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Capell, Réne
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Pugliese, A., Persiano, S., Bagli, S., Mazzoli, P., Parajka, J., Arheimer, B., . . . Castellarin, A. (2018). A geostatistical data-assimilation technique for enhancing macro-scale rainfall-runoff simulations. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 22(9), 4633-4648
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A geostatistical data-assimilation technique for enhancing macro-scale rainfall-runoff simulations
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2018 (English)In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 4633-4648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-4964 (URN)10.5194/hess-22-4633-2018 (DOI)000443878800001 ()
Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Nijzink, R., Almeida, S., Pechlivanidis, I., Capell, R., Gustafsson, D., Arheimer, B., . . . Hrachowitz, M. (2018). Constraining Conceptual Hydrological ModelsWith Multiple Information Sources. Water resources research, 54(10), 8332-8362
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constraining Conceptual Hydrological ModelsWith Multiple Information Sources
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2018 (English)In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 8332-8362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The calibration of hydrological models without streamflow observations is problematic, and the simultaneous, combined use of remotely sensed products for this purpose has not been exhaustively tested thus far. Our hypothesis is that the combined use of products can (1) reduce the parameter search space and (2) improve the representation of internal model dynamics and hydrological signatures. Five different conceptual hydrological models were applied to 27 catchments across Europe. A parameter selection process, similar to a likelihood weighting procedure, was applied for 1,023 possible combinations of 10 different data sources, ranging from using 1 to all 10 of these products. Distances between the two empirical distributions of model performance metrics with and without using a specific product were determined to assess the added value of a specific product. In a similar way, the performance of the models to reproduce 27 hydrological signatures was evaluated relative to the unconstrained model. Significant reductions in the parameter space were obtained when combinations included Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer ‐ Earth Observing System and Advanced Scatterometer soil moisture, Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment total water storage anomalies, and, in snow‐dominated catchments, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer snow cover products. The evaporation products of Land Surface Analysis ‐ Satellite Application Facility and MOD16 were less effective for deriving meaningful, well‐constrained posterior parameter distributions. The hydrological signature analysis indicated that most models profited from constraining with an increasing number of data sources. Concluding, constraining models with multiple data sources simultaneously was shown to be valuable for at least four of the five hydrological models to determine model parameters in absence of streamflow.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-5011 (URN)10.1029/2017WR021895 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Akselsson, C., Olsson, J., Belyazid, S. & Capell, R. (2016). Can increased weathering rates due to future warming compensate for base cation losses following whole-tree harvesting in spruce forests?. Biogeochemistry, 128(1-2), 89-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can increased weathering rates due to future warming compensate for base cation losses following whole-tree harvesting in spruce forests?
2016 (English)In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 128, no 1-2, p. 89-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-2161 (URN)10.1007/s10533-016-0196-6 (DOI)000374557300006 ()
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Nijzink, R., Hutton, C., Pechlivanidis, I., Capell, R., Arheimer, B., Freer, J., . . . Hrachowitz, M. (2016). The evolution of root-zone moisture capacities after deforestation: a step towards hydrological predictions under change?. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 20(12), 4775-4799
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The evolution of root-zone moisture capacities after deforestation: a step towards hydrological predictions under change?
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2016 (English)In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 4775-4799Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The core component of many hydrological systems, the moisture storage capacity available to vegetation, is impossible to observe directly at the catchment scale and is typically treated as a calibration parameter or obtained from a priori available soil characteristics combined with estimates of rooting depth. Often this parameter is considered to remain constant in time. Using long-term data (30–40 years) from three experimental catchments that underwent significant land cover change, we tested the hypotheses that: (1) the root-zone storage capacity significantly changes after deforestation, (2) changes in the root-zone storage capacity can to a large extent explain post-treatment changes to the hydrological regimes and that (3) a time-dynamic formulation of the root-zone storage can improve the performance of a hydrological model.A recently introduced method to estimate catchment-scale root-zone storage capacities based on climate data (i.e. observed rainfall and an estimate of transpiration) was used to reproduce the temporal evolution of root-zone storage capacity under change. Briefly, the maximum deficit that arises from the difference between cumulative daily precipitation and transpiration can be considered as a proxy for root-zone storage capacity. This value was compared to the value obtained from four different conceptual hydrological models that were calibrated for consecutive 2-year windows.It was found that water-balance-derived root-zone storage capacities were similar to the values obtained from calibration of the hydrological models. A sharp decline in root-zone storage capacity was observed after deforestation, followed by a gradual recovery, for two of the three catchments. Trend analysis suggested hydrological recovery periods between 5 and 13 years after deforestation. In a proof-of-concept analysis, one of the hydrological models was adapted to allow dynamically changing root-zone storage capacities, following the observed changes due to deforestation. Although the overall performance of the modified model did not considerably change, in 51 % of all the evaluated hydrological signatures, considering all three catchments, improvements were observed when adding a time-variant representation of the root-zone storage to the model.In summary, it is shown that root-zone moisture storage capacities can be highly affected by deforestation and climatic influences and that a simple method exclusively based on climate data can not only provide robust, catchment-scale estimates of this critical parameter, but also reflect its time-dynamic behaviour after deforestation.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-3817 (URN)10.5194/hess-20-4775-2016 (DOI)000389215600001 ()
Available from: 2017-01-10 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
van Vliet, M. T. H., Donnelly, C., Strombäck, L., Capell, R. & Ludwig, F. (2015). European scale climate information services for water use sectors. Journal of Hydrology, 528, 503-513
Open this publication in new window or tab >>European scale climate information services for water use sectors
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 528, p. 503-513Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study demonstrates a climate information service for pan-European water use sectors that are vulnerable to climate change induced hydrological changes, including risk and safety (disaster preparedness), agriculture, energy (hydropower and cooling water use for thermoelectric power) and environment (water quality). To study the climate change impacts we used two different hydrological models forced with an ensemble of bias-corrected general circulation model (GCM) output for both the lowest (2.6) and highest (8.5) representative concentration pathways (RCP). Selected indicators of water related vulnerability for each sector were then calculated from the hydrological model results. Our results show a distinct north-south divide in terms of climate change impacts; in the south the water availability will reduce while in the north water availability will increase. Across different climate models precipitation and streamflow increase in northern Europe and decrease in southern Europe, but the latitude at which this change occurs varies depending on the GCM. Hydrological extremes are increasing over large parts of Europe. The agricultural sector will be affected by reduced water availability (in the south) and increased drought. Both streamflow and soil moistures droughts are projected to increase in most parts of Europe except in northern Scandinavia and the Alps. The energy sector will be affected by lower hydropower potential in most European countries and reduced cooling water availability due to higher water temperatures and reduced summer river flows. Our results show that in particular in the Mediterranean the pressures are high because of increasing drought which will have large impacts on both the agriculture and energy sectors. In France and Italy this is combined with increased flood hazards. Our results show important impacts of climate change on European water use sectors indicating a clear need for adaptation. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-1961 (URN)10.1016/j.jhydrol.2015.06.060 (DOI)000358968200041 ()
Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-03-03 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Ceola, S., Arheimer, B., Baratti, E., Bloeschl, G., Capell, R., Castellarin, A., . . . Wagener, T. (2015). Virtual laboratories: new opportunities for collaborative water science. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 19(4), 2101-2117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual laboratories: new opportunities for collaborative water science
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2015 (English)In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 2101-2117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reproducibility and repeatability of experiments are the fundamental prerequisites that allow researchers to validate results and share hydrological knowledge, experience and expertise in the light of global water management problems. Virtual laboratories offer new opportunities to enable these prerequisites since they allow experimenters to share data, tools and pre-defined experimental procedures (i.e. protocols). Here we present the outcomes of a first collaborative numerical experiment undertaken by five different international research groups in a virtual laboratory to address the key issues of reproducibility and repeatability. Moving from the definition of accurate and detailed experimental protocols, a rainfall-runoff model was independently applied to 15 European catchments by the research groups and model results were collectively examined through a web-based discussion. We found that a detailed modelling protocol was crucial to ensure the comparability and reproducibility of the proposed experiment across groups. Our results suggest that sharing comprehensive and precise protocols and running the experiments within a controlled environment (e.g. virtual laboratory) is as fundamental as sharing data and tools for ensuring experiment repeatability and reproducibility across the broad scientific community and thus advancing hydrology in a more coherent way.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-1987 (URN)10.5194/hess-19-2101-2015 (DOI)000353877000029 ()
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-03-03 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
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