16.
    Landelius, Tomas
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Josefsson, Weine
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Persson, Thomas
    SMHI.
    A system for modelling solar radiation parameters with mesoscale spatial resolution2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, modern analysis systems synthesise meteorological data from a number of sources, e.g.\ round based SYNOP, satellites, radar, etc., into field information which enable us to model radiation at the Earth’s surface on the mesoscale. At the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) we have set up a model system that produce hourly information in terms of field data with a resolution of about 22 ´ 22 km2 for a geographic area covering Scandinavia and the run off region of the Baltic sea.Presently, the model calculates fields of global-, photosynthetically active- (PAR), UV- and direct radiation based on output from a mesoscale analysis system, a high resolution limited area numerical weather prediction model (NWP), an ice model for the Baltic sea together with satellite measurements of total ozone. A spectral clear sky model lies at the heart of the model system. Its output is multiplied by a function which captures the influence of clouds and precipitation. Different cloud effect functions are applied to the different radiation components, with the exception of global- and PAR for which the same relation is assumed.Measurements from the radiation network of SMHI were used for estimation and validation purposes. A first evaluation of the model system suggests that the RMSE for hourly global radiation data is on the order of 28% and about 16% for daily values. These errors are comparable to those obtained for models purely based on synoptic observations (SYNOP) (29% and 13%) . For UV radiation the figures are similar but for the direct radiation component they are worse; 53% and 31% respectively compared to 25% and 15% for the SYNOP models. To some extent the larger errors for the direct component could be explained by its sensitivity to scale differences when model grid squares are validated against point measurements.

  • 17.
    Lindskog, Magnus
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Prognoser av Solstrålning2018In: Polarfront, no 168, p. 41-44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Michelson, Daniel
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Collier, C G
    Haase, Gunther
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Heen, M
    'Down-to-Earth' modelling of equivalent surface precipitation using multisource data and radar2005In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, ISSN 0035-9009, E-ISSN 1477-870X, Vol. 131, no 607, p. 1093-1112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The estimation of surface rainfall from reflectivity data derived from weather radar has been much studied over many years. It is now clear that central to this problem is the adjustment of these data for the impacts of vertical variations in the reflectivity. In this paper a new procedure (known as Down-to-Earth, DTE) is proposed and tested for combining radar measurements aloft with information from a numerical weather-prediction (NWP) model and an analysis system. The procedure involves the exploitation of moist cloud physics in an attempt to account for physical processes impacting on precipitation during its descent from the height of radar echo measurements to the surface. The application of DTE leads to increased underestimation in the radar measurements compared to precipitation gauge observations at short and intermediate radar ranges (0-120 km), but is successful at reducing the bias at further ranges. However the application of DTE does not lead to significant decreases in the random error of the surface rain rate estimate. No improvement is made when attempting to account for the precipitation phase measured by radar. It is concluded that further work on radar data quality control, along with improvements to the NWP model, are essential to improve upon results using such a physically based procedure.

  • 19.
    Michelson, Daniel
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Collier, C. G.
    Attempts to parameterize cloud water profiles using a neural network2004In: Atmospheric Science Letters, ISSN 1530-261X, E-ISSN 1530-261X, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 141-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atmospheric state variables from a Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model are combined with analyzed cloud base heights in a neural network, with the objective to model corresponding cloud water profiles. It was found that the neural network was incapable of resolving the inherently non-linear vertical cloud water distributions. Copyright (C) 2004 Royal Meteorological Society

  • 20. Soci, Cornel
    et al.
    Bazile, Eric
    Besson, Francois
    Landelius, Tomas
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    High-resolution precipitation re-analysis system for climatological purposes2016In: Tellus. Series A, Dynamic meteorology and oceanography, ISSN 0280-6495, E-ISSN 1600-0870, Vol. 68, article id 29879Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 20 of 20
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  • Other style
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