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Jansson, Christer
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Zhang, W., Doescher, R., Koenigk, T., Miller, P. A., Jansson, C., Samuelsson, P., . . . Smith, B. (2020). The Interplay of Recent Vegetation and Sea Ice Dynamics-Results From a Regional Earth System Model Over the Arctic. Geophysical Research Letters, 47(6), Article ID e2019GL085982.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Interplay of Recent Vegetation and Sea Ice Dynamics-Results From a Regional Earth System Model Over the Arctic
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2020 (English)In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 47, no 6, article id e2019GL085982Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent accelerated warming over the Arctic coincides with sea ice reduction and shifting patterns of land cover. We use a state-of-the-art regional Earth system model, RCAO-GUESS, which comprises a dynamic vegetation model (LPJ-GUESS), a regional atmosphere model (RCA), and an ocean sea ice model (RCO), to explore the dynamic coupling between vegetation and sea ice during 1989-2011. Our results show that RCAO-GUESS captures recent trends in observed sea ice concentration and extent, with the inclusion of vegetation dynamics resulting in larger, more realistic variations in summer and autumn than the model that does not account for vegetation dynamics. Vegetation feedbacks induce concomitant changes in downwelling longwave radiation, near-surface temperature, mean sea level pressure, and sea ice reductions, suggesting a feedback chain linking vegetation change to sea ice dynamics. This study highlights the importance of including interactive vegetation dynamics in modeling the Arctic climate system, particularly when predicting sea ice dynamics. Plain Language Summary Recent accelerated warming over the Arctic is associated with dramatic changes in the physical environment, among which unprecedented sea ice decline has received particular attention. In this study, we use a regional Earth system model accounting for interactive coupling between the atmosphere, land vegetation, and sea ice dynamics to explore their potential links. Our model simulates observed spatiotemporal patterns of sea ice thickness and extent reasonably well. Furthermore, the results show that feedbacks of warming-driven vegetation changes on the near-surface radiation balance can cause greater variations in sea ice between seasons, which can contribute to an accelerated trend of sea ice reduction. The changes in mean sea level pressure caused by vegetation changes can alter the transport of energy and warm the land, sea, and sea ice surfaces. Downwelling longwave radiation is the dominant factor contributing to the near-surface warming and increased sea ice melting. Our study highlights the importance of adopting fully coupled Earth system models that account for interactive effects of vegetation dynamics on the physical climate system, in particular when analyzing the reduction of sea ice in the Arctic.

National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Climate; Climate
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-5680 (URN)10.1029/2019GL085982 (DOI)000529097700017 ()
Available from: 2020-05-13 Created: 2020-05-13 Last updated: 2020-05-13Bibliographically approved
Roth, M., Jansson, C. & Velasco, E. (2017). Multi-year energy balance and carbon dioxide fluxes over a residential neighbourhood in a tropical city. Paper presented at 4th JCOMM Workshop on Advances in Marine Climatology (CLIMAR), JUN 09-12, 2014, Asheville, NC. International Journal of Climatology, 37(5), 2679-2698
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-year energy balance and carbon dioxide fluxes over a residential neighbourhood in a tropical city
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Climatology, ISSN 0899-8418, E-ISSN 1097-0088, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 2679-2698Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Climate
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-4156 (URN)10.1002/joc.4873 (DOI)000398859700036 ()
Conference
4th JCOMM Workshop on Advances in Marine Climatology (CLIMAR), JUN 09-12, 2014, Asheville, NC
Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2020-04-14Bibliographically approved
Wu, M., Schurgers, G., Rummukainen, M., Smith, B., Samuelsson, P., Jansson, C., . . . May, W. (2016). Vegetation-climate feedbacks modulate rainfall patterns in Africa under future climate change. Earth System Dynamics, 7(3), 627-647
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vegetation-climate feedbacks modulate rainfall patterns in Africa under future climate change
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2016 (English)In: Earth System Dynamics, ISSN 2190-4979, E-ISSN 2190-4987, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 627-647Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Climate
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-3257 (URN)10.5194/esd-7-627-2016 (DOI)000382829300001 ()
Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-04 Last updated: 2020-05-04Bibliographically approved
Zhang, W., Jansson, C., Miller, P. A., Smith, B. & Samuelsson, P. (2014). Biogeophysical feedbacks enhance the Arctic terrestrial carbon sink in regional Earth system dynamics. Biogeosciences, 11(19), 5503-5519
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biogeophysical feedbacks enhance the Arctic terrestrial carbon sink in regional Earth system dynamics
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2014 (English)In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 11, no 19, p. 5503-5519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Continued warming of the Arctic will likely accelerate terrestrial carbon (C) cycling by increasing both uptake and release of C. Yet, there are still large uncertainties in modelling Arctic terrestrial ecosystems as a source or sink of C. Most modelling studies assessing or projecting the future fate of C exchange with the atmosphere are based on either stand-alone process-based models or coupled climate-C cycle general circulation models, and often disregard biogeophysical feedbacks of land-surface changes to the atmosphere. To understand how biogeophysical feedbacks might impact on both climate and the C budget in Arctic terrestrial ecosystems, we apply the regional Earth system model RCA-GUESS over the CORDEX-Arctic domain. The model is forced with lateral boundary conditions from an EC-Earth CMIP5 climate projection under the representative concentration pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario. We perform two simulations, with or without interactive vegetation dynamics respectively, to assess the impacts of biogeophysical feedbacks. Both simulations indicate that Arctic terrestrial ecosystems will continue to sequester C with an increased uptake rate until the 2060-2070s, after which the C budget will return to a weak C sink as increased soil respiration and biomass burning outpaces increased net primary productivity. The additional C sinks arising from biogeophysical feedbacks are approximately 8.5 Gt C, accounting for 22% of the total C sinks, of which 83.5% are located in areas of extant Arctic tundra. Two opposing feedback mechanisms, mediated by albedo and evapotranspiration changes respectively, contribute to this response. The albedo feedback dominates in the winter and spring seasons, amplifying the near-surface warming by up to 1.35 degrees C in spring, while the evapotranspiration feedback dominates in the summer months, and leads to a cooling of up to 0.81 degrees C. Such feedbacks stimulate vegetation growth due to an earlier onset of the growing season, leading to compositional changes in woody plants and vegetation redistribution.

National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Climate
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-138 (URN)10.5194/bg-11-5503-2014 (DOI)000344153200015 ()
Available from: 2015-04-09 Created: 2015-03-26 Last updated: 2020-05-04Bibliographically approved
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