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  • 1.
    Andersson, Lotta
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Arheimer, Berit
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Consequences of changed wetness on riverine nitrogen - human impact on retention vs. natural climatic variability2001In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 93-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The HBV-N model was used for a scenario analysis of changes in nitrogen retention and transport caused by alterations of wetness due to land drainage, lowering of lakes, building of dams and climatic variability in a river basin in south-central Sweden (1885-1994). In general, dams were situated in locations more favourable for retention, compared to the lowered lakes. Rather modest conversions of water bodies only changed nitrogen transport by about 3%. The 180-times-larger increase of (mainly) tile-drained agricultural land had, according to simulations, increased the nitrogen transport by 17%, due to reduced retention. However, compared to human-induced alteration of the landscape N retention, the choice of 10-year periods of climatological data had the overriding effect on the calculated nitrogen transport. Weather-induced variations resulted in a 13% difference in nitrogen retention between various 10-year periods. When the model was driven by climatological data from the driest 10-year period (1905-1914), the estimated average annual load was only half of that obtained with climatological data from the wettest 10-year period (1975-1984).

  • 2. Jacob, Daniela
    et al.
    Petersen, Juliane
    Eggert, Bastian
    Alias, Antoinette
    Christensen, Ole Bossing
    Bouwer, Laurens M.
    Braun, Alain
    Colette, Augustin
    Deque, Michel
    Georgievski, Goran
    Georgopoulou, Elena
    Gobiet, Andreas
    Menut, Laurent
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Haensler, Andreas
    Hempelmann, Nils
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Keuler, Klaus
    Kovats, Sari
    Kroener, Nico
    Kotlarski, Sven
    Kriegsmann, Arne
    Martin, Eric
    van Meijgaard, Erik
    Moseley, Christopher
    Pfeifer, Susanne
    Preuschmann, Swantje
    Radermacher, Christine
    Radtke, Kai
    Rechid, Diana
    Rounsevell, Mark
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Somot, Samuel
    Soussana, Jean-Francois
    Teichmann, Claas
    Valentini, Riccardo
    Vautard, Robert
    Weber, Bjorn
    Yiou, Pascal
    EURO-CORDEX: new high-resolution climate change projections for European impact research2014In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 563-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new high-resolution regional climate change ensemble has been established for Europe within the World Climate Research Program Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (EURO-CORDEX) initiative. The first set of simulations with a horizontal resolution of 12.5 km was completed for the new emission scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 with more simulations expected to follow. The aim of this paper is to present this data set to the different communities active in regional climate modelling, impact assessment and adaptation. The EURO-CORDEX ensemble results have been compared to the SRES A1B simulation results achieved within the ENSEMBLES project. The large-scale patterns of changes in mean temperature and precipitation are similar in all three scenarios, but they differ in regional details, which can partly be related to the higher resolution in EURO-CORDEX. The results strengthen those obtained in ENSEMBLES, but need further investigations. The analysis of impact indices shows that for RCP8.5, there is a substantially larger change projected for temperature-based indices than for RCP4.5. The difference is less pronounced for precipitation-based indices. Two effects of the increased resolution can be regarded as an added value of regional climate simulations. Regional climate model simulations provide higher daily precipitation intensities, which are completely missing in the global climate model simulations, and they provide a significantly different climate change of daily precipitation intensities resulting in a smoother shift from weak to moderate and high intensities.

  • 3.
    Wilk, Julie
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Andersson, Lotta
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Warburton, Michele
    Adaptation to climate change and other stressors among commercial and small-scale South African farmers2013In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 273-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commercial and small-scale farmers in South Africa are exposed to many challenges. Interviews with 44 farmers in the upper Thukela basin, KwaZulu-Natal, were conducted to identify common and specific challenges for the two groups and adaptive strategies for dealing with the effects of climate and other stressors. This work was conducted as part of a larger participatory project with local stakeholders to develop a local adaptation plan for coping with climate variability and change. Although many challenges related to exposure to climate variability and change, weak agricultural policies, limited governmental support, and theft were common to both farming communities, their adaptive capacities were vastly different. Small-scale farmers were more vulnerable due to difficulties to finance the high input costs of improved seed varieties and implements, limited access to knowledge and agricultural techniques for water and soil conservation and limited customs of long-term planning. In addition to temperature and drought-related challenges, small-scale farmers were concerned about soil erosion, water logging and livestock diseases, challenges for which the commercial farmers already had efficient adaptation strategies in place. The major obstacle hindering commercial farmers with future planning was the lack of clear directives from the government, for example, with regard to issuing of water licences and land reform. Enabling agricultural communities to procure sustainable livelihoods requires implementation of strategies that address the common and specific challenges and strengthen the adaptive capacity of both commercial and small-scale farmers. Identified ways forward include knowledge transfer within and across farming communities, clear governmental directives and targeted locally adapted finance programmes.

  • 4. Zandersen, Marianne
    et al.
    Hyytiainen, Kari
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Tomczak, Maciej T.
    Bauer, Barbara
    Haapasaari, Paivi E.
    Olesen, Jorgen Eivind
    Gustafsson, Bo G.
    Refsgaard, Jens Christian
    Fridell, Erik
    Pihlainen, Sampo
    Le Tissier, Martin D. A.
    Kosenius, Anna-Kaisa
    Van Vuuren, Detlef P.
    Shared socio-economic pathways extended for the Baltic Sea: exploring long-term environmental problems2019In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 1073-1086Article in journal (Refereed)
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