Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Borenäs, Karin
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Lundberg, P
    The Faroe-Bank channel deep-water overflow2004In: Deep-sea research. Part II, Topical studies in oceanography, ISSN 0967-0645, E-ISSN 1879-0100, Vol. 51, no 4-5, p. 335-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 1950s it was recognised that a considerable transport of water from the deeper reaches of the Norwegian Sea into the Atlantic takes place through the Faroe-Bank Channel, which thereby serves as an important source for the renewal of the North Atlantic Deep Water. Consequently, substantial efforts have, over the past decades, been dedicated towards quantifying the overflow as well as clarifying the underlying dynamics. In the present review, an attempt is made to summarise the main body of the observational results as well as some theoretical considerations regarding the dynamical mechanisms. The most prominent characteristic of the Faroe-Bank Channel overflow is that it is a persistent phenomenon with a yearly average deep-water (viz. T<5degreesC) transport of around 2 Sv. Using inviscid rotating hydraulics, the flow through the controlling section at the sill, furthermore, can be reasonably well predicted on the basis of upstream conditions in the Norwegian Sea. After passing the threshold the descending overflow plume is subject to intense mixing, a process very much in the focus of ongoing research. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Fonselius, Stig
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    The upwelling of nutrients in the central Skagerrak1996In: Deep-sea research. Part II, Topical studies in oceanography, ISSN 0967-0645, E-ISSN 1879-0100, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 57-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurements of inorganic nutrients during four expeditions to the Skagerrak, within the SKAGEX programme in 1990 and 1991, form the basis for estimation of the magnitude of potential new primary production caused by upwelling of nutrients in the central part of Skagerrak. Calculations have been made using available transport and upwelling data given in the literature together with the concentrations of nitrogenous nutrients (nitrite, nitrate and ammonia), phosphate and silicate in the lower part of the pycnocline in the upwelling area. The potential new production of organic matter due to upwelling is estimated at 6.15 x 10(6) t C year(-1) based on a vegetative period of 8 months. This corresponds to 190 gC m(-2) year(-1) if distributed over the entire Skagerrak area. A possible contribution to diatom production from the upwelling of silicate is estimated to be 2.09 x 10(6) t C year(-1), which corresponds to 64 gC m(-2) year(-1).

  • 3. Haley, P. J., Jr.
    et al.
    Lermusiaux, P. F. J.
    Robinson, A. R.
    Leslie, W. G.
    Logoutov, O.
    Cossarini, G.
    Liang, X. S.
    Moreno, P.
    Ramp, S. R.
    Doyle, J. D.
    Bellingham, J.
    Chavez, F.
    Sheldon, Johnston, Marston
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Forecasting and reanalysis in the Monterey Bay/California Current region for the Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network-II experiment2009In: Deep-sea research. Part II, Topical studies in oceanography, ISSN 0967-0645, E-ISSN 1879-0100, Vol. 56, no 3-5, p. 127-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the August-September 2003 Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network-II experiment, the Harvard Ocean Prediction System (HOPS) and Error Subspace Statistical Estimation (ESSE) system were utilized in real-time to forecast physical fields and uncertainties, assimilate various ocean measurements (CTD, AUVs, gliders and SST data), provide suggestions for adaptive sampling, and guide dynamical investigations. The qualitative evaluations of the forecasts showed that many of the surface ocean features were predicted, but that their detailed positions and shapes were less accurate. The root-mean-square errors of the real-time forecasts showed that the forecasts had skill out to two days. Mean one-day forecast temperature RMS error was 0.26 degrees C less than persistence RMS error. Mean two-day forecast temperature RMS error was 0.13 degrees C less than persistence RMS error. Mean one- or two-day salinity RMS error was 0.036 PSU less than persistence RMS error. The real-time skill in the surface was found to be greater than the skill at depth. Pattern correlation coefficient comparisons showed, on average, greater skill than the RMS errors. For simulations lasting 10 or more days, uncertainties in the boundaries could lead to errors in the Monterey Bay region. Following the real-time experiment, a reanalysis was performed in which improvements were made in the selection of model parameters and in the open-boundary conditions. The result of the reanalysis was improved long-term stability of the simulations and improved quantitative skill, especially the skill in the main thermocline (RMS simulation error 1 degrees C less than persistence RMS error out to five days). This allowed for an improved description of the ocean features. During the experiment there were two-week to 10-day long upwelling events. Two types of upwelling events were observed: one with plumes extending westward at point Ano Nuevo (AN) and Point Sur (PS); the other with a thinner band of upwelled water parallel to the coast and across Monterey Bay. During strong upwelling events the flows in the upper 10-20 m had scales similar to atmospheric scales. During relaxation, kinetic energy becomes available and leads to the development of mesoscale features. At 100-300 m depths, broad northward flows were observed, sometimes with a coastal branch following topographic features. An anticyclone was often observed in the subsurface fields in the mouth of Monterey Bay. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.7
|