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Modelling of near-surface ozone over South Asia
SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
2008 (English)In: Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, ISSN 0167-7764, E-ISSN 1573-0662, Vol. 59, no 1, 61-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hourly, three-dimensional, fields of tropospheric ozone have been produced for 12 consecutive months on a domain covering South Asia, using the regional Eulerian off-line chemistry transport model MATCH. The results were compared with background observations to investigate diurnal and seasonal variations of near-surface ozone in the region. MATCH reproduced the seasonality of near-surface ozone at most locations in the area. However, the current, and previous, studies indicate that the model consequently overestimate night-time concentrations, while it occasionally underestimates the day-time, near-surface, ozone concentrations. The lowest monthly-mean concentrations of near-surface ozone are typically experienced in June-September, coincident with the rainy season in most areas. The seasonality is not identical across the domain; some locations have a completely different trend. Large areas in Northern India and Nepal show a secondary minimum during the cold winter season (December-January). High concentrations of near-surface ozone are found over the oceans, close to the Indian subcontinent, due to the less efficient dry deposition to water surfaces; over parts of Tibet due to influence of free tropospheric air and little deposition to snow covered surfaces; and along the Gangetic valley due to the large emissions of precursors in this region. Monthly-mean ozone concentrations in the densely populated northern India range from 30-45 ppb(v). The model results were also used to produce maps of AOT40. The results point towards similar levels of AOT40 in India as in Europe: large areas of India show 3-month AOT40 values above 3 ppm(v) hours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 59, no 1, 61-80 p.
Keyword [en]
AOT40, crop yield, India, MATCH, modelling, ozone
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environment
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-1131DOI: 10.1007/s10874-008-9096-zISI: 000254090200004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:smhi-1131DiVA: diva2:813773
Available from: 2015-05-25 Created: 2015-05-25 Last updated: 2015-05-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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