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Surface Ozone in the Marine Environment-Horizontal Ozone Concentration Gradients in Coastal Areas
SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
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2013 (English)In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 224, no 7, 1603Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spring/summer surface ozone concentrations, [O-3], in coastal environments were investigated: (1) by comparison of coastal and inland monitoring stations with data from a small island >5 km off the coast of southwest Sweden, (2) as a gradient from the coast towards inland in southernmost Sweden. Further, results from the chemical transport model MATCH were used to assess the marine influence on [O-3]. It was hypothesised that [O-3] is higher on the small island compared to the coast, especially during night and in offshore wind. Another hypothesis was that [O-3] declines from the coast towards inland. Our hypotheses were based on observations that the deposition velocity of O-3 to sea surfaces is lower than to terrestrial surfaces, and that vertical air mixing is stronger in the marine environment, especially during night. The island experienced 10 % higher [O-3] compared to the coast. This difference was larger with offshore (15 %) than onshore wind (9 %). The concentration difference between island and coast was larger during night, but prevailed during day and could not be explained by differences in [NO2] between the sites. The difference in [O-3] between the island and the inland site was 20 %. Higher [O-3] over the sea, especially during night, was reproduced by MATCH. In the gradient study, [O-3] declined from the coast towards inland. Both [O-3] and [NO2] were elevated at the coast, indicating that the gradient in [O-3] from the coast was not caused by NO titration. The conclusions were that surface [O-3] in marine environments is higher than in coastal, and higher in coastal than inland areas, especially during night.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 224, no 7, 1603
Keyword [en]
Ozone, Wind direction, Coast, Marine boundary layer, Terrestrial boundary layer, Nitrogen dioxide
National Category
Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
Research subject
Environment
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-366DOI: 10.1007/s11270-013-1603-4ISI: 000321666500006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:smhi-366DiVA: diva2:801810
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-03-31 Last updated: 2015-04-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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