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  • 1. Aich, Valentin
    et al.
    Liersch, Stefan
    Vetter, Tobias
    Fournet, Samuel
    Andersson, Jafet
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Calmanti, Sandro
    van Weert, Frank H. A.
    Hattermann, Fred F.
    Paton, Eva N.
    Flood projections within the Niger River Basin under future land use and climate change2016In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 562, p. 666-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assesses future flood risk in the Niger River Basin (NRB), for the first time considering the simultaneous effects of both projected climate change and land use changes. For this purpose, an ecohydrological process-based model (SWIM) was set up and validated for past climate and land use dynamics of the entire NRB. Model runs for future flood risks were conducted with an ensemble of 18 climate models, 13 of them dynamically downscaled from the CORDEX Africa project and five statistically downscaled Earth System Models. Two climate and two land use change scenarios were used to cover a broad range of potential developments in the region. Two flood indicators (annual 90th percentile and the 20-year return flood) were used to assess the future flood risk for the Upper, Middle and Lower Niger as well as the Benue. The modeling results generally show increases of flood magnitudes when comparing a scenario period in the near future (2021-2050) with a base period (1976-2005). Land use effects are more uncertain, but trends and relative changes for the different catchments of the NRB seem robust. The dry areas of the Sahelian and Sudanian regions of the basin show a particularly high sensitivity to climatic and land use changes, with an alarming increase of flood magnitudes in parts. A scenario with continuing transformation of natural vegetation into agricultural land and urbanization intensifies the flood risk in all parts of the NRB, while a "regreening" scenario can reduce flood magnitudes to some extent. Yet, land use change effects were smaller when compared to the effects of climate change. In the face of an already existing adaptation deficit to catastrophic flooding in the region, the authors argue for a mix of adaptation and mitigation efforts in order to reduce the flood risk in the NRB. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2. Hytteborn, Julia K.
    et al.
    Temnerud, Johan
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Alexander, Richard B.
    Boyer, Elizabeth W.
    Futter, Martyn N.
    Froberg, Mats
    Dahne, Joel
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Bishop, Kevin H.
    Patterns and predictability in the intra-annual organic carbon variability across the boreal and hemiboreal landscape2015In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 520, p. 260-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Factors affecting total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in 215 watercourses across Sweden were investigated using parameter parsimonious regression approaches to explain spatial and temporal variabilities of the TOC water quality responses. We systematically quantified the effects of discharge, seasonality, and long-term trend as factors controlling intra-annual (among year) and inter-annual (within year) variabilities of TOC by evaluating the spatial variability in model coefficients and catchment characteristics (e.g. land cover, retention time, soil type). Catchment area (0.18-47,000 km(2)) and land cover types (forests, agriculture and alpine terrain) are typical for the boreal and hemiboreal zones across Fennoscandia. Watercourses had at least 6 years of monthly water quality observations between 1990 and 2010. Statistically significant models (p < 0.05) describing variation of TOC in streamflow were identified in 209 of 215 watercourses with a mean Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency index of 0.44. Increasing long-term trends were observed in 149 (70%) of the watercourses, and intra-annual variation in TOC far exceeded inter-annual variation. The average influences of the discharge and seasonality terms on intra-annual variations in daily TOC concentration were 1.4 and 1.3 mg l(-1) (13 and 12% of the mean annual TOC), respectively. The average increase in TOC was 0.17 mg l(-1) year(-1) (1.6% year(-1)). Multivariate regression with over 90 different catchment characteristics explained 21% of the spatial variation in the linear trend coefficient, less than 20% of the variation in the discharge coefficient and 73% of the spatial variation in mean TOC. Specific discharge, water residence time, the variance of daily precipitation, and lake area, explained 45% of the spatial variation in the amplitude of the TOC seasonality. Because the main drivers of temporal variability in TOC are seasonality and discharge, first-order estimates of the influences of climatic variability and change on TOC concentration should be predictable if the studied catchments continue to respond similarly. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 3. Kalantari, Zahra
    et al.
    Cavalli, Marco
    Cantone, Carolina
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Crema, Stefano
    Destouni, Georgia
    Flood probability quantification for road infrastructure: Data-driven spatial-statistical approach and case study applications2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 581, p. 386-398Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Koutroulis, A. G.
    et al.
    Papadimitriou, L. V.
    Grillakis, M. G.
    Tsanis, I. K.
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Betts, R. A.
    Freshwater vulnerability under high end climate change. A pan-European assessment2018In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 613, p. 271-286Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Kumar, Pankaj
    et al.
    Wiltshire, Andrew
    Mathison, Camilla
    Asharaf, Shakeel
    Ahrens, Bodo
    Lucas-Picher, Philippe
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Christensen, Jens H.
    Gobiet, Andreas
    Saeed, Fahad
    Hagemann, Stefan
    Jacob, Daniela
    Downscaled climate change projections with uncertainty assessment over India using a high resolution multi-model approach2013In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 468, p. S18-S30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the possible regional climate change over South Asia with a focus over India as simulated by three very high resolution regional climate models (RCMs). One of the most striking results is a robust increase in monsoon precipitation by the end of the 21st century but regional differences in strength. First the ability of RCMs to simulate the monsoon climate is analyzed. For this purpose all three RCMs are forced with ECMWF reanalysis data for the period 1989-2008 at a horizontal resolution of similar to 25 km. The results are compared against independent observations. In order to simulate future climate the models are driven by lateral boundary conditions from two global climate models (GCMs: ECHAM5-MPIOM and HadCM3) using the SRES A1B scenario, except for one RCM, which only used data from one GCM. The results are presented for the full transient simulation period 1970-2099 and also for several time slices. The analysis concentrates on precipitation and temperature over land. All models show a clear signal of gradually wide-spread warming throughout the 21st century. The ensemble-mean warming over India is 1.5 degrees C at the end of 2050, whereas it is 3.9 degrees C at the end of century with respect to 1970-1999. The pattern of projected precipitation changes shows considerable spatial variability, with an increase in precipitation over the peninsular of India and coastal areas and, either no change or decrease further inland. From the analysis of a larger ensemble of global climate models using the A1B scenario a wide spread warming (similar to 3.2 degrees C) and an overall increase (similar to 8.5%) in mean monsoon precipitation by the end of the 21st century is very likely. The influence of the driving GCM on the projected precipitation change simulated with each RCM is as strong as the variability among the RCMs driven with one. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 6. Milano, Marianne
    et al.
    Reynard, Emmanuel
    Koplin, Nina
    SMHI.
    Weingartner, Rolf
    Climatic and anthropogenic changes in Western Switzerland: Impacts on water stress2015In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 536, p. 12-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent observed hydro-climatic changes in mountainous areas are of concern as they may directly affect capacity to fulfill water needs. The canton of Vaud in Western Switzerland is an example of such a region as it has experienced water shortage episodes during the past decade. Based on an integrated modeling framework, this study explores how hydro-climatic conditions and water needs could evolve in mountain environments and assesses their potential impacts on water stress by the 2060 horizon. Flows were simulated based on a daily semi-distributed hydrological model. Future changes were derived from Swiss climate scenarios based on two regional climate models. Regarding water needs, the authorities of the canton of Vaud provided a population growth scenario while irrigation and livestock trends followed a business-as-usual scenario. Currently, the canton of Vaud experiences moderate water stress from June to August, except in its Alpine area where no stress is noted. In the 2060 horizon, water needs could exceed 80% of the rivers' available resources in low-to mid-altitude environments in mid-summer. This arises from the combination of drier and warmer climate that leads to longer and more severe low flows, and increasing urban (+40%) and irrigation (+25%) water needs. Highlighting regional differences supports the development of sustainable development pathways to reduce water tensions. Based on a quantitative assessment, this study also calls for broader impact studies including water quality issues. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 7. Navarro-Ortega, Alicia
    et al.
    Acuna, Vicenc
    Bellin, Alberto
    Burek, Peter
    Cassiani, Giorgio
    Choukr-Allah, Redouane
    Doledec, Sylvain
    Elosegi, Arturo
    Ferrari, Federico
    Ginebreda, Antoni
    Grathwohl, Peter
    Jones, Colin
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Rault, Philippe Ker
    Kok, Kasper
    Koundouri, Phoebe
    Ludwig, Ralf Peter
    Merz, Ralf
    Milacic, Radmila
    Munoz, Isabel
    Nikulin, Grigory
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Paniconi, Claudio
    Paunovic, Momir
    Petrovic, Mira
    Sabater, Laia
    Sabater, Sergi
    Skoulikidis, Nikolaos Th.
    Slob, Adriaan
    Teutsch, Georg
    Voulvoulis, Nikolaos
    Barcelo, Damia
    Managing the effects of multiple stressors on aquatic ecosystems under water scarcity. The GLOBAQUA project2015In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 503, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water scarcity is a serious environmental problem in many European regions, and will likely increase in the near future as a consequence of increased abstraction and climate change. Water scarcity exacerbates the effects of multiple stressors, and thus results in decreased water quality. It impacts river ecosystems, threatens the services they provide, and it will force managers and policy-makers to change their current practices. The EU-FP7 project GLOBAQUA aims at identifying the prevalence, interaction and linkages between stressors, and to assess their effects on the chemical and ecological status of freshwater ecosystems in order to improve water management practice and policies. GLOBAQUA assembles a multidisciplinary team of 21 European plus 2 non-European scientific institutions, as well as water authorities and river basin managers. The project includes experts in hydrology, chemistry, biology, geomorphology, modelling, socio-economics, governance science, knowledge brokerage, and policy advocacy. GLOBAQUA studies six river basins (Ebro, Adige, Sava, Evrotas, Anglian and Souss Massa) affected by water scarcity, and aims to answer the following questions: how does water scarcity interact with other existing stressors in the study river basins? How will these interactions change according to the different scenarios of future global change? Which will be the foreseeable consequences for river ecosystems? How will these in turn affect the services the ecosystems provide? How should management and policies be adapted to minimise the ecological, economic and societal consequences? These questions will be approached by combining data-mining, field- and laboratory-based research, and modelling. Here, we outline the general structure of the project and the activities to be conducted within the fourteen work-packages of GLOBAQUA. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 8. Persson, K
    et al.
    Omstedt, Gunnar
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Lenner, M
    Sjodin, A
    Svanberg, P A
    Estimation of trends in urban traffic NOx emissions by an empirical model1999In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 235, no 1-3, p. 367-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A model has been developed to estimate trends in urban traffic NOx emissions by measured NO2 concentrations. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 9. Pisinaras, Vassilios
    et al.
    Yang, Wei
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Bärring, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Gemitzi, Alexandra
    Conceptualizing and assessing the effects of installation and operation of photovoltaic power plants on major hydrologic budget constituents2014In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 493, p. 239-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the effects of land use change from agricultural to photovoltaic parks (PVPs) on the hydrology of an area. Although many environmental effects have been identified and analyzed, only minor attention has been given to the hydrologic effects of the installation and operation of PVPs. The effects of current PVP installation and operation practices on major hydrologic budget constituents (surface runoff, evapotranspiration and percolation) were identified, conceptualized, quantified and simulated using SWAT model. Vosvozis river basin located in north Greece was selected as a test site. Additionally, long-term effects were simulated using dynamically downscaled climate projections by a Regional Climate Model (RCM) driven by 5 different General Circulation Models (GCMs) for the period 2011-2100. Results indicate that surface runoff and percolation potential are significantly increased at the local scale and have to be considered during PVP siting, especially when sensitive and protected ecosystems are involved. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 10. Rafael, S.
    et al.
    Martins, Helena
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Sa, E.
    Carvalho, D.
    Borrego, C.
    Lopes, M.
    Influence of urban resilience measures in the magnitude and behaviour of energy fluxes in the city of Porto (Portugal) under a climate change scenario2016In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 566, p. 1500-1510Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Riml, Joakim
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Worman, Anders
    Kunkel, Uwe
    Radke, Michael
    Evaluating the fate of six common pharmaceuticals using a reactive transport model: Insights from a stream tracer test2013In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 458, p. 344-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantitative information regarding the capacity of rivers to self-purify pharmaceutical residues is limited. To bridge this knowledge gap, we present a methodology for quantifying the governing processes affecting the fate of pharmaceuticals in streaming waters and, especially, to evaluate their relative significance for tracer observations. A tracer test in Sava Brook, Sweden was evaluated using a coupled physical-biogeochemical model framework containing surface water transport together with a representation of transient storage in slow/immobile zones of the stream, which are presumably important for the retention and attenuation of pharmaceuticals. To assess the key processes affecting the environmental fate of the compounds, we linked the uncertainty estimates of the reaction rate coefficients to the relative influence of transformation and sorption that occurred in different stream environments. The hydrological and biogeochemical contributions to the fate of the pharmaceuticals were decoupled, and the results indicate a moderate hydrological retention in the hyporheic zone as well as in the densely vegetated parts of the stream. Biogeochemical reactions in these transient storage zones further affected the fate of the pharmaceuticals, and we found that sorption was the key process for bezafibrate, metoprolol, and naproxen, while primary transformation was the most important process for clofibric acid and ibuprofen. Conversely, diclofenac was not affected by sorption or transformation. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 12. SJODIN, A
    et al.
    LOMAN, G
    Omstedt, Gunnar
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    LONG-TERM CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENTS OF AIR POLLUTANT CONCENTRATIONS, METEOROLOGY AND TRAFFIC ON A RURAL MOTORWAY AND A MODEL VALIDATION1994In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 147, p. 365-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Air concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were continuously monitored at a rural motorway site in Sweden for the period February-December 1990. In addition, local meteorology and traffic parameters were measured in order to validate a dispersion model. Even close to the motorway, the concentrations of CO and NO2 were well below Swedish air quality guidelines. For long-term averages the regional background contributed significantly to the downwind levels. The atmospheric reaction between primary emitted NO and background ozone (O3) tends to be a major source of downwind NO2, also fairly close to the road (10 m from the road shoulder), where the average NO2/NO(x) ratio was approximately 0.4. The validated model employs a percentile analysis on the basis of the HIWAY-2 and CALINE4 models and a separate emission model. The agreement between measured and modelled data, as refered to the 98th percentile, was good for NO2 but moderate for CO. This is probably partly caused by uncertainties in emission factors for CO for heavy vehicles. Since a good agreement was observed between measured and calculated NO(x) concentrations, problems in adequately modelling NO2 are probably associated with uncertainties as to NO2/NO(x) ratios in the exhaust, or the modelling of the O3 reaction.

  • 13. Sjodin, A
    et al.
    Sjoberg, K
    Svanberg, P A
    Backström, Hans
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Verification of expected trends in urban traffic NOx emissions from long-term measurements of ambient NO2 concentrations in urban air1996In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 189, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data from long-term measurements of ambient NO2 concentrations at roof level in 15 Swedish cities have been used to verify expected trends in urban traffic NOx emissions, resulting mainly from the growth in the number of threeway catalyst (TWC) cars in Sweden since the mid 1980s. The results show that, with few exceptions, all cities exhibit a highly significant downward trend in ambient NO2 concentration since the winter season 1986/1987, as regards both winter season averages and 98th percentiles of daily averages, with an average decrease in both cases of approximately 30% through the winter season 1993/1994. The same trend is also observed when meteorological variations between years are taken into account. Corrections for NO2 in background air yield an even stronger downward trend, or an average 40% decrease for the study period. Simultaneously, rough calculations indicate a 30% decrease in urban traffic NOx emissions during the study period. The conclusions are that, since emission calculations always involve a high degree of uncertainty, use of data from long-term measurements of NO2 concentrations in urban air can be very helpful in establishing real-world trends for urban traffic NOx emissions, as soon as NOx-levels are low enough for the NO + ozone reaction to become 'NOx-limited'.

  • 14. Steffens, Karin
    et al.
    Jarvis, Nicholas
    Lewan, Elisabet
    Lindstrom, Bodil
    Kreuger, Jenny
    Kjellström, Erik
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Moeys, Julien
    Direct and indirect effects of climate change on herbicide leaching - A regional scale assessment in Sweden2015In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 514, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is not only likely to improve conditions for crop production in Sweden, but also to increase weed pressure and the need for herbicides. This study aimed at assessing and contrasting the direct and indirect effects of climate change on herbicide leaching to groundwater in a major crop production region in south-west Sweden with the help of the regional pesticide fate and transport model MACRO-SE. We simulated 37 out of the 41 herbicides that are currently approved for use in Sweden on-eight major crop types for the 24 most common soil types in the region. The results were aggregated accounting for the fractional coverage of the crop and the area sprayed with a particular herbicide. For simulations of the future, we used projections of five different climate models as model driving data and assessed three different future scenarios: (A) only changes in climate, (B) changes in climate and land-use (altered crop distribution), and (C) changes in climate, land-use, and an increase in herbicide use. The model successfully distinguished between leachable and non-leachable compounds (88% correctly classified) in a qualitative comparison against regional-scale monitoring data. Leaching was dominated by only a few herbicides and crops under current climate and agronomic conditions. The model simulations suggest that the direct effects of an increase in temperature, which enhances degradation, and precipitation which promotes leaching, cancel each other at a regional scale, resulting ifs a slight decrease in leachate concentrations in a future climate. However, the area at risk of groundwater contamination doubled when indirect effects of changes in land-use and herbicide use, were considered. We therefore concluded that it is important to consider the indirect effects of climate change alongside the direct effects and that effective mitigation strategies and strict regulation are required to secure future (drinking) water resources. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 15. Tonderski, Karin
    et al.
    Andersson, Lotta
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Lindström, Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    St Cyr, Rasmus
    Schoenberg, Ronny
    Taubald, Heinrich
    Assessing the use of delta O-18 in phosphate as a tracer for catchment phosphorus sources2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 607, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Zhang, Daoxi
    et al.
    Lavender, Samantha
    Muller, Jan-Peter
    Walton, David
    Karlson, Bengt
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Kronsell, Johan
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Determination of phytoplankton abundances (Chlorophyll-a) in the optically complex inland water - The Baltic Sea2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 601, p. 1060-1074Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 16 of 16
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