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  • Wesslander, Karin
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Coastal eutrophication status assessment using HEAT 1.0 (WFD methodology) versus HEAT 3.0 (MSFD methodology) and  Development of an oxygen consumption  indicator2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report contains two parts which are self standing reports and a contribution to the HELCOM project EUTRO-OPER. The work has been funded and commissioned by SwAM (Swedish agency for marine and water management) 2014-2015.

    • Coastal eutrophication status assessment using HEAT 1.0 (WFD methodology) versus HEAT 3.0 (MSFD methodology)

    Eutrophication status is assessed nationally in coastal waters within the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and in open sea areas within the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Both WFD and MSFD consider eutrophication but with different approaches and it is therefore a need for harmonisation in the assessment process.   The Excel based tool HEAT (HELCOM Eutrophication Assessment Tool) has been used in previous assessments in the HELCOM region. There are two versions of the tool; HEAT 1.0 and HEAT 3.0, the first is based on the WFD methodology and the second is based on the MSFD methodology. The main difference between HEAT 1.0 and HEAT 3.0 is how the indicators are grouped. Here we assess the eutrophication status in coastal waters by applying HEAT and compare the results with the national WFD assessments. The present test includes data on 33 selected coastal water bodies in five countries: Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Poland and Sweden. Data on reference condition, acceptable deviation, status and class boundaries of all indicators used in WFD for reporting ecological status (biological and physical-chemical) have been provided for each tested water body. The data has been inserted in the HEAT 1.0 and HEAT 3.0 tools and been compared with the national WFD assessments.   Both HEAT versions gave lower status in more than 50 % of the cases. For some tests the status changed to sub-GES from GES when HEAT is applied. The good/moderate boundary is the same in both HEAT and the WFD while the lower class boundaries in general are stricter in HEAT, which explains the lower status. In national WFD assessments expert judgment is used when there is little, no or very uncertain in situ data. The status in HEAT is given by the one-out-all-out principle but it is still possible to include expert judgment through the weighting factors.

    • Development of an oxygen consumption indicator

    It was investigated if the oxygen consumption can be used as an oxygen indicator for the Baltic Sea. The method is based on the idea of calculating the oxygen consumption in a stabile layer below the productive zone during summer and relating this to nutrient concentrations. With more nutrients available there is an increased biological production. By estimating how much oxygen is needed to mineralise the biological material it may be possible to link the oxygen consumption to eutrophication.

    The oxygen consumption was calculated for the BY15-Gotland Deep in the Eastern Gotland Basin. We identified a stabile layer between 30 and 50 m and a large change in both oxygen and nutrients from June to August. However, the oxygen consumption had a very high inter-annual variation and there were no significant correlation with the winter mean of nutrient concentrations. It was not possible to calculate the diffusion between the layers because of too sparse measurements at the stratification which limits the method. The calculation of the diffusion is however possible to improve with a model. Further on, the depth of the stabile layer is varying between areas and also between years.   We realised that the method has too many restrictions to be a functional indicator. A functional indicator shall not be dependent on heavy modelling or demand too much on expert judgement. We also investigated if a possible candidate to use as a more simple oxygen consumption indicator could be the use of oxygen saturation at a specific depth. If we assume that the temperature has not changed much since the establishment of stratification we may expect that changes in oxygen saturation observed in August at this depth would be caused by the biological oxygen consumption occurring during late spring and summer. The correlation with winter mean nutrients slightly improved in this case.

  • Liu, Ye
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Eilola, Kari
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Nutrient transports in the Baltic Sea - results from a 30-year physical-biogeochemical reanalysis2017In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 14, no 8, 2113-2131 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Napoly, Adrien
    et al.
    Boone, Aaron
    Samuelsson, Patrick
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Gollvik, Stefan
    SMHI.
    Martin, Eric
    Seferian, Roland
    Carrer, Dominique
    Decharme, Bertrand
    Jarlan, Lionel
    The interactions between soil-biosphere-atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model multi-energy balance (MEB) option in SURFEXv8-Part 2: Introduction of a litter formulation and model evaluation for local-scale forest sites2017In: Geoscientific Model Development, ISSN 1991-959X, E-ISSN 1991-9603, Vol. 10, no 4, 1621-1644 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Bennartz, Ralf
    et al.
    Hoschen, Heidrun
    Picard, Bruno
    Schroder, Marc
    Stengel, Martin
    Sus, Oliver
    Bojkov, Bojan
    Casadio, Stefano
    Diedrich, Hannes
    Eliasson, Salomon
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Fell, Frank
    Fischer, Jurgen
    Hollmann, Rainer
    Preusker, Rene
    Willén, Ulrika
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    An intercalibrated dataset of total column water vapour and wet tropospheric correction based on MWR on board ERS-1, ERS-2, and Envisat2017In: Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, ISSN 1867-1381, E-ISSN 1867-8548, Vol. 10, no 4, 1387-1402 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Martin, G. M.
    et al.
    Peyrille, P.
    Roehrig, R.
    Rio, C.
    Caian, Mihaela
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Bellon, G.
    Codron, F.
    Lafore, J. -P
    Poan, D. E.
    Idelkadi, A.
    Understanding the West African Monsoon from the analysis of diabatic heating distributions as simulated by climate models2017In: Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, ISSN 1942-2466, Vol. 9, no 1, 239-270 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Chadwick, R.
    et al.
    Martin, G. M.
    Copsey, D.
    Bellon, G.
    Caian, Mihaela
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Codron, F.
    Rio, C.
    Roehrig, R.
    Examining the West African Monsoon circulation response to atmospheric heating in a GCM dynamical core2017In: Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, ISSN 1942-2466, Vol. 9, no 1, 149-167 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Berdalet, Elisa
    et al.
    Kudela, Raphael
    Urban, Ed
    Enevoldsen, Henrik
    Banas, Neil S.
    Bresnan, Eileen
    Burford, Michele
    Davidson, Keith
    Gobler, Christopher J.
    Karlson, Bengt
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Lim, Po Teen
    Mackenzie, Lincoln
    Montresor, Marina
    Trainer, Vera L.
    Usup, Gires
    Yin, Kedong
    GlobalHAB A New Program to Promote International Research, Observations, and Modeling of Harmful Algal Blooms in Aquatic Systems2017In: Oceanography, ISSN 1042-8275, Vol. 30, no 1, 70-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Wesslander, Karin
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Coastal eutrophication status assessment using HEAT 1.0 (WFD methodology) versus HEAT 3.0 (MSFD methodology) and Development of an oxygen consumption indicator2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report contains two parts which are self standing reports and a contribution to the HELCOM project EUTRO-OPER. The work has been funded and commissioned by SwAM (Swedish agency for marine and water management) 2014-2015.

    • Coastal eutrophication status assessment using HEAT 1.0 (WFD methodology) versus HEAT 3.0 (MSFD methodology)

    Eutrophication status is assessed nationally in coastal waters within the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and in open sea areas within the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Both WFD and MSFD consider eutrophication but with different approaches and it is therefore a need for harmonisation in the assessment process.  The Excel based tool HEAT (HELCOM Eutrophication Assessment Tool) has been used in previous assessments in the HELCOM region. There are two versions of the tool; HEAT 1.0 and HEAT 3.0, the first is based on the WFD methodology and the second is based on the MSFD methodology. The main difference between HEAT 1.0 and HEAT 3.0 is how the indicators are grouped. Here we assess the eutrophication status in coastal waters by applying HEAT and compare the results with the national WFD assessments. The present test includes data on 33 selected coastal water bodies in five countries: Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Poland and Sweden. Data on reference condition, acceptable deviation, status and class boundaries of all indicators used in WFD for reporting ecological status (biological and physical-chemical) have been provided for each tested water body. The data has been inserted in the HEAT 1.0 and HEAT 3.0 tools and been compared with the national WFD assessments.  Both HEAT versions gave lower status in more than 50 % of the cases. For some tests the status changed to sub-GES from GES when HEAT is applied. The good/moderate boundary is the same in both HEAT and the WFD while the lower class boundaries in general are stricter in HEAT, which explains the lower status. In national WFD assessments expert judgment is used when there is little, no or very uncertain in situ data. The status in HEAT is given by the one-out-all-out principle but it is still possible to include expert judgment through the weighting factors.

    • Development of an oxygen consumption indicator

    t was investigated if the oxygen consumption can be used as an oxygen indicator for the Baltic Sea. The method is based on the idea of calculating the oxygen consumption in a stabile layer below the productive zone during summer and relating this to nutrient concentrations. With more nutrients available there is an increased biological production. By estimating how much oxygen is needed to mineralise the biological material it may be possible to link the oxygen consumption to eutrophication. The oxygen consumption was calculated for the BY15-Gotland Deep in the Eastern Gotland Basin. We identified a stabile layer between 30 and 50 m and a large change in both oxygen and nutrients from June to August. However, the oxygen consumption had a very high inter-annual variation and there were no significant correlation with the winter mean of nutrient concentrations. It was not possible to calculate the diffusion between the layers because of too sparse measurements at the stratification which limits the method. The calculation of the diffusion is however possible to improve with a model. Further on, the depth of the stabile layer is varying between areas and also between years.  We realised that the method has too many restrictions to be a functional indicator. A functional indicator shall not be dependent on heavy modelling or demand too much on expert judgement. 

    We also investigated if a possible candidate to use as a more simple oxygen consumption indicator could be the use of oxygen saturation at a specific depth. If we assume that the temperature has not changed much since the establishment of stratification we may expect that changes in oxygen saturation observed in August at this depth would be caused by the biological oxygen consumption occurring during late spring and summer. The correlation with winter mean nutrients slightly improved in this case.

  • Alfieri, Lorenzo
    et al.
    Bisselink, Berny
    Dottori, Francesco
    Naumann, Gustavo
    de Roo, Ad
    Salamon, Peter
    Wyser, Klaus
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Feyen, Luc
    Global projections of river flood risk in a warmer world2017In: Earth's Future, ISSN 1384-5160, E-ISSN 2328-4277, Vol. 5, no 2, 171-182 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • von Schuckmann, Karina
    et al.
    Le Traon, Pierre-Yves
    Alvarez-Fanjul, Enrique
    Axell, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Balmaseda, Magdalena
    Breivik, Lars-Anders
    Brewin, Robert J. W.
    Bricaud, Clement
    Drevillon, Marie
    Drillet, Yann
    Dubois, Clotilde
    Embury, Owen
    Etienne, Hélène
    Sotillo, Marcos García
    Garric, Gilles
    Gasparin, Florent
    Gutknecht, Elodie
    Guinehut, Stéphanie
    Hernandez, Fabrice
    Juza,, Melanie
    Karlson, Bengt
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Korres, Gerasimos
    Legeais, Jean-François
    Levier, Bruno
    Lien, Vidar S.
    Morrow, Rosemary
    Notarstefano, Giulio
    Parent, Laurent
    Pascual, Álvaro
    PérezGómez, Begoña
    Perruche, Coralie
    Pinardi, Nadia
    Pisano, Andrea
    Poulain, Pierre-Marie
    Pujol, Isabelle M.
    Raj, Roshin P.
    Raudsepp, Urmas
    Roquet, Hervé
    Samuelsen, Annette
    Sathyendranath, Shubha
    She, Jun
    Simoncelli, Simona
    Cosimo, Solidoro
    Tinker, Jonathan
    Tintoré, Joaquín
    Viktorsson, Lena
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Ablain, Michael
    Almroth-Rosell, Elin
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Bonaduce, Antonio
    Clementi, Emanuela
    Cossarini, Gianpiero
    Dagneaux, Quentin
    Desportes, Charles
    Dye, Stephen
    Fratianni, Claudia
    Good, Simon
    Greiner, Eric
    Gourrion, Jerome
    Hamon, Mathieu
    Holt, Jason
    Hyder, Pat
    Kennedy, John
    ManzanoMuñoz, Fernando
    Melet, Angélique
    Meyssignac, Benoit
    Mulet, Sandrine
    Buongiorno Nardelli, Bruno
    O´Dea, Enda
    Olason, Einar
    Paulmier, Aurélien
    Pérez-González, Irene
    Reid, Rebecca
    Racault, Marie-Fanny
    Raitsos, Dionysios E.
    Ramos,, Antonio
    Sykes, Peter
    Szekely, Tanguy
    Verbrugge, Nathalie
    The Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service Ocean State Report2017In: Journal of operational oceanography. Publisher: The Institute of Marine Engineering, Science & Technology, ISSN 1755-876X, E-ISSN 1755-8778, Vol. 9, no Sup.2, 235-320 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Arheimer, Berit
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Pers, Charlotta
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Lessons learned? Effects of nutrient reductions from constructing wetlands in 1996–2006 across Sweden2016In: Ecological Engineering: The Journal of Ecotechnology, ISSN 0925-8574, E-ISSN 1872-6992, 1-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
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