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  • Arheimer, Berit
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Donnelly, Chantal
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Lindström, Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Regulation of snow-fed rivers affects flow regimes more than climate change2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, 62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Mair, Louise
    et al.
    Harrison, Philip J.
    Raty, Minna
    Bärring, Lars
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Strandberg, Gustav
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Snäll, Tord
    Forest management could counteract distribution retractions forced by climate change2017In: Ecological Applications, ISSN 1051-0761, E-ISSN 1939-5582, Vol. 27, no 5, 1485-1497 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Loewe, Katharina
    et al.
    Ekman, Annica M. L.
    Paukert, Marco
    Sedlar, Joseph
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Tjernstrom, Michael
    Hoose, Corinna
    Modelling micro- and macrophysical contributors to the dissipation of an Arctic mixed-phase cloud during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS)2017In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 17, no 11, 6693-6704 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Kuentz, Anna
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Arheimer, Berit
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Wagener, Thorsten
    Understanding hydrologic variability across Europe through catchment classification2017In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 21, no 6, 2863-2879 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Haapanala, Paivi
    et al.
    Raisanen, Petri
    McFarquhar, Greg M.
    Tiira, Jussi
    Macke, Andreas
    Kahnert, Michael
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    DeVore, John
    Nousiainen, Timo
    Disk and circumsolar radiances in the presence of ice clouds2017In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 17, no 11, 6865-6882 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Karlsson, Karl-Göran
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Håkansson, Nina
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Mittaz, Jonathan P. D.
    Hanschmann, Timo
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Impact of AVHRR Channel 3b Noise on Climate Data Records: Filtering Method Applied to the CM SAF CLARA-A2 Data Record2017In: Remote Sensing, ISSN 2072-4292, E-ISSN 2072-4292, Vol. 9, no 6, 568Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Eklund, Anna
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Tofeldt, Linda
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Tengdelius Brunell, Johanna
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Johnell, Anna
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    German, Jonas
    SMHI.
    Sjökvist, Elin
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Rasmusson, Maria
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Andersson, Elinor
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Vattennivåer, tappningar, vattentemperaturer och is i Vättern Beräkningar för dagens och framtidens klimatförhållanden2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Calculations have been made for how the water level, water release, water temperature and ice extent are expected to change in Lake Vättern up to the year 2100 due to global warming.The most noticeable effects of the future climate on Lake Vättern are expected to be:

    • More frequent low water levels
    • Less frequent high water levels
    • No change in the highest water levels (the calculated maximum water level)
    • An increase in water temperature
    • A shorter ice cover period.

    With a warmer climate the evaporation is expected to increase, both from vegetation in the lake’s catchment area as well as directly from the surface of the lake. This means that the water level in Lake Vättern is expected to be lower in the future. Calculations show that the average water level in Lake Vättern is expected to drop by one to two decimetres by the end of the century, with about the same reduction for all seasons.The number of days per year where the water level is below 88.3 m is expected to increase from the present value of around 1.5 months to about 3 months by the middle of the century and 4-6 months by the end of the century. The highest levels, the calculated maximum water level, are expected to remain unchanged in the future.

  • Eklund, Anna
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Johnell, Anna
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Tofeldt, Linda
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Tengdelius Brunell, Johanna
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Andersson, Maria
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Ivarsson, Cajsa-Lisa
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    German, Jonas
    SMHI.
    Sjökvist, Elin
    SMHI, Professional Services.
    Andersson, Elinor
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Vattennivåer, tappningar, vattentemperaturer och is i Hjälmaren Beräkningar för dagens och framtidens klimatförhållanden2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Calculations have been made for how the water release, water abstraction, water temperature and ice extent are expected to change in Lake Hjälmaren up to the year 2100 due to global warming.The most noticeable effects of the future climate on Lake Hjälmaren are expected to be:

    • More frequent low water levels
    • No change in the highest water levels (the calculated maximum water level)
    • An increase in water temperature
    • A shorter ice cover period.

    The water level in Lake Hjälmaren is only expected to change by a small amount in the future climate. The most obvious change is that low water levels will be more frequent, especially during the summer and autumn. This is due to an expected increase in evaporation, both from vegetation in the lake’s catchment area and from the surface of the lake. Currently the water level is lower than 21.6 m for about one month per year onaverage. In the future the water level is expected to be lower than 21.6 m for about 3.5 months.For the highest water levels (calculated maximum water level) an increase is shown for the high emission scenario (RCP8.5) while changes are expected to be small for the scenario with limited emission of greenhouse gases (RCP4.5).The water temperature in Lake Hjälmaren is expected to increase by about half a degree by the middle of the century and by 1 to 2.5 degrees by the end of the century. The number of days per year where the surface water temperature exceeds 20 degrees is expected to increase from the current value of around 7 weeks per year to about 9 weeks per year by the middle of the century and up to 12 weeks per year by the end of the century. Currently Lake Hjälmaren is covered with ice every winter. In the future climate it is expected that there will be some winters without ice coverage. 

  • Andersson, Pia
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Hansson, Martin
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Bjurström, Joel
    Simonsson, Daniel
    Naturtypsbestämning av miljöövervakningsstationer SMHI pelagial miljöövervakning2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sampling stations in the national environmental monitoring in the marine environment is not defined when it comes to habitat. This means that the environmental monitoring data collected cannot be properly used in the assessments connected to the Habitats Directive or the Marine Framework Strategy Directive. SwAM has funded and commissioned SMHI to explore the possibilities to in a simple manner classify the habitats for the SMHI monitoring stations. The project was intended to test the equipment and through drop video examine if it is possible, and if so, determine habitats for the open sea stations during the expedition in December, 2016. SMHI has designed a rig and conducted sampling at 11 of 25 monitoring stations. Lighting problems and weather conditions reduced the number of sampled stations. SMHI:s opinion is that the rig, with adjusted light source, is a good tool for visual investigation of the habitats at the monitoring stations in the open sea. However, we have proposed a number of adjustments to the rig to increase the quality of the images and videos and to increase the possibility to carry out further assessments of the material. Most of the images show very fine-grained material like silt / clay. A few species have been recorded and almost no vegetation. Most of the stations did not meet the criteria for the Habitat Directive . At two stations habitat was registered as 1160 Bays and sounds, containing1110 Sandbanks. For HUB Underwater biotopes, AB.H3O Baltic aphotic muddy sediments Characterized by infaunal echinoderms was registered at the station P2 and AB.M4U Baltic aphotic mixed substrate Characterized by no macro community was registered on stations BY5 and BY4. SMHI recommends a review of the collected material together with ArtDatabanken and / or additional expert to ensure the performed assessment, to ensure recommendations and to quality control and define the material to be reported to a data host. SMHI recommend additional visual sampling of the remaining stations, as well as additional sampling on stations where the quality of the image was inadequate, or where ArtDatabanken or a possible additional expert recommend additional sampling. Additional experts may recommend adding sediment sampling to the visual method at some stations. Performing visual sampling of all 25 stations, with one landing per station, will extend the expedition with approximately 11,5-13, hours.

  • Wesslander, Karin
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Viktorsson, Lena
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Summary of the Swedish National Marine Monitoring 2016 - Hydrography, nutrients and phytoplankton2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Results from the Swedish national marine monitoring in the pelagic during 2016 are presented. The institutes who conduct the national monitoring are SMHI (Swedish meteorological and hydrological institute), SU (Stockholm University) and UMF (Umeå marine sciences centre). The presented parameters in this report are; salinity, temperature, oxygen, dissolved inorganic phosphorous, total phosphorous, dissolved inorganic nitrogen, total nitrogen, dissolved silica, chlorophyll and phytoplankton. Secchi depth, zooplankton, humus, primary production, pH and alkalinity are also measured but not presented. Seasonal plots for surface waters are presented in Appendix I.  Time series for surface waters (0-10 m) and bottom waters are presented in Appendix II. The amount of nutrients in the sub-basins of the Baltic Sea is presented per season and year in Appendix III.Exceptional events 2016 

    • A warm September due to several high pressure systems, with temperatures more than one standard deviation above mean in almost all stations from Skagerrak, Kattegat and the Baltic Proper.
    • Low oxygen in Kattegat bottom water during autumn as can be seen in the seasonal plots for both Anholt E and Fladen.
    • Improved oxygen condition in the East Gotland Basin, due to an increased frequency of deep water inflows in comparison to the period 1983 until the large inflow in December 2014. The inflow of 30 km3 in the beginning of the year could be tracked in the deep water in the Eastern Gotland Basin in June.
    •  Elevated levels of silicate have been observed in the Baltic Sea since 2014 and the silicate levels were also elevated this year but mainly in the central and the northern parts of the Baltic Proper.
    • In July there were high cell numbers of the dinoflagellate Dinophysis acuminata, which caused high levels of toxins in blue mussels. During this period it was forbidden to harvest blue mussels along the Bohus coast.
    • Unusual long period of cyanobacteria bloom in the Baltic Sea.
  • Wesslander, Karin
    et al.
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Andersson, Lars
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Axe, Philip
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Johansson, Johannes
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Linders, Johanna
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Nexelius, Nils
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Skjevik, Ann-Turi
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Swedish National Report on Eutrophication Status in the Skagerrak, Kattegat and the Sound - OSPAR ASSESSMENT 20162017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish OSPAR waters were assessed by applying the OSPAR Common Procedure for the time period 2006 – 2014. The Swedish parts of Skagerrak, Kattegat and the Sound constitute the outer part of the transition zone between the estuarine Baltic Sea and the oceanic North Sea and were investigated for nutrients, chlorophyll-a,oxygen, macrophytes, phytoplankton and zoobenthos. The conclusion from the overall assessment of the Swedish OSPAR waters was that only Skagerrak open sea could be classified as a Non-Problem Area and all other assessment units were classified as Problem Areas.  Atmospheric input of nitrogen significantly decreased in both Skagerrak and Kattegat and the land based input of total nutrients also decreased in Skagerrak, Kattegat as well as the Sound. However, the short-term trend of nitrogen input to the Sound was positive. Skagerrak is governed by trans-boundary transports from the North Sea of mainly nitrogen but also phosphorus. Kattegat receives trans-boundary nutrients from both the Baltic Sea through the Sound and from Skagerrak and transports nutrients towards the coast and the western part of the basin.  Overall, concentrations of DIN, DIP, TN and chlorophyll-a decreased in most areas, however, no significant trends were found for DIP. Increasing concentrations were found in silicate, POC and TP. The Secchi depth increased in most areas. Oxygen deficiency was mainly a problem in the fjords and the Kattegat open sea.  In Skagerrak coastal waters winter nutrients were only elevated in the fjords. Concentrations of DIN generally decreased significantly and there were tendencies of decreasing DIP. This pattern was also supported by the total nitrogen while total phosphorus increased. Secchi depth was improving and there was a significant positive trend of increasing depths. However, zoobenthos were still in bad condition and phytoplankton indicator species were often elevated. Chlorophyll-a concentrations were generally decreasing but still elevated in the inner coastal waters. There were also problems with algal toxins such as DST (Diarrhetic Shellfish Toxin) and PST (Paralystic Shellfish Toxin) infections in the area. According to the OSPAR classification scheme, a unit with no evident increased nutrient enrichment can be classified as a Problem Area but the cause might be due to trans-boundary transport from adjacent areas. In the open area of Kattegat there were still problems with oxygen deficiency, especially in the southern parts, even though the trend was significantly positive for the assessment period 2006 – 2014. Concentrations of chlorophyll-a and DIN decreased significantly, however, DIN levels were still generally elevated, especially in the southern parts of Kattegat while DIP was closer to the assessment level. In Kattegat coastal waters winter nutrients were elevated in all assessment units, except from the inner coastal waters, even though there was a general pattern of decreasing going trends. Chlorophyll-a was mainly elevated in the Sound and the estuaries. Secchi depth is generally improving and a significant increase was seen in the Sound. Also in Kattegat, zoobenthos were in bad condition and phytoplankton indicator species were often elevated. 

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