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Comparison and uncertainty of aerosol optical depth estimates derived from spectral and broadband measurements
SMHI, Core Services.
SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
2003 (English)In: Journal of applied meteorology (1988), ISSN 0894-8763, E-ISSN 1520-0450, Vol. 42, no 11, 1598-1610 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An experimental comparison of spectral aerosol optical depth tau(a,lambda) derived from measurements by two spectral radiometers [a LI-COR, Inc., LI-1800 spectroradiometer and a Centre Suisse d'Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) SPM2000 sun photometer] and a broadband field pyrheliometer has been made. The study was limited to three wavelengths ( 368, 500, and 778 nm), using operational calibration and optical depth calculation procedures. For measurements taken on 32 days spread over 1 yr, the rms difference in tau(a,lambda) derived from the two spectral radiometers was less than 0.01 at 500 and 778 nm. For wavelengths shorter than 500 nm and longer than 950 nm, the performance of the LI-1800 in its current configuration did not permit accurate determinations of tau(a,lambda). Estimates of spectral aerosol optical depth from broadband pyrheliometer measurements using two models of the Angstromngstrom turbidity coefficient were examined. For the broadband method that was closest to the sun photometer results, the mean (rms) differences in tau(a,lambda) were 0.014 (0.028), 0.014 (0.019), and 0.013 ( 0.014) at 368, 500, and 778 nm. The mean differences are just above the average uncertainties of the sun photometer tau(a,lambda) values (0.012, 0.011, and 0.011) for the same wavelengths, as determined through a detailed uncertainty analysis. The amount of atmospheric water vapor is a necessary input to the broadband methods. If upper-air sounding data are not available, water vapor from a meteorological forecast model yields significantly better turbidity results than does using estimates from surface measurements of air temperature and relative humidity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 42, no 11, 1598-1610 p.
National Category
Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
Research subject
Remote sensing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-1337DOI: 10.1175/1520-0450(2003)042<1598:CAUOAO>2.0.CO;2ISI: 000186426600005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:smhi-1337DiVA: diva2:846429
Available from: 2015-08-17 Created: 2015-07-29 Last updated: 2017-05-12Bibliographically approved

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Carlund, ThomasLandelius, TomasJosefsson, Weine

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