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  • 1.
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Eilola, Kari
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Hordoir, Robinson
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Hall, Per O. J.
    Transport of fresh and resuspended particulate organic material in the Baltic Sea - a model study2011In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fully coupled high-resolution 3-dimensional biogeochemical-physical ocean model including an empirical wave model was used to investigate the long-term average (1970-2007) distributions and transports of resuspended matter and other types of suspended organic matter in the Baltic Sea. Modelled bottom types were compared to observations and the results showed that the model successfully managed to capture the horizontal, as well as the vertical, distribution of the different bottom types: accumulation, transport and erosion bottoms. The model also captured well the nutrient element contents in the sediments. On average the largest contribution of resuspended organic carbon to the transport of total organic carbon is found at erosion and transport bottoms. Although the relative transport of resuspended organic carbon at deeper accumulation bottoms in general is low (< 10% of total), the central parts of the sub-basins act on average as sinks that import organic matter while the more shallow areas and the coastal regions acts as sources of organic carbon in the water column. This indicates that the particulate organic matter produced in erosion and transport areas might be kept in suspension long enough to be transported and settle in less energetic areas, i.e. on accumulation bottoms. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Eilola, Kari
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Kuznetsov, Ivan
    Hall, Per O. J.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    A new approach to model oxygen dependent benthic phosphate fluxes in the Baltic Sea2015In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 144, p. 127-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new approach to model the oxygen dependent phosphate release by implementing formulations of the oxygen penetration depths (OPD) and mineral bound inorganic phosphorus pools to the Swedish Coastal and Ocean Biogeochemical model (SCOBI) is described. The phosphorus dynamics and the oxygen concentrations in the Baltic proper sediment are studied during the period 1980-2008 using SCOBI coupled to the 3D-Rossby Centre Ocean model. Model data are compared to observations from monitoring stations and experiments. The impact from oxygen consumption on the determination of the OPD is found to be largest in the coastal zones where also the largest OPD are found. In the deep water the low oxygen concentrations mainly determine the OPD. Highest modelled release rate of phosphate from the sediment is about 59 x 10(3) t P year(-1) and is found on anoxic sediment at depths between 60-150 m, corresponding to 17% of the Baltic proper total area. The deposition of organic and inorganic phosphorus on sediments with oxic bottom water is larger than the release of phosphorus, about 43 x 10(3) t P year(-1). For anoxic bottoms the release of total phosphorus during the investigated period is larger than the deposition, about 19 x 10(3) t P year(-1). In total the net Baltic proper sediment sink is about 23.7 x 10(3) t P year(-1). The estimated phosphorus sink efficiency of the entire Baltic Sea is on average about 83% during the period. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  • 3. Bjork, Goran
    et al.
    Nordberg, Kjell
    Arneborg, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Bornmalm, Lennart
    Harland, Rex
    Robijn, Ardo
    Odalen, Malin
    Seasonal oxygen depletion in a shallow sill fjord on the Swedish west coast2017In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 175, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Eilola, Kari
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Gustafson, B.G
    Kuznetsov, Ivan
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Neumann, T.
    Savchuk, O. P.
    Evaluation of biogeochemical cycles in an ensemble of three state-of-the-art numerical models of the Baltic Sea2011In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 267-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three state-of-the-art coupled physical–biogeochemical models, the BAltic sea Long-Term large-Scale Eutrophication Model (BALTSEM), the Ecological Regional Ocean Model (ERGOM), and the Swedish Coastal and Ocean Biogeochemical model coupled to the Rossby Centre Ocean circulation model (RCO–SCOBI), are used to calculate changing nutrient and oxygen dynamics in the Baltic Sea. The models are different in that ERGOM and RCO–SCOBI are three-dimensional (3D) circulation models while BALTSEM resolves the Baltic Sea into 13 dynamically interconnected and horizontally integrated sub-basins. The aim is to assess the simulated long-term dynamics and to discuss the response of the coupled physical–biogeochemical models to changing physical conditions and nutrient loadings during the period 1970–2005. We compared the long-term seasonal and annual statistics of inorganic nitrogen, phosphorus, and oxygen from hindcast simulations with those estimated from observations. We also studied the extension of hypoxic bottom areas covered by waters with O2 b2 ml O2 l −1 and cod reproductive volumes comprising waters with salinity N11 and O2 N2 ml O2 l −1 . The models reproduce much of the nutrient biogeochemical cycling in the Baltic proper. However, biases are larger in the Bothnian Sea and Bothnian Bay. No model shows outstanding performance in all aspects but instead the ensemble mean results are better than or as good as the results of any of the individual models. Uncertainties are primarily related to differences in the bioavailable fractions of nutrient loadings from land and parameterizations of key processes like sediment fluxes that are presently not well known. Also the uncertainty related to the initialization of the models in the early 1960s influence the modeled biogeochemical cycles during the investigated period. ©

  • 5.
    Eilola, Kari
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    On the dynamics of oxygen, phosphorus and cyanobacteria in the Baltic Sea; A model study2009In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 75, no 1-2, p. 163-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxygen and phosphorus dynamics and cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea are discussed using results from the Swedish Coastal and Ocean Biogeochemical model (SCOBI) coupled to the Rossby Centre Ocean model (RCO). The high-resolution circulation model is used to simulate the time period from 1902 to 1998 using reconstructed physical forcing and climatological nutrient loads of the late 20th century. The analysis of the results covers the last 30 years of the simulation period. The results emphasize the importance of internal phosphorus and oxygen dynamics, the variability of physical conditions and the natural long-term variability of phosphorus supplies from land on the phosphorus content in the Baltic Sea. These mechanisms play an important role on the variability of available surface layer phosphorus in late winter in the Baltic Sea. The content of cyanobacteria increases with the availability of phosphorus in the surface layers of the Baltic proper and the probability for large cyanobacteria blooms in the model is rapidly increased at higher concentrations of excess dissolved inorganic phosphorus in late winter. The natural increase of phosphorus supplies from land due to increased river runoff since the early 1970s may to a large degree explain the increased phosphorus content in the Baltic proper. Another significant fraction of the increase is explained by the release of phosphorus from increased anoxic areas during the period. These results refer to the long-term variability of the phosphorus cycle. In accordance to earlier publications is the short-term (i.e. interannual) variability of the phosphorus content in the Baltic proper mainly explained by oxygen dependent sediment fluxes. (c) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Karlson, Bengt
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Andersson, Lars
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Kaitala, S.
    Kronsell, Johan
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Mohlin, M.
    Seppala, J.
    Wranne, A. Willstrand
    A comparison of FerryBox data vs. monitoring data from research vessels for near surface waters of the Baltic Sea and the Kattegat2016In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 162, p. 98-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kuznetsov, Ivan
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Neumann, Thomas
    Simulation of carbon dynamics in the Baltic Sea with a 3D model2013In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 111, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A full resolved three-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model ERGOM (Ecological ReGional Ocean model) was used to simulate the carbon dynamics in the Baltic Sea. Here, a simple carbon cycle has been included in the model. This was accomplished by the addition of dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity to the model. Model results of the hindcast simulation (1961-2007) are in a good agreement with observations. Lateral gradients of the alkalinity are well reproduced by the model. A net inorganic carbon transport from the Baltic Sea to the Kattegat is in the range of the results of previous studies. Further, two climate projections with different nutrient load scenarios reflecting the possible development of the carbon system dynamics in the Baltic Sea were conducted. Climate scenario simulations (1961-2100) showed a continuous "acidification effect" of the Baltic Sea that mainly is controlled by changing of the atmospheric pCO(2). However, changes in pH due to other factors (such as changing temperature, primary production) are different for different regions of the sea. Simulated mean total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon decrease in scenarios of climate change despite the increase of total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon loads. The performed climate simulations show that mean total alkalinity decreases by about 150 mmol m(-3) and dissolved inorganic carbon by about 80-120 mmol m(-3). At the same time total alkalinity to salinity relations change in future climate due to that salinity decreases "faster" than alkalinity. Simultaneously, export of the total alkalinity and the dissolved inorganic carbon from the Baltic Sea to the North Sea has the trend to increase from 11% to 18% depending on the climate scenario. C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 8. Laznik, M
    et al.
    Stalnacke, P
    Grimvall, A
    Wittgren, Hans B.
    SMHI.
    Riverine input of nutrients to the Gulf of Riga - temporal and spatial variation1999In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 23, no 1-3, p. 11-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Riverine transport is the, most important pathway for input of nutrients to the Gulf of Riga. The present study focused on updating existing estimates of the riverine nutrient contributions and on improving the favailable information on temporal and spatial variation in such input. The results show that the gulf received an average of 113,300 tons of nitrogen, 2050 tons of phosphorus and 64,900 tons of dissolved silica (DSi) annually during the time period 1977-1995. There was large interannual variation in loads, e.g., a factor two difference was found between the two most extreme years (1984 and 1990); this was attributed mainly to natural variation in water discharge. The seasonal distribution of nutrient loads exhibited a distinct pattern for practically all studied constituents, especially nitrate. Loads were high during the spring-flow and relatively low during the low-flow summer period. Examination of the spatial variation of nutrient loads showed that the Daugava River alone accounted for approximately 60% of the total riverine load. The highest area-specific loads of nitrate and phosphate were observed in the agriculturally dominated Lielupe River, and the highest loads of organic-nitrogen (org-N) and total phophorus (tot-P) were found in the Parnu River. However, the values for all the studied rivers and constituents were rather low (phosphorus) or moderate (nitrogen and silica) compared to those reported for many other drainage areas of the Baltic Sea. This was true despite the inefficient sewage treatment and intensive agriculture in the studied basins in the 1970s and 1980s. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Löptien, Ulrike
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    The influence of increasing water turbidity on the sea surface temperature in the Baltic Sea: A model sensitivity study2011In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the influence of enhanced absorption of sunlight at the sea surface due to increasing water turbidity and its effect on the sea surface temperatures (SST) in the Baltic Sea. The major question behind our investigations is, whether this effect needs to be included in Baltic Sea circulation models or can be neglected. Our investigations cover both, mean state and SST trends during the recent decades. To quantify the impact of water turbidity on the mean state different sensitivity ocean hind-cast experiments are performed. The state-of-the art ocean model RCO (Rossby Centre Ocean model) is used to simulate the period from 1962 to 2007. In the first simulation, a spatially and temporally constant value for the attenuation depth is used, while in the second experiment a climatological monthly mean, spatially varying attenuation coefficient is derived from satellite observations of the diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490 nm. The inclusion of a spatially varying light attenuation leads to significant SST changes during summer. Maximum values of + 0.5 K are reached in the Gulf of Finland and close to the eastern coasts, when compared to a fixed attenuation of visible light of 0.2 m(-1). The temperature anomalies basically match the pattern of increased light attenuation with strongest effects in shallow waters. Secondary effects due to changes in the current system are of minor importance. Similar results are obtained when considering trends. In the absence of long-term basin wide observations of attenuation coefficients, some idealizations have to be applied when investigating the possible influence of long-term changes in water turbidity on the SST. Two additional sensitivity experiments are based on a combination of long-term Secchi depth station observations and the present day pattern of water turbidity, as observed by satellite. We show the potential of increased water turbidity to affect the summer SST trends in the Baltic Sea significantly, while the estimated effect is apparently too small to explain the overall extreme summer trends observed in the Baltic Sea. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 10. Puillat, I.
    et al.
    Farcy, P.
    Durand, D.
    Karlson, Bengt
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Petihakis, G.
    Seppala, J.
    Sparnocchia, S.
    Progress in marine science supported by European joint coastal observation systems: The JERICO-RI research infrastructure2016In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 162, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Skogen, Morten D.
    et al.
    Eilola, Kari
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Hansen, Jorgen L. S.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Molchanov, Mikhail S.
    Ryabchenko, Vladimir A.
    Eutrophication status of the North Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat and the Baltic Sea in present and future climates: A model study2014In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 132, p. 174-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method to combine observations and an ensemble of ecological models has been used to assess eutrophication. Using downscaled forcing from two GCMs under the A1B emission scenario, an assessment of the eutrophication status was made for a control (19702000) and a future climate (20702100) period. By using validation results from a hindcast to compute individual weights between the models, an assessment of eutrophication is done using a set of threshold values. The final classification distinguishes between three categories: problem area, potential problem area, and non-problem area, in accordance with current management practice as suggested by the Oslo and Paris Commissions (OSPAR) and the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM). For the control run the assessment indicates that the Kattegat, the Danish Straits, the Gulf of Finland, the Gotland Basin as well as main parts of the Arkona Basin, the Bornholm Basin, and the Baltic proper may be classified as problem areas. The main part of the North Sea and also the Skagerrak are non-problem areas while the main parts of the Gulf of Bothnia, Gulf of Riga and the entire southeastern continental coast of the North Sea may be classified as potential problem areas. In the future climate scenarios most of the previous potential problem areas in the Baltic Sea have become problem areas, except for the Bothnian Bay where the situation remain fairly unchanged. In the North Sea there seems to be no obvious changes in eutrophication status in the projected future climate.

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