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  • 1. Akselsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Olsson, Jonas
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Belyazid, Salim
    Capell, Réne
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Can increased weathering rates due to future warming compensate for base cation losses following whole-tree harvesting in spruce forests?2016In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 128, no 1-2, p. 89-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Andersen, Jesper H.
    et al.
    Axe, Philip
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Backer, Hermanni
    Carstensen, Jacob
    Claussen, Ulrich
    Fleming-Lehtinen, Vivi
    Jarvinen, Marko
    Kaartokallio, Hermanni
    Knuuttila, Seppo
    Korpinen, Samuli
    Kubiliute, Aiste
    Laamanen, Maria
    Lysiak-Pastuszak, Elzbieta
    Martin, Georg
    Murray, Ciaran
    Mohlenberg, Flemming
    Nausch, Guenther
    Norkko, Alf
    Villnas, Anna
    Getting the measure of eutrophication in the Baltic Sea: towards improved assessment principles and methods2011In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 137-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eutrophication status of the entire Baltic Sea is classified using a multi-metric indicator-based assessment tool. A total of 189 areas are assessed using indicators where information on reference conditions (RefCon), and acceptable deviation (AcDev) from reference condition could be combined with national monitoring data from the period 2001-2006. Most areas (176) are classified as 'affected by eutrophication' and only two open water areas and 11 coastal areas are classified as 'unaffected by eutrophication'. The classification is made by application of the recently developed HELCOM Eutrophication Assessment Tool (HEAT), which is described in this paper. The use of harmonized assessment principles and the HEAT tool allows for direct comparisons between different parts of the Baltic Sea despite variations in monitoring activities. The impaired status of 176 areas is directly related to nutrient enrichment and elevated loads from upstream catchments. Baltic Sea States have implemented nutrient management strategies since years which have reduced nutrient inputs. However, eutrophication is still a major problem for large parts of the Baltic Sea. The 2007 Baltic Sea Action Plan is projected to further reduce nutrient inputs aiming for a Baltic Sea unaffected by eutrophication by 2021.

  • 3. Sponseller, Ryan A.
    et al.
    Temnerud, Johan
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Patterns and drivers of riverine nitrogen (N) across alpine, subarctic, and boreal Sweden2014In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 120, no 1-3, p. 105-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concentrations of nitrogen (N) in surface waters reflect the export of different organic and inorganic forms from terrestrial environments and the modification of these resources within aquatic habitats. We evaluated the relative influence of terrestrial ecosystem state factors, anthropogenic gradients, and aquatic habitat variables on patterns of N concentration in streams and rivers across Sweden. We analyzed data from 115 national monitoring stations distributed along a 1,300 km latitudinal gradient, draining catchments that differed by more than 10 A degrees C in mean annual temperature (MAT), and more than five orders of magnitude in area. Regional trends in total organic nitrogen (TON) and carbon:nitrogen (C:N) were closely linked to broad-scale gradients in state factors (e.g., MAT), reflecting the importance of long-term ecosystem development on terrestrial organic matter accrual and export. In contrast, trends in nitrate (NO3 (-)), the dominant form of inorganic N, were largely unrelated to state factors, but instead were closely connected to gradients related to anthropogenic inputs (e.g., agricultural cover). Despite large differences in drainage size and cover by lakes and wetlands among sites, these descriptors of the aquatic environment had little influence on spatial patterns of N chemistry. The temporal variability in N concentrations also differed between forms: inorganic N was strongly seasonal, with peaks during dormant periods that underscore biotic control over terrestrial losses of limiting resources. Organic N showed comparatively weaker seasonality, but summertime increases suggest temperature-driven patterns of soil TON production and export-temporal signals which were modified by variables that govern water residence time within catchments. Unique combinations of regional predictors reflect basic differences in the cycling of organic versus inorganic N and highlight variation in the sensitivity of these different N forms to environmental changes that directly alter inputs of resources, or indirectly modify terrestrial ecosystems through shifts in species composition, rates of forest productivity, soil development, and hydrologic routing.

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