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  • 1. Bellucci, A.
    et al.
    Haarsma, R.
    Bellouin, N.
    Booth, B.
    Cagnazzo, C.
    van den Hurk, B.
    Keenlyside, N.
    Koenigk, Torben
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Massonnet, F.
    Materia, S.
    Weiss, M.
    Advancements in decadal climate predictability: The role of nonoceanic drivers2015In: Reviews of geophysics, ISSN 8755-1209, E-ISSN 1944-9208, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 165-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review recent progress in understanding the role of sea ice, land surface, stratosphere, and aerosols in decadal-scale predictability and discuss the perspectives for improving the predictive capabilities of current Earth system models (ESMs). These constituents have received relatively little attention because their contribution to the slow climatic manifold is controversial in comparison to that of the large heat capacity of the oceans. Furthermore, their initialization as well as their representation in state-of-the-art climate models remains a challenge. Numerous extraoceanic processes that could be active over the decadal range are proposed. Potential predictability associated with the aforementioned, poorly represented, and scarcely observed constituents of the climate system has been primarily inspected through numerical simulations performed under idealized experimental settings. The impact, however, on practical decadal predictions, conducted with realistically initialized full-fledged climate models, is still largely unexploited. Enhancing initial-value predictability through an improved model initialization appears to be a viable option for land surface, sea ice, and, marginally, the stratosphere. Similarly, capturing future aerosol emission storylines might lead to an improved representation of both global and regional short-term climatic changes. In addition to these factors, a key role on the overall predictive ability of ESMs is expected to be played by an accurate representation of processes associated with specific components of the climate system. These act as signal carriers, transferring across the climatic phase space the information associated with the initial state and boundary forcings, and dynamically bridging different (otherwise unconnected) subsystems. Through this mechanism, Earth system components trigger low-frequency variability modes, thus extending the predictability beyond the seasonal scale.

  • 2. Westra, S.
    et al.
    Fowler, H. J.
    Evans, J. P.
    Alexander, L. V.
    Berg, Peter
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Johnson, F.
    Kendon, E. J.
    Lenderink, G.
    Roberts, N. M.
    Future changes to the intensity and frequency of short-duration extreme rainfall2014In: Reviews of geophysics, ISSN 8755-1209, E-ISSN 1944-9208, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 522-555Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence that extreme rainfall intensity is increasing at the global scale has strengthened considerably in recent years. Research now indicates that the greatest increases are likely to occur in short-duration storms lasting less than a day, potentially leading to an increase in the magnitude and frequency of flash floods. This review examines the evidence for subdaily extreme rainfall intensification due to anthropogenic climate change and describes our current physical understanding of the association between subdaily extreme rainfall intensity and atmospheric temperature. We also examine the nature, quality, and quantity of information needed to allow society to adapt successfully to predicted future changes, and discuss the roles of observational and modeling studies in helping us to better understand the physical processes that can influence subdaily extreme rainfall characteristics. We conclude by describing the types of research required to produce a more thorough understanding of the relationships between local-scale thermodynamic effects, large-scale atmospheric circulation, and subdaily extreme rainfall intensity.

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