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  • 1. Bowling, L C
    et al.
    Lettenmaier, D P
    Nijssen, B
    Graham, Phil
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Clark, D B
    El Maayar, M
    Essery, R
    Goers, S
    Gusev, Y M
    Habets, F
    van den Hurk, B
    Jin, J M
    Kahan, D
    Lohmann, D
    Ma, X Y
    Mahanama, S
    Mocko, D
    Nasonova, O
    Niu, G Y
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Shmakin, A B
    Takata, K
    Verseghy, D
    Viterbo, P
    Xia, Y L
    Xue, Y K
    Yang, Z L
    Simulation of high-latitude hydrological processes in the Torne-Kalix basin: PILPS phase 2(e) - 1: Experiment description and summary intercomparisons2003In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 38, no 1-2, p. 1-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty-one land-surface schemes (LSSs) participated in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterizations (PILPS) Phase 2(e) experiment, which used data from the Tome-Kalix Rivers in northern Scandinavia. Atmospheric forcing data (precipitation, air temperature, specific humidity, wind speed, downward shortwave and longwave radiation) for a 20-year period (1979-1998) were provided to the 21 participating modeling groups for 218 1/4degrees grid cells that represented the study domain. The first decade (1979-1988) of the period was used for model spin-up. The quality of meteorologic forcing variables is of particular concern in high-latitude experiments and the quality of the gridded dataset was assessed to the extent possible. The lack of sub-daily precipitation, underestimation of true precipitation and the necessity to estimate incoming solar radiation were the primary data concerns for this study. The results from two of the three types of runs are analyzed in this, the first of a three-part paper: (1) calibration-validation runs-calibration of model parameters using observed streamflow was allowed for two small catchments (570 and 1300 km(2)), and parameters were then transferred to two other catchments of roughly similar size (2600 and 1500 km(2)) to assess the ability of models to represent ungauged areas elsewhere; and 2) reruns-using revised forcing data (to resolve problems with apparent underestimation of solar radiation of approximately 36%, and certain other problems with surface wind in the original forcing data). Model results for the period 1989-1998 are used to evaluate the performance of the participating land-surface schemes in a context that allows exploration of their ability to capture key processes spatially. In general, the experiment demonstrated that many of the LSSs are able to capture the limitations imposed on annual latent heat by the small net radiation available in this high-latitude environment. Simulated annual average net radiation varied between 16 and 40 W/m(2) for the 21 models, and latent heat varied between 18 and 36 W/m(2). Among-model differences in winter latent heat due to the treatment of aerodynamic resistance appear to be at least as important as those attributable to the treatment of canopy interception. In many models, the small annual net radiation forced negative sensible heat on average, which varied among the models between - 11 and 9 W/m(2). Even though the largest evaporation rates occur in the summer (June, July and August), model-predicted snow sublimation in winter has proportionately more influence on differences in annual runoff volume among the models. A calibration experiment for four small sub-catchments of the Torne-Kalix basin showed that model parameters that are typically adjusted during calibration, those that control storage of moisture in the soil column or on the land surface via ponding, influence the seasonal distribution of runoff, but have relatively little impact on annual runoff ratios. Similarly, there was no relationship between annual runoff ratios and the proportion of surface and subsurface discharge for the basin as a whole. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2. Groisman, Pavel Ya.
    et al.
    Sherstyukov, Boris G.
    Razuvaev, Vyacheslav N.
    Knight, Richard W.
    Enloe, Jesse G.
    Stroumentova, Nina S.
    Whitfield, Paul H.
    Forland, Eirik
    Hannsen-Bauer, Inger
    Tuomenvirta, Heikki
    Alexandersson, Hans
    SMHI.
    Mescherskaya, Anna V.
    Karl, Thomas R.
    Potential forest fire danger over Northern Eurasia: Changes during the 20th century2007In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 56, no 3-4, p. 371-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant climatic changes over Northern Eurasia during the 20th century have been reflected in numerous variables of economic, social, and ecological interest, including the natural frequency of forest fires. For the former USSR, we are now using the Global Daily Climatology Network and a new Global Synoptic Data Network archive, GSDN, created jointly by U.S. National Climatic Data Center and Russian Research Institute for Hydrometeorological Information. Data from these archives (approximately 1500 of them having sufficiently long meteorological time series suitable for participation in our analyses) are employed to estimate systematic changes in indices used in the United States and Russia to assess potential forest fire danger. We use four indices: (1) Keetch-Byram Drought Index, (KBDI; this index was developed and widely used in the United States); (2) Nesterov, (3) Modified Nesterov, and (4) Zhdanko Indices (these indices were developed and widely used in Russia). Analyses show that after calibration, time series of the days with increased potential forest fire danger constructed using each of these three indices (a) are well correlated and (b) deliver similar conclusions about systematic changes in the weather conditions conducive to forest fires. Specifically, over the Eastern half of Northern Eurasia (Siberia and the Russian Far East) statistically significant increases in indices that characterize the weather conditions conducive to forest fires were found. These areas coincide with the areas of most significant warming during the past several decades south of the Arctic Circle. West of the Ural Mountains, the same indices show a steady decrease in the frequency of "dry weather summer days" during the past 60 yr. This study is corroborated with available statistics of forest fires and with observed changes in drought statistics in agricultural regions of Northern Eurasia. (C) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 3. Nijssen, B
    et al.
    Bowling, L C
    Lettenmaier, D P
    Clark, D B
    El Maayar, M
    Essery, R
    Goers, S
    Gusev, Y M
    Habets, F
    van den Hurk, B
    Jin, J M
    Kahan, D
    Lohmann, D
    Ma, X Y
    Mahanama, S
    Mocko, D
    Nasonova, O
    Niu, G Y
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Schmakin, A B
    Takata, K
    Verseghy, D
    Viterbo, P
    Xia, Y L
    Xue, Y K
    Yang, Z L
    Simulation of high latitude hydrological processes in the Torne-Kalix basin: PILPS phase 2(e) - 2: Comparison of model results with observations2003In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 38, no 1-2, p. 31-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Nilsson, C.
    et al.
    Goyette, S.
    Bärring, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Relating forest damage data to the wind field from high-resolution RCM simulations: Case study of Anatol striking Sweden in December 19992007In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 57, no 1-2, p. 161-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forestry is of major economical importance in Europe, and recent devastating windstorms have pinpointed the vulnerability of this economic sector to windstorms. Forest damage is an important economic issue at a country level and may become even of larger concern under future conditions following global warming. An underlying question is to what extent the storm damage is due to changes in the wind climate compared to the effect of changes in forest management practices? In this paper, the first part of this rather complex problem is tackled. By using the Canadian Regional Climate Model, CRCM, including a physically based gust parameterisation scheme, NCEPNCAR reanalysis wind fields for the windstorm Anatol, on December 3-4, 1999, were downscaled, into a nested set-up, to 2 km resolution. The aim is to relate the simulated storm wind field to the observed distribution of storm damaged forests in Scania in southern Sweden, as a first methodological step towards analysing the effect of future windstorms in Swedish forests at the highest spatial resolution one can afford nowadays. Our results show that the CRCM produced realistic wind field simulations, compared to station observations, of the windstorm event in 1999. The simulated winds were underestimated at the coasts, but in congruence with inland observations. Most of the damaged forest stands were located on south-westerly (SW) slopes, which indicated a south-westerly wind during the wind throw process. This SW wind direction was evident in the early phase of the simulated storm, but then changed into a westerly flow, at an earlier stage than the true observations specified. Further, most damage occurred in the areas of simulated maximum wind speed greater than 30 m s. To conclude, the CRCM has proven to be a useful tool to realistically simulate a forest damaging storm event. Hence, the model could be used for further study cases, preferably driven by a GCM, in order to reveal a greater understanding about recent storms, which in turn helps us evaluate future climate change driven storm conditions. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Bringfelt, Björn
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Graham, Phil
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    The role of aerodynamic roughness for runoff and snow evaporation in land-surface schemes - comparison of uncoupled and coupled simulations2003In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 38, no 1-2, p. 93-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the impact of changes in aerodynamic roughness length for snow-covered surfaces in a land-surface scheme (LSS) on simulated runoff and evapotranspiration. The study was undertaken as the LSS in question produced widely divergent results in runoff, depending on whether it was used in uncoupled one-dimensional simulations forced by observations from the PILPS2e project, or in three-dimensional simulations coupled to an atmospheric model. The LSS was applied in two versions (LSS1 and LSS2) for both uncoupled and coupled simulations, where the only difference between the two versions was in the roughness length of latent heat used over snow-covered surfaces. The results show that feedback mechanisms in temperature and humidity in the coupled simulations were able to compensate for deficiencies in parameterizations and therefore, LSS1 and LSS2 yielded similar runoff results in this case. Since such feedback mechanisms are absent in uncoupled simulations, the two LSS versions produced very different runoff results in the uncoupled case. However, the magnitude of these feedback mechanisms is small compared to normal variability in temperature and humidity and cannot, by themselves, reveal any deficiencies in a parameterization. The conclusion we obtained is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance is important to correctly simulate fluxes and runoff, but feedback mechanisms in a coupled model can partly compensate for errors. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

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