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  • 1. Bailey, Helen
    et al.
    Fossette, Sabrina
    Bograd, Steven J.
    Shillinger, George L.
    Swithenbank, Alan M.
    Georges, Jean-Yves
    Gaspar, Philippe
    Strömberg, Patrik
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Paladino, Frank V.
    Spotila, James R.
    Block, Barbara A.
    Hays, Graeme C.
    Movement Patterns for a Critically Endangered Species, the Leatherback Turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), Linked to Foraging Success and Population Status2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 5, article id e36401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foraging success for pelagic vertebrates may be revealed by horizontal and vertical movement patterns. We show markedly different patterns for leatherback turtles in the North Atlantic versus Eastern Pacific, which feed on gelatinous zooplankton that are only occasionally found in high densities. In the Atlantic, travel speed was characterized by two modes, indicative of high foraging success at low speeds (<15 km d(-1)) and transit at high speeds (20-45 km d(-1)). Only a single mode was evident in the Pacific, which occurred at speeds of 21 km d(-1) indicative of transit. The mean dive depth was more variable in relation to latitude but closer to the mean annual depth of the thermocline and nutricline for North Atlantic than Eastern Pacific turtles. The most parsimonious explanation for these findings is that Eastern Pacific turtles rarely achieve high foraging success. This is the first support for foraging behaviour differences between populations of this critically endangered species and suggests that longer periods searching for prey may be hindering population recovery in the Pacific while aiding population maintenance in the Atlantic.

  • 2. Bartolino, Valerio
    et al.
    Tian, Huidong
    Bergstrom, Ulf
    Jounela, Pekka
    Aro, Eero
    Dieterich, Christian
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Cardinale, Massimiliano
    Bland, Barbara
    Casini, Michele
    Spatio-temporal dynamics of a fish predator: Density-dependent and hydrographic effects on Baltic Sea cod population2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e0172004Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Bjorkman, Christer
    et al.
    Kindvall, Oskar
    Hoglund, Solveig
    Lilja, Anna
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Bärring, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Eklund, Karin
    High Temperature Triggers Latent Variation among Individuals: Oviposition Rate and Probability for Outbreaks2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 1, article id e16590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is anticipated that extreme population events, such as extinctions and outbreaks, will become more frequent as a consequence of climate change. To evaluate the increased probability of such events, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms involved. Variation between individuals in their response to climatic factors is an important consideration, especially if microevolution is expected to change the composition of populations. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we present data of a willow leaf beetle species, showing high variation among individuals in oviposition rate at a high temperature (20 degrees C). It is particularly noteworthy that not all individuals responded to changes in temperature; individuals laying few eggs at 20 degrees C continued to do so when transferred to 12 degrees C, whereas individuals that laid many eggs at 20 degrees C reduced their oviposition and laid the same number of eggs as the others when transferred to 12 degrees C. When transferred back to 20 degrees C most individuals reverted to their original oviposition rate. Thus, high variation among individuals was only observed at the higher temperature. Using a simple population model and based on regional climate change scenarios we show that the probability of outbreaks increases if there is a realistic increase in the number of warm summers. The probability of outbreaks also increased with increasing heritability of the ability to respond to increased temperature. Conclusions/Significance: If climate becomes warmer and there is latent variation among individuals in their temperature response, the probability for outbreaks may increase. However, the likelihood for microevolution to play a role may be low. This conclusion is based on the fact that it has been difficult to show that microevolution affect the probability for extinctions. Our results highlight the urge for cautiousness when predicting the future concerning probabilities for extreme population events.

  • 4. Oudin, Anna
    et al.
    Segersson, David
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Association between air pollution from residential wood burning and dementia incidence in a longitudinal study in Northern Sweden2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e0198283Article in journal (Refereed)
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