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Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Hankin, B., Strömqvist, J., Burgess, C., Pers, C., Bielby, S., Revilla-Romero, B. & Pope, L. (2019). A New National Water Quality Model to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Catchment Management Measures in England. Water, 11(8), Article ID 1612.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New National Water Quality Model to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Catchment Management Measures in England
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2019 (English)In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 1612Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This investigation reports on a new national model to evaluate the effectiveness of catchment sensitive farming in England, and how pollution mitigation measures have improved water quality between 2006 and 2016. An adapted HYPE (HYdrological Predictions for the Environment) model was written to use accurate farm emissions data so that the pathway impact could be accounted for in the land phase of transport. Farm emissions were apportioned into different runoff fractions simulated in surface and soil layers, and travel time and losses were taken into account. These were derived from the regulator's catchment change matrix' and converted to monthly load time series, combined with extensive point source load datasets. Very large flow and water quality monitoring datasets were used to calibrate the model nationally for flow, nitrogen, phosphorus, suspended sediments and faecal indicator organisms. The model was simulated with and without estimated changes to farm emissions resulting from catchment measures, and spatial and temporal changes to water quality concentrations were then assessed.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-5448 (URN)10.3390/w11081612 (DOI)000484561500086 ()
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved
Strombäck, L., Pers, C., Strömqvist, J., Lindström, G. & Gustavsson, J. (2019). A web based analysis and scenario tool for eutrophication of inland waters for Sweden and Europe. Environmental Modelling & Software, 111, 259-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A web based analysis and scenario tool for eutrophication of inland waters for Sweden and Europe
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Modelling & Software, ISSN 1364-8152, E-ISSN 1873-6726, Vol. 111, p. 259-267Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-5017 (URN)10.1016/j.envsoft.2018.07.012 (DOI)000451631300020 ()
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Lewerin, S. S., Sokolova, E., Wahlstrom, H., Lindström, G., Pers, C., Strömqvist, J. & Soren, K. (2019). Potential infection of grazing cattle via contaminated water: a theoretical modelling approach. Animal, 13(9), 2052-2059, Article ID PII S1751731118003415.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Potential infection of grazing cattle via contaminated water: a theoretical modelling approach
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2019 (English)In: Animal, ISSN 1751-7311, E-ISSN 1751-732X, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 2052-2059, article id PII S1751731118003415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wastewater discharge and agricultural activities may pose microbial risks to natural water sources. The impact of different sources can be assessed by water quality modelling. The aim of this study was to use hydrological and hydrodynamic models to illustrate the risk of exposing grazing animals to faecal pollutants in natural water sources, using three zoonotic faecal pathogens as model microbes and fictitious pastures in Sweden as examples. Microbial contamination by manure from fertilisation and grazing was modelled by use of a hydrological model (HYPE) and a hydrodynamic model (MIKE 3 FM), and microbial contamination from human wastewater was modelled by application of both models in a backwards process. The faecal pathogens Salmonella spp., verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (VTEC) and Cryptosporidium parvum were chosen as model organisms. The pathogen loads on arable land and pastures were estimated based on pathogen concentration in cattle faeces, herd prevalence and within-herd prevalence. Contamination from human wastewater discharge was simulated by estimating the number of pathogens required from a fictitious wastewater discharge to reach a concentration high enough to cause infection in cattle using the points on the fictitious pastures as their primary source of drinking water. In the scenarios for pathogens from animal sources, none of the simulated concentrations of salmonella exceeded the concentrations needed to infect adult cattle. For VTEC, most of the simulated concentrations exceeded the concentration needed to infect calves. For C. parvum, all the simulated concentrations exceeded the concentration needed to infect calves. The pathogen loads needed at the release points for human wastewater to achieve infectious doses for cattle were mostly above the potential loads of salmonella and VTEC estimated to be present in a 24-h overflow from a medium-size Swedish wastewater treatment plant, while the required pathogen loads of C. parvum at the release points were below the potential loads of C. parvum in a 24-h wastewater overflow. Most estimates in this study assume a worst-case scenario. Controlling zoonotic infections at herd level prevents environmental contamination and subsequent human exposure. The potential for infection of grazing animals with faecal pathogens has implications for keeping animals on pastures with access to natural water sources. As the infectious dose for most pathogens is more easily reached for calves than for adult animals, and young calves are also the main shedders of C. parvum, keeping young calves on pastures adjacent to natural water sources is best avoided.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-5443 (URN)10.1017/S1751731118003415 (DOI)000483552100033 ()30614435 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved
Olsson, J., Pers, C., Bengtsson, L., Pechlivanidis, I., Berg, P. & Körnich, H. (2017). Distance-dependent depth-duration analysis in high-resolution hydro-meteorological ensemble forecasting: A case study in Malmo City, Sweden. Environmental Modelling & Software, 93, 381-397
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distance-dependent depth-duration analysis in high-resolution hydro-meteorological ensemble forecasting: A case study in Malmo City, Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Environmental Modelling & Software, ISSN 1364-8152, E-ISSN 1873-6726, Vol. 93, p. 381-397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-4135 (URN)10.1016/j.envsoft.2017.03.025 (DOI)000403512500026 ()
Available from: 2017-08-08 Created: 2017-08-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Yin, Y., Jiang, S., Pers, C., Yang, X., Liu, Q., Yuan, J., . . . Zheng, Z. (2016). Assessment of the Spatial and Temporal Variations of Water Quality for Agricultural Lands with Crop Rotation in China by Using a HYPE Model. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of the Spatial and Temporal Variations of Water Quality for Agricultural Lands with Crop Rotation in China by Using a HYPE Model
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 13, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many water quality models have been successfully used worldwide to predict nutrient losses from anthropogenically impacted catchments, but hydrological and nutrient simulations with limited data are difficult considering the transfer of model parameters and complication of model calibration and validation. This study aims: (i) to assess the performance capabilities of a new and relatively more advantageous model, namely, Hydrological Predictions for the Environment (HYPE), that simulates stream flow and nutrient load in agricultural areas by using a multi-site and multi-objective parameter calibration method and (ii) to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP) concentrations and loads with crop rotation by using the model for the first time. A parameter estimation tool (PEST) was used to calibrate parameters. Results show that the parameters related to the effective soil porosity were highly sensitive to hydrological modeling. N balance was largely controlled by soil denitrification processes. P balance was influenced by the sedimentation rate and production/decay of P in rivers and lakes. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variations of discharge and TN/TP relatively well in both calibration (2006-2008) and validation (2009-2010) periods. Among the obtained data, the lowest Nash-Suttclife efficiency of discharge, daily TN load, and daily TP load were 0.74, 0.51, and 0.54, respectively. The seasonal variations of daily TN concentrations in the entire simulation period were insufficient, indicated that crop rotation changed the timing and amount of N output. Monthly TN and TP simulation yields revealed that nutrient outputs were abundant in summer in terms of the corresponding discharge. The area-weighted TN and TP load annual yields in five years showed that nutrient loads were extremely high along Hong and Ru rivers, especially in agricultural lands.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-2023 (URN)10.3390/ijerph13030336 (DOI)000373528600001 ()
Available from: 2016-05-04 Created: 2016-05-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Arheimer, B. & Pers, C. (2016). Lessons learned? Effects of nutrient reductions from constructing wetlands in 1996–2006 across Sweden. Ecological Engineering: The Journal of Ecotechnology, 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lessons learned? Effects of nutrient reductions from constructing wetlands in 1996–2006 across Sweden
2016 (English)In: Ecological Engineering: The Journal of Ecotechnology, ISSN 0925-8574, E-ISSN 1872-6992, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-4051 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoleng.2016.01.088 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-04-24 Created: 2017-04-24 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Pers, C., Temnerud, J. & Lindström, G. (2016). Modelling water, nutrients, and organic carbon in forested catchments: a HYPE application. Hydrological Processes, 30(18), 3252-3273
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling water, nutrients, and organic carbon in forested catchments: a HYPE application
2016 (English)In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 30, no 18, p. 3252-3273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-3335 (URN)10.1002/hyp.10830 (DOI)000383466900011 ()
Available from: 2016-10-18 Created: 2016-10-18 Last updated: 2018-01-14Bibliographically approved
Winterdahl, M., Laudon, H., Lyon, S. W., Pers, C. & Bishop, K. (2016). Sensitivity of stream dissolved organic carbon to temperature and discharge: Implications of future climates. Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences, 121(1), 126-144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensitivity of stream dissolved organic carbon to temperature and discharge: Implications of future climates
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences, ISSN 2169-8953, E-ISSN 2169-8961, Vol. 121, no 1, p. 126-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a significant constituent in aquatic ecosystems with concentrations in streams influenced by both temperature and water flow pathway dynamics associated with changes in discharge (streamflow). We investigated the sensitivity of DOC concentrations in 12 high-latitude headwater streams to changes in temperature and discharge using a mathematical model. The implications of differences in sensitivities were explored by using downscaled projections of air temperature and discharge to simulate possible trajectories of DOC concentrations in a changing climate. We found two distinct responses: (i) catchments where stream DOC sensitivity was high to temperature but low to discharge and (ii) catchments where stream DOC sensitivity was low to temperature but high to discharge. Streams with strong seasonal DOC dynamics were more sensitive to temperature changes than nonseasonal systems. In addition, stream DOC sensitivity to discharge was strongly correlated with vertical soil water DOC differences in the near-stream zone. Simulations of possible future changes in DOC concentrations indicated median increases of about 4-24% compared to current levels when using projections of air temperature and discharge but even larger increases were observed for base flow concentrations (13-42%). Streams with high-temperature sensitivity showed the largest increases in DOC concentrations. Our results suggest that future climatic changes could bring significant increases in surface water DOC concentrations in boreal and hemiboreal areas but that the response ultimately is dependent on vertical soil solution DOC differences and soil organic carbon distribution.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-2049 (URN)10.1002/2015JG002922 (DOI)000370173100008 ()
Available from: 2016-05-02 Created: 2016-05-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Lindström, G., Pers, C., Rosberg, J., Strömqvist, J. & Arheimer, B. (2010). Development and testing of the HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) water quality model for different spatial scales. HYDROLOGY RESEARCH, 41(3-4), 295-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and testing of the HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) water quality model for different spatial scales
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2010 (English)In: HYDROLOGY RESEARCH, ISSN 1998-9563, Vol. 41, no 3-4, p. 295-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The HYPE model is a hydrological model for small-scale and large-scale assessments of water resources and water quality, developed at the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute during 2005-2007. In the model, the landscape is divided into classes according to soil type, land use and altitude. In agricultural lands the soil is divided into three layers, each with individual computations of soil wetness and nutrient processes. The model simulates water flow and transport and turnover of nitrogen and phosphorus. Nutrients follow the same pathways as water in the model: surface runoff, macropore flow, tile drainage and outflow from individual soil layers. Rivers and lakes are described separately with routines for turnover of nutrients in each environment. Model parameters are global, or coupled to soil type or land use. The model was evaluated both by local calibrations to internal variables from different test basins and to data on discharge and nutrients from a large number of small basins. In addition, the estimated parameters were transferred to two larger basins in southern Sweden: River Ronnea and River Vindan. The resulting simulations were generally in good agreement with observations.

Keywords
high resolution, hydrological model, modelling system, nutrients, scenarios, spatially distributed
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-593 (URN)10.2166/nh.2010.007 (DOI)000279499700011 ()
Available from: 2015-04-20 Created: 2015-04-20 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Pers, C. (2007). HBV-NP Model Manual. SMHI
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HBV-NP Model Manual
2007 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SMHI, 2007. p. 80
Series
Hydrology, ISSN 0283-7722 ; 103
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:smhi:diva-2748 (URN)Hydrologi, Rapporter, Serie Hydrologi (Local ID)Hydrologi, Rapporter, Serie Hydrologi (Archive number)Hydrologi, Rapporter, Serie Hydrologi (OAI)
Available from: 2007-09-18 Created: 2016-07-08 Last updated: 2016-07-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4563-2752

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